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Speaker Slides and Video

Presentation slides will be made available after the session has concluded and the speaker has given us the files. Check back if you don't see the file you're looking for—it might be available later! (However, please note some speakers choose not to share their presentations.)

Carol Smith (Google, Inc.)
A (very) fast overview of the results of the program: lines of code, #'s of participants, and so on.
Kevin Crocker (Pivotal)
Slides:   1-PPT 
Data scientists need to have a grab bag of tools available to accomplish the task of value-driven data analytics. Many of those tools are open source. Come see how Pivotal is leveraging and contributing to open source with data science. Special focus on: R, Python, MADlib, Open Chorus, Apache Tomcat, Apache Hadoop, Redis, Rabbit MQ, Cloud Foundry and other open source toolkits.
Florian Haas (hastexo)
Slides:   external link
Still building presentations in an office suite? That's so 2013! Today, you can build awesome, engaging presentations that run in your browser or on your phone, using nothing but HTML5 and a few clever JavaScript libraries. And it's super simple! This talk shows you how.
Chris McEniry (Sony Network Entertainment)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This tutorial provides an introduction to Go with a focus on using it for everyday sysadmins tooling. A example of working from iostat is used to show a practical approach to learning the language.
Matt Stine (Pivotal)
Slides:   external link
The Go programming language has emerged as a favorite tool of DevOps and cloud practitioners alike. In many ways, Go is more famous for what it doesn't include than what it does, and co-author Rob Pike has said that Go represents a 'less is more' approach to language design. This talk will introduce Go and its distinctives to Java developers looking to add Go to their toolkits.
Nicolas Steenhout (Accessibility NZ)
Slides:   external link
Did you hear about the double arm amputee who was refused service at a bank because he could not provide a thumbprint? Or the online petition to increase services for blind folks, that they couldn’t sign because of CAPTCHA? These are examples of security practices that cause barriers to people with disabilities. Security can create barriers, but it doesn’t have to reduce accessibility!
Brian Capouch (Saint Josephs College), Nathan Samano (Saint Joseph's College (Indiana)), Alex Yong (Saint Joseph's College (Indiana)), Steven Quella (Saint Joseph's College (Indiana)), Danilo Zekovic (Saint Joseph's College (Indiana))
Slides:   external link
The prospects and promise of webRTC--direct browser-to-browser multimedia communications--have led to an explosion of tools, both proprietary and Open Source. In this session we present an overview of a variety of tools vying for attention, along with a demonstration of the sipML Javascript toolkit, using webRTC-enabled browsers and the latest version of Asterisk.
Slides:   1-PDF 
Elasticsearch is about more than just search. It’s currently being used in production for everything from traditional text search, to big data analytics, to distributed document storage. This talk will introduce you to Elasticsearch’s REST API, and discuss the basics of full text search and analytics with Elasticsearch.
Sarah Guido (Reonomy)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
Python is quickly becoming the go-to language for data analysis, but it can be difficult to figure out which tools to use. In this presentation, I’ll give a bird’s eye overview of some of the best tools for data analysis and how you can apply them to your own workflow. I’ll introduce you to how you can use Pandas, Scikit-Learn, NLTK, MRJob, and matplotlib for data analysis.
Mike Wolfson (Epocrates)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This session is an overview of the Android Developer Tools (ADT and Android Studio), including many useful techniques, tips and tricks for getting the most out of them.
Sam Helman (MongoDB, Inc)
Slides:   external link
AngularJS is relatively new, meteorically popular, and functionally powerful. However, a lot of AngularJS’s workings are very opaque and confusing. In this tutorial, my goal is to walk you through building a basic app, and introduce you to concepts, patterns, and ways of thinking that will allow you to comfortably dive further into using AngularJS for future projects.
Simon Wardley (Leading Edge Forum (CSC))
In this keynote, Simon will present the general principles of industry change and describe what can and cannot be predicted. He will then examine how companies can better understand the environment around them and by anticipating the nature of change then manipulate the market in their favor through open techniques.
Joe Bowser (Adobe Systems)
Slides:   external link
A review of the past six years of Apache Cordova development, starting from its origins as PhoneGap, to its donation to the Apache Software Foundation, told from the point of view of its longest running contributor. This will include a simple introduction to cross-platform hybrid applications on iOS and Android, and their evolution.
William A Rowe Jr (Pivotal)
Slides:   1-ODP 
This presentation covers all aspects of configuring Apache HTTP Server for https/TLS, including ECC, RSA and DH keys and key strength, cipher suites, SSL session caches vs. session tickets, OCSP stapling and TLS virtual hostnames. These elements are integrated to provide perfect forward secrecy and meet modern best practices for both client and proxied connections.
Manish Pandit (Netflix)
Slides:   1-ZIP    external link
At Netflix Engineering's Partner Product Innovation group, we underwent a revamp of the tech stack to make it API-driven. This was to not only help with the expanding list of API consumers, but also to address the evolving streaming business. With Scala, Scalatra, and Swagger, we achieved one of the best architecture for the scale, agility and robustness needed.
Tina Coleman (Next Century Corporation)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Furby's are back and more annoying than ever. Forget about a traffic light flashing or an email. When that Furby starts jabbering, you'll do ANYTHING to fix that build quickly. This talk will connect an Arduino board with Jenkins continuous integration framework and out to the Furby to let it annoy your development team, rather than you!
Michael Shiloh (Arduino)
Slides:   1-ODP    external link
The new Arduino Yun contains both an Arduino Leonardo and a full Linux system on a chip with built-in Ethernet and Wifi. This intermediate level hands-on tutorial will teach you how to use the Yun to communicate between Yun and Yun, Yun and laptop, and Yun and internet services, such Gmail, Twitter, and other services with APIs
Chad Naber (Intel), David Elfi (Intel Corporation)
Slides:   external link
Do you know how long could it take to your team start producing value in the Big Data and Machine Learning area? This talk shows a real team experience starting from scratch to a functional Big Data and Machine Learning platform using several open source tools such as Apache Hadoop, Apache Hive and Python frameworks SciPy/Numpy/scikit-learn
Sudhir Tonse (Netflix), Danny Yuan (Netflix Inc)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This session presents the data platform used at Netflix for event collection, aggregation, and analysis. The platform helps Netflix process and analyze billions of events every day. Attendees will learn how to assemble their own large-scale data pipeline/analytics platform using open source software from NetflixOSS and others, such as Kafka, ElasticSearch, Druid from Metamarkets, and Hive.
Vishwas Babu (Conflux Technologies)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
AngularJS is one of the most widely adopted open source Javascript frameworks in recent times. We use it for a not-so-typical use case: web apps to deliver financial services to the poor. In this case-study session, we analyze the pros/cons of AngularJS, establish why it was right for us, and go over our experiences using this powerful lightweight framework which adds value to our community daily.
Omri Gazitt (Hewlett Packard)
More and more Enterprises are evaluating and adopting OpenStack as an option for deployments in the cloud. HP Helion OpenStack is the latest addition to the OpenStack distribution, find out how your Enterprise can leverage it to deliver a scalable, secure and stable cloud environment for complex workloads.
Wynn Netherland (GitHub)
Slides:   external link
How do you build and maintain a stable API while rapidly iterating and innovating in your business? Change can never be eliminated, but its impact can be minimized. GitHub takes a pragmatic approach to Hypermedia that emphasizes workflows over data retrieval and employs open source to ensure a consistent experience for API consumers.
Will Marshall (Planet Labs)
Keynote by Will Marshall, CEO of Planet Labs.
Mike Amundsen (API Academy, CA Technologies)
Slides:   1-PDF 
With the rise of cloud-based services and Web APIs, it may be time to re-visit Raymond's 19 'lessons' from his book 'The Cathedral and the Bazaar' to see how they can be applied (and/or modified) to fit a world where much of the software we use is no longer installed locally and is often kept out of reach from most developers and users.
Tim Bell (CERN)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
As part of a large-scale adoption of cloud computing to support the increasing computing needs of the Large Hadron Collider processing over 35 PB/year, the infrastructure of CERN IT is undergoing major changes in both technology and culture. This session will describe the steps taken, the challenges encountered and our outlook for the future.
Leslie Hawthorn (Elasticsearch)
The purpose of this talk is to reexamine the topic through the lens of concrete things individuals can do to check their privilege – and to put it to work serving themselves and others.
Matt Ray (Chef Software, Inc.)
Slides:   1-PDF 
The open source configuration management and automation framework Chef is used to configure, deploy and manage many large public and private installations of OpenStack and supports a wide variety of integration opportunities. OpenStack is a large and complex ecosystem, this session will highlight the Chef resources available for developers and operators.
Bryan Call (Yahoo!)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
With Web performance and scalability becoming more and more important, choosing advanced HTTP intermediaries is a vital skill. This presentation will give the audience a thorough walkthrough of the most popular and advanced solutions available today. The audience will gain a solid background to be able to make the right choices when it comes to HTTP intermediaries and proxy caches.
Katie Miller (Red Hat)
Slides:   external link
For the uninitiated, a conversation with functional programmers can feel like ground zero of a jargon explosion. In this talk Lambda Ladies Co-Founder Katie Miller will help you to defend against the blah-blah blast by demystifying several terms commonly used by FP fans with bite-sized Haskell examples and friendly pictures. Expect appearances by Curry, Lens, and the infamous M-word, among others.
Lars Kurth (Citrix Systems Ltd)
Slides:   1-PDF 
In this talk we will look at some of the basic dynamics playing out in open source communities and introduce some mental models explaining them. We will look at the Open Source Flywheel (inspired by Walton's Productivity Loop and the Bezos Flywheel) and the Open Source Community Funnel (inspired by Sales Funnels) to explain them.
Mark Hinkle (Citrix)
Slides:   external link
The open source mantra is to release early and release often. That means software velocity can be difficult to keep up with. This discussion will expand on the latest open source software used to deliver and manage cloud computing infrastructure. Topics covered include virtualization (KVM, Xen Project, LXC), orchestration (OpenStack, CloudStack, Eucalyptus), and other complimentary technology.
Markus Lanthaler (Freelancer)
Web APIs are increasingly important but their creation is still more an art than a science. This talk will demonstrate how Web APIs consumable by generic clients can be implemented in considerably less time. It will also give a brief introduction to JSON-LD and Hydra.
Rob Allen (Nineteen Feet Limited)
Slides:   external link
How should you organise your models in a PHP MVC application? What is a service class, a mapper or an entity? This talk will look at the components of the model layer and the options you have when creating your models. We’ll look at the different schools of thought in this area and compare and contrast their strengths and weaknesses with an eye to flexibility and testability.
Darryn Campbell (Motorola Solutions, Inc.)
Slides:   1-PDF 
With current best practices for mobile development, you can create great enterprise applications faster, iterate more often, and future-proof against a fast-changing mobile OS and hardware landscape. This session will look at key considerations for developers building enterprise apps for any device and OS.
Paco Nathan (Databricks)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Several frameworks have emerged for handling data workflows. Meanwhile, business use of Machine Learning is less about algorithms and more about leveraging workflows. This talk compares/contrasts different workflow approaches with focus on use cases, plus how some leverage the PMML open standard. Summary points build a scorecard for evaluating frameworks based on your use case needs.
Dave Quigley (KEYW Corporation)
Slides:   1-ODP    external link
Building on last year’s critically acclaimed ‘Demystifying SELinux: WTF is it saying?’ talk Demystifying ‘SELinux Part II: Who’s policy is it anyway?’ is an extended tutorial which has attendees work through real life examples of SELinux configuration and policy construction.
Mike Amundsen (API Academy, CA Technologies)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Sometimes your API is meant for a small group and will live for only a short time. Other times, your aim is to create an interface that will have wide appeal and should last years into the future. This talk shows you how to create and maintain an API that it can be both stable and vital well into the future.
Doris Chen (Microsoft)
Slides:   external link
Creating high performance sites and apps is crucial for every developer. In this session, we will explore the best practices and performance tricks, to make your apps running faster and fluid. Come learn the tips, tricks, and tools for maximizing the performance of your sites and apps with JavaScript and HTML5.
Arun Gupta (Red Hat)
Slides:   external link
Devoxx4Kids is a worldwide initiative that introduces programming, robotics, and engineering to kids by organizing events and workshops. This session will share how Devoxx4Kids is giving Scratch, Greenfoot, Minecraft, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, NAO, Tynker workshops. The session will show a path that can be followed by parents to keep their kids engaged and build, instead of just play games.
Allison Mankin (Verisign, Inc.), Willem Toorop (NLNet Labs), Neel Goyal (Verisign, Inc.), Glen Wiley (Verisign, Inc.)
Slides:   1-PDF 
The need for secure DNS is more pressing than ever but the current standard API for using the DNS can't take advantage of modern DNS features. We will give an application developers view of DNSSEC and describe the independently written getDNS API specification. We will showcase the open source implementation of the specification built by our team of developers from NLNet Labs and Verisign.
Eric Tschetter (Tidepool.org)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This talk will focus on the motivation, design, and architecture of Druid (druid.io), an open-source, real-time analytical data store. Druid is used in production at several organizations to facilitate rapid exploration of high dimensional spaces. Druid can maintain a 95% query latency under 1 second on data sets with >50 billion rows and 2 trillion impressions in tables with 30+ dimensions.
Erik Rose (Mozilla), Laura Thomson (Mozilla Corporation)
Slides:   external link
Elasticsearch provides a powerful combination of clustered full-text search, synonyms, faceting, and geographic math, but there's a big gap between its documentation and real life. We'll tell hard-won war stories, work through hands-on examples, and show what happens behind the scenes, leaving you equipped to get the best use out of Elasticseach in your projects.
Brian Troutwine (AdRoll)
Slides:   external link
Erlang is a concurrent programming language with a small, active community and many high-uptime, critical deployments. It's syntax is a bit odd, being inspired by Prolog. Other languages--Elixir, notably--have begun to reap the benefits of Erlang's VM, BEAM, modifying syntax and semantics. This talk will provide a view of the BEAM languages, their history, motivations and benefits.
Byron Ruth (The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia)
Slides:   1-PDF 
There is an adage that given enough data, a data scientist can answer the world's questions. The untold truth is that the majority of work happens during the ETL and data preprocessing phase. In this talk I discuss Origins, an open source Python library for extracting and mapping structural metadata across heterogenous data stores.
Arun Gupta (Red Hat)
Slides:   1-PDF 
The Java EE 7 platform has 4 new components (WebSocket, JSON-P, batch, and concurrency), 3 that are significantly updated (JAX-RS, JMS, and EL), and several others that bring significant changes to the platform. This session explains each feature with a code snippet and provides details on where and how you can use it in your applications.
Luciano Ramalho (Python.pro.br)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Metaprograming in Python is fun and profitable thanks to its rich Data Model – APIs that let you handle functions, modules and even classes as objects that you can create, inspect and modify at runtime. The Data Model also enables your own objects to support infix operators, become iterable and emulate collections. This workshop shows how, through a diverse selection of examples and exercises.
Henri Muurimaa (Vaadin Ltd)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Exploring how the functional language features of Java 8 and Scala combine with Vaadin to allow you to write clearer UI code.
Sebastian Tiedtke (Sauce Labs Inc)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Mobile's here to stay! This talk will showcase how Open Source tools can power your test automation for mobile apps. It entirely relies on Open Source components such as Appium, Cordova/PhoneGap an Topcoat.
Jason Swartz (Netflix, Inc), Kelsey Gilmore-Innis (Reverb)
Slides:   external link
Scala powers some of the biggest companies in the world, including Twitter, Intel, and LinkedIn. Come learn what led them to choose this powerful JVM language and try it out yourself. You’ll get a hands-on intro to Scala and functional programming concepts by building your own performant REST API. No FP experience needed--if you can build apps in Java, Python or Ruby you’ll do great in this class.
Benjamin Kerensa (Mozilla), Alex Lakatos (Mozilla)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Firefox OS is a new mobile operating system, developed by Mozilla, which lets users install and run open web applications created using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. The session will introduce people to Firefox OS, the overview, branding and distribution and will explain the governance behind it.
Steve Francia (MongoDB)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This tutorial will give developers an introduction and practical experience in building applications with the go language. Go expert Steve Francia will lead the class to build a working go web and cli application together teaching fundamentals, key features and best practices along the way.
Brent Beer (GitHub)
Slides:   external link
Learn everything you need to know from Git and GitHub to be the most effective member of your team, save yourself from any jam, and work with the rest of your team flawlessly.
Emma Jane Westby (Freelance)
Slides:   external link
You are a clever and talented person. You have architected a system that even my cat could use; your spreadsheet-fu is legendary. Your peers adore you. Your clients love you. But, until now, you haven’t *&^#^! been able to make Git work. It makes you angry inside that you have to ask for help, again, to figure out that *&^#^! command to upload your work. It's not you. It's Git. Promise.
Emma Jane Westby (Freelance)
Slides:   external link
You've dabbled a little in version control using Git. You can follow along with the various tutorials you've found online. But now you've been asked to implement a work flow strategy and you're not really sure how (or where) to start. You have a lot of choices, we'll help you pick the right one for your project.
Alvaro Videla (RabbitMQ), Michael Laing (New York Times)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
Learn about the 'nyt⨍aбrik' platform which sits behind The New York Times website. Learn how it scales across many continents and AWS availability zones using RabbitMQ as the backbone of communication for exchanging messages in near real-time. nyt⨍aбrik is built on open-source and most of it will be open sourced.
Steve Francia (MongoDB)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Object Oriented programming has dominated software engineering for the last two decades. Although Go is not OO in the strict sense, we can continue to leverage the skills we've honed as OO engineers. This talk will cover how to use our OO programming fundamentals in go, common mistakes made by those coming to go from other OO languages (Ruby, Python, JS, etc.), and principles of good design in go.
Slides:   external link
Go is an open source language first released in 2009. Go is popular because it makes coding super-fun again. Josh will illustrate the deep role tools like gofmt, godoc, 'go vet', 'go test' and others play in the Go experience, show you how to roll your own, and talk about some unexplored possibilities.
Rob Reilly (Rob Reilly Consulting)
Slides:   1-ODP 
It's a great time to be a hardware hacker. What started with the Arduino has now evolved to the Raspberry Pi, the BeagleBone Black, the Spark Core, the new Arduino Yun, and a host of other boards. How do you know which one is right for your project? This talk will compare the mainstream boards, how they are applied and help you decide which one best fits your needs.
David Uhlman (clearhealth inc.)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Hacking Healthcare author David Uhlman will show you how to 3D print your body parts, order your own lab work, build a DNA analyzer, tour an array of personal monitoring devices for fitness, health and open biology projects, stop eating altogether by switching to soylent. Also tips on what insurance to get, navigating hospitals and finding the right doctor.
Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Jonathon Manning (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.)
Slides:   external link
Understanding games means understanding user engagement and interaction. In this session, you'll learn a fresh perspective on user experience design by understanding how users engage with the fastest-growing form of entertainment in the world.
Jason Hibbets (Red Hat), Gail Roper (City of Raleigh)
Slides:   external link
Open source, open data, and open access, that's what the City of Raleigh is all about. But how did Raleigh go from open government resolution to an open data portal and a preference for open source software for IT procurement? Come to this session to learn how city government and citizens are working together to create an open source city.
Jamie Allen (Typesafe)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
An introduction to building Reactive Applications and what tools you can use to do so.
Steven Pousty (Red Hat)
Slides:   external link
Whether you have one or a million visitors accessing your web app, they are all going to demand a great user experience regardless of what it takes for you to deliver it. This invariably means quick page loads and fast response times every single time.I am about different ways to start scaling your application with the new 'Cloud' technology.
Mihail Irintchev (SiteGround)
Slides:   external link
Sane and safe continuous deployment (and testing) can be achieved without much effort using a set of freely-available open-source tools, such as a good source control system, Phing, PHPUnit, some security tools, phpDocumentor and others.
Curtis Poe (All Around The World)
Slides:   1-PPTX    2-ZIP 
Many expert programmers who write complex SQL without a second thought still struggle with database design. Unfortunately, many introductory topics cause eyes to glaze over when we read 'transitive dependencies' and 'Boyce-Codd normal form'. When you're done with this talk, you'll understand the basics of creating a database that won't make a DBA yell at you. We won't even use (many) big words.
Carl Quinn (Riot Games)
Slides:   1-ZIP 
The Netflix OSS Cloud stack is clearly a great set of components for building a cloud infrastructure and platform—if you are Netflix. But how does that architecture work for other businesses? Learn how at Riot we leveraged Netflix OSS cloud tools and platform components to create an infrastructure for our global game platform—maybe it can work for you too.
Andy Gup (Esri)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
Learn about going beyond simple cookies and busting the 5MB limit imposed by Web Storage. We'll dive into the IndexedDB API and open your world to reading and writing not just strings from within browser storage, but also blobs, Arrays and Objects too.
José Valim (Plataforma Tec)
Slides:   1-BIN 
This talk will introduce developers to the Elixir programming language and the Erlang VM and show how they introduce a completely new vocabulary which shapes how developers design and build distributed, fault-tolerant applications. This talk also discusses Elixir goals and what it brings to the Erlang VM.
Wade Minter (TeamSnap), Andrew Berkowitz (TeamSnap), Bill Cernansky (ComedySportz)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Getting everyone in your company or development team on the same page can be a challenge. This on-your-feet workshop will teach fast, fun improv techniques for helping your group to bond, generate quality ideas and make quick decisions. Learn the secrets of applied improv from two professionals who have decades of experience working in open source, Internet startups and corporate training.
Yazz Atlas (Hewlett-Packard)
Slides:   1-PDF 
OpenStack is an open source implementation of cloud computing, potentially at very large scale. However, it has many moving parts and is complex to operate. SaltStack appears to provide scalable and secure orchestration for OpenStack.
Andy Piper (Twitter)
Slides:   1-PDF 
As the internet grows, there are more and more interesting devices to connect to it - some of which are mobile, sensor platforms, or healthcare devices. This is all part of the 'Internet of Things' that has been an emerging area of excitement for the last few years. MQTT is a lightweight, messaging system for connected devices, the Industrial Internet, mobile, and the IoT.
James Pannacciulli (Media Temple)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Broad introduction to Bash features for users who want to go beyond simple command execution. Covered topics include builtins, keywords, functions, parameters (arguments, variables, arrays, special parameters), parameter expansion and manipulation, compound commands (loops, groups, conditionals), and brace expansion.
James Turnbull (Docker)
Slides:   1-PDF 
You've heard the hype about Docker and container virtualization now see it in action. This tutorial will introduce you to Docker and take you through installing it, running it and integrating it into your development and operational workflow.
Josh Patterson (Patterson Consulting), Adam Gibson (Skymind.io)
Slides:   1-PPTX    2-PDF 
In this session, we will take a look at how we parallelize Deep Belief Networks in Deep Learning on the next​-generation YARN framework Iterative Reduce and the parallel machine learning library Metronome. We’ll also take a look at some real world applications of Deep Learning on Hadoop such as image classification and NLP.
Wendy Chisholm (Microsoft)
Keynote by Wendy Chisholm, Senior Accessibility Strategist and Universal Design Evangelist, Microsoft.
Jerome Petazzoni (Docker Inc.)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Linux Containers (or LXC) is now a popular choice for development and testing environments. As more and more people use them in production deployments, they face a common question: are Linux Containers secure enough? It is often claimed that containers have weaker isolation than virtual machines. We will explore whether this is true, if it matters, and what can be done about it.
Paco Nathan (Databricks)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Advanced math for business people: “just enough math” to take advantage of new classes of open source frameworks. Many take college math up to calculus, but never learn how to approach sparse matrices, complex graphs, or supply chain optimizations. This tutorial ties these pieces together into a conceptual whole, with use cases and simple Python code, as a new approach to computational thinking.
Simon St. Laurent (O'Reilly Media, Inc.), James Grierson (Bluehost.com), Raymond Henderson (Grassroots.org)
Non-profit entities help impact the lives for millions of people, and make the world a better place. Bluehost is working with Grassroots.org to help make it simpler for non-profits to get online and share their messages with the world. Join us and learn how you can help make a difference.
Shashank Khandelwal (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau)
Slides:   external link
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (http://cfpb.gov) has developed an open source web-based tool to make regulations easy to read, access and understand. We talk about the unique parsing and other challenges we encountered working with these legal documents, and how we used Python, pyParsing, Django and other open source tools to solve them.
Justin Miller (Mapbox)
Slides:   external link
Mapbox is leading the way in open mapping. Large companies are switching to OpenStreetMap and open source software for mapping. Learn how Mapbox is running a business like you would run an open source project and how it is succeeding in a field dominated by large, well-funded players by being open.
Deirdré Straughan (Ericsson)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Today's tech job descriptions want 'superstars', but most companies – and employees! – still treat employee talent as a replaceable commodity. How can you market yourself and your talents, to benefit your own career as well as the company or project you work for? This talk will provide practical ideas and real-life case studies, based on years of experience helping geeks communicate what they do.
Connor Doyle (Mesosphere, Inc.), Niklas Nielsen (Mesosphere, Inc.), Adam Bordelon (Mesosphere, Inc.)
Slides:   external link,   external link
The shift to the cloud is old news. Unfortunately, the pain of developing distributed architectures is not. Apache Mesos handles the hard parts of building distributed systems and lets developers focus on what makes their application special. In this workshop, we will illustrate how to write applications on Mesos by walking through the implementation of an example framework.
Boyd Stephens (Netelysis)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Money Machines are small scale highly technical or craft based entrepreneurial excursions. The purpose of the Money Machine is to empower individuals with tools which will allow her/him/them to follow their geeky and nerdy passion of passions while enabling them to address the various financial necessities of life. Money Machines allow people to work in the manner of their choosing.
Patricia Gorla (The Last Pickle)
Slides:   1-PDF    external link
Computing is spreading outwards: clusters of 1000s of nodes serve a single database, and hundreds of machines analyze the same KPIs. How do we monitor a cluster with many nodes? This talk presents how to effectively monitor a multi-node Cassandra cluster using Riemann and other graphing solutions.
Kevin Kluge (Elasticsearch), Steve Mayzak (Elasticsearch)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Elasticsearch is an open-source document store known for enabling search and real-time analytics on large data sets. In this presentation we will walk through the development of an application that monitors the Parrot AR.Drone. This application will collect metrics from the drone and then transform them to JSON for storage and real-time analysis in Elasticsearch.
Heather VanCura (Java Community Process JCP), Patrick Curran (Java Community Process)
Slides:   external link
This session will explore how Java development has been brought into the open over the past several years. Several Java developer community efforts have brought open source development processes and new levels of transparency and participation into their communities.
Alex Brandt (Rackspace Hosting)
Slides:   1-PDF 
There has been an explosion in datastore technologies. There are five main types of datastores: Relational, Column Family, Graph, Key-Value and Document. Polyglot Persistence, or the ability to have many different types of datastores interacting with one application, is becoming more prominent and beginning to take center stage.
Tim Nugent (Freelance)
Slides:   external link
These days, moving away doesn’t put too much of a dampener on staying in touch with your friends. Unfortunately, it has had a severe effect on my regular board games day. So, I thought, why not solve this problem with telepresence board gaming? Can’t be too hard! This session will cover what's been done, and what problems are still out there I have no idea about how to solve?
Mark Powell (Jet Propulsion Laboratory/NASA)
Slides:   external link
The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been busy lately open sourcing its software, such as mobile apps for viewing the latest Mars images, communicating between robots, and sharing scientific analysis software in using app containers and cloud computing. Come and listen to stories and anecdotes about working on NASA projects and our journey into open source.
Daniel Jacobson (Netflix)
Slides:   external link
Operating a massive-scale system, such as the Netflix API, is no trivial task. It supports over 44M members in 40+ countries and sees billions of requests a day. Along the way, there have been many mistakes, yet it is still at the center of the Netflix streaming ecosystem. In this session, I will go into detail on the top ten lessons learned in operating this complex and critical system.
Austin Putman (Omada Health)
Slides:   external link
Learn how someone writes code by writing code with them. Using katas and pair programming on actual code allows you to get an honest look at the candidate's thought process and capabilities, while exposing them to your team's culture and key players. Help your evaluators be focused on what kind of people you actually want on your project by creating key prompts for them to check.
C. Aaron Cois (Carnegie Mellon University, Software Engineering Institute)
Slides:   external link
In this session, I’ll presenting high-quality Node.js design patterns. I’ll bring to the table design patterns I’ve stumbled across in my own Node projects, as well as patterns observed from experts in the Node.js community. Topics include: Mastering Modules, Object Inheritance in Node.js, Patterns to avoid callback hell, Batch and Queuing patterns for massively concurrent asynchronous I/O
The 10th Annual O’Reilly Open Source Award winners will be announced.
Brent Shaffer (Adobe Systems Inc)
Slides:   1-PDF 
If your application doesn't have APIs, it's probably written in Cold Fusion. Every application has APIs, and APIs need authentication. See how OAuth2 is robust enough to satisfy the demands of the enterprise, while still serving the smallest of side projects.
Ken Walker (IBM Canada)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Working in open source is living the dream, right? What happens when that dream clashes with the real world deliveries associated with those paying you to work in the open. Speaking from 3 years of experience working on a new tools project and through interviews with others in the industry, this talk should help show you through the ups and downs.
Alan Sill (Texas Tech University)
Slides:   external link,   2-PDF 
In the range of API and protocol development from free-form to totally static, there is room in open clouds for patterns that allow both for dynamic discovery and predictable reuse. This talk highlights open cloud standards-based methods that have stood up to testing in the National Science Foundation's Cloud and Autonomic Computing Center Standards Testing Lab under real-world conditions.
Ryan Vinyard (Highway1)
Open source design has been a recent trend in hardware, but it tends to be limited to open libraries of 3D-printable parts. These are geared at makers, artists, hobbyists, and whoever else really wants to print their own figurines, not necessarily the engineering community.
Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
Keynote by Paul Fenwick, managing director of Perl Training Australia.
Scott Murray (University of San Francisco)
Slides:   external link
Design is a process, not a product. What processes do successful data designers follow, and how can we all benefit by open-sourcing our processes (to make better products)?
Edward Finkler (FictiveKin)
Slides:   1-PDF 
I was diagnosed with depression and anxiety when I was thirteen, and I've been struggling with it my whole life. In this talk, I'll discuss how it has impacted my work as a developer, husband, and father. By speaking openly about my experiences, I hope those struggling with mental illness will know the are not alone, and others can better understand how to be helpful and supportive.
Christian Ternus (Akamai)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Denial of Service (DoS) attacks have been making the news lately -- can your site hold up? In this talk, we'll look at a number of open-source tools for testing your site and walk through ways to guard yourself against web attackers.
Steve Francia (MongoDB)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Find out why some people claim Go and MongoDB are a 'pair made in heaven' and 'the best database driver they've ever used' in this talk by Gustavo Niemeyer, the author of the mgo driver, and Steve Francia, the drivers team lead at MongoDB Inc.
Marc Sugiyama (Erlang Solutions, Inc)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This tutorial is a quick introduction to the Elixir programming language. We’ll explore the basics of the language, meta programming, and explore why you want to use Elixir to write concurrent, scalable, and robust programs.
Simon Wardley (Leading Edge Forum (CSC))
Most organisations have strategy documents full of implementation, purchasing, tactical and operational choices. Remove this and you're often left with a vague 'why' which normally boils down to copying everyone else. In this tutorial I'll demonstrate how a large number of companies are playing a game of chess in which they can't see the board and how you can exploit this.
Jim Tommaney (InfiniDB)
Slides:   1-PDF 
The Global Database of Events, Language, and Tone (GDELT) is an initiative to construct a catalog of human societal-scale behavior and beliefs across all countries of the world. Analysis of this data set requires addressing typical data quality and data skew issues. Use a combined Hadoop + SQL on Hadoop stack to cleanse the data and deliver insights into the state of the world.
Spencer Krum (HP), William Van Hevelingen (Portland State University)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Learn to use Puppet like a Pro! We will take you through several examples of how to bring your Puppet deployment to the next level. We will cover Hiera, deploying puppet code, code architecture best practices, and integrating external tools.
Vidhya Gholkar (Freelance)
Slides:   external link
A large part of the internet of things will be made up of small constrained devices. The IETF is standardising protocols which are memory, energy and network efficient. Come and get an overview of these and of some Open Source implementations. See devices including Arduinos and Raspberry Pis with several sensors talking with one another and be inspired to build/connect your own devices.
Moderated by:
Sarah Novotny (NGINX)
Panelists:
Edwin Aoki (PayPal), Danese Cooper (PayPal), Josh Bleecher Snyder (PayPal)
In February of this year, PayPal announced it had hired Danese Cooper as their first Head of Open Source. PayPal? And Open Source? In fact, Open Source is playing a key role in reinventing PayPal engineering as a place where innovation at scale is easy and fun - especially if you like to work in Open Source.
Jeff Wolski (Uber)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Uber is one of the fastest growing companies in the world and the real-time engineering team are responsible for their mission critical Node.js-powered systems. Learn how they are adapting their services to be autonomous, loosely-coupled and highly-available by applying the principles of event-driven architecture.
James Pearce (Facebook)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Open source has always been a huge part of Facebook's culture. But in 2013, we rebooted our portfolio and launched a unique suite of internal tools & instrumentation to support hundreds of repos, thousands of engineers, and tens of thousands of contributors. The result? Better-than-ever community adoption - and an open & responsible stewardship, attuned to our ethos of hacking & moving fast.
Nick Sullivan (CloudFlare)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Red October is an open source encryption server with a twist -- it can encrypt secrets, requiring more than one person to decrypt them. This talk will describe what goes into building an open source security product and using it in the real world. From motivation, design decisions, pitfalls of using a young programming language like Go, through deployment and opening the work up to the community.
Adam Culp (Zend Technologies)
Slides:   external link
Refactoring code (altering code to make it cleaner, simpler, and often faster, while not sacrificing functionality) We hate to do it, so learn how to do it better. Covers: When to refactor. How to refactor. Why refactor. How refactor can help us write better code. Common methodology for refactoring.
Mark Lavin (Caktus Consulting Group)
Slides:   external link
Have you ever written or used an API wrapper for a webservice? REST is a client-server architecture model and building the server is only half of the challenge. This talk will walk through some of the challenges of building a REST client, describe some best practices and some patterns to avoid, and discuss how we can all work to build better APIs for an open web.
Dustin Whittle (AppDynamics)
Slides:   1-PDF 
PHP is used by the likes of Facebook, Yahoo, Zynga, Tumblr, Etsy, and Wikipedia. How do the largest internet companies scale PHP to meet their demand? Join this session and find out how to use the latest tools in PHP for developing high performance applications. We’ll take a look at common techniques for scaling PHP applications and best practices for profiling and optimizing performance.
Jerome Petazzoni (Docker Inc.)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Since its first release in early 2013, Docker has been deployed successfully to implement continuous integration and testing environments, where the very fast lifecycle of containers gives them an edge over virtual machines. We will see how to extend the workflow from development to testing and all the way to production. We'll also address challenges like reliability and scaling with Docker.
Piers Cawley (Thermeon)
Keynote by Piers Cawley, Perl programmer, singer and balloon modeller.
Greg Bulmash (Microsoft.com)
Slides:   1-BIN 
Most Saturday mornings, Greg Bulmash brings together 70-80 boys and girls, dozens of parents and volunteers, and they teach the kids to code at a free club called CoderDojo. Come learn how to start a CoderDojo in your city and join the hundreds of cities around the world where kids are learning everything from 'hello world' to NodeCopters to building apps.
Michael Bleigh (Divshot)
Slides:   external link
A combination of open standards, open source projects, and evolving browser technologies have made static web apps an increasingly appealing target even for complex applications. Learn how you can “go static” and why you might want to do so.
Rachel Nabors (rachelnabors.com)
You may not feel like you’re a “creative person,” but never underestimate where your code could turn up or what stories it might tell. The most unassuming repo can be remixed into something magnificent.
Ethan Dereszynski (Webtrends), Eric Butler (Cedexis)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
Visitors to an online store rarely make their intention explicit. A valuable goal in digital marketing is to infer this intention so to influence the visitor's behavior in-situ. We describe a data-driven approach to identifying and predicting online user behavior. The talk focuses on the construction of real-time machine learning tools for inference to sites with thousands of concurrent visitors.
Josh Barratt (Media Temple)
Slides:   external link
As technologists, sometimes it’s as important to be able to share information with others as to be able to actually build something. IPython notebook is a powerful tool to both experiment with code (and data) and share the results with others, technical and non-technical alike. This session introduces the notebook and gives examples and techniques for using it effectively.
Daniel Juyung Seo (Samsung Electronics)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Tizen is aimed at various profiles, not only mobile. The UI must be scalable and themeable to support these diverse profiles. This presentation will share the technology behind the scalable and themeable Tizen UI which is called EFL (Enlightenment Foundation Libraries). This will reduce development time tremendously to support multiple products and applications.
Alejandro Cabrera (Rackspace Hosting Inc.)
Slides:   1-FILE 
We're building ever larger and more complex systems. Coupled with changing requirements and demands for scaling concurrency and parallelism, taming this complexity is no small order. Allow me to share my excitement with you! I'll show you how Haskell helps tame this complexity, allows you to overcome the challenges of modern software, and make predictions about what the near future holds.
In this presentation Andrew will be live-coding the generative algorithms that will be producing the music that the audience will be listening too. As Andrew is typing he will also attempt to narrate the journey, discussing the various computational and musical choices made along the way. A must see for anyone interested in creative computing.
Clinton Dreisbach (The Iron Yard), Bridget Hillyer (Self)
Slides:   external link
Clojure: it's a Lisp that runs on the JVM and it's gotten a lot of buzz in the last few years. What is it actually good for? In this tutorial, you'll learn about Clojure's radically simple approach to data and state and how it can help you build real-world projects from web applications to servers to mobile apps.
Jarret Raim (Rackspace), Paul Kehrer (Rackspace)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Python has a complex past with crypto. There are half a dozen frameworks built on at least three separate C implementations, each with their own strengths and weaknesses and in various states of maintenance. This presentation will review the current state of the art and discuss the future of crypto in Python including a new library aimed at fixing modern crypto support in Python.
Shadaj Laddad (School)
Kids can start to learn to program at any age; I started at six. All I needed was tools, guidance, and encouragement. Once I got hooked, a whole new world of possibilities opened up for me. I could create my own video games instead of being restricted by the rules of games made by others.
Tim Bray (Independent)
What do you care about most in the worlds of software, the Net, and Life Online? Are you worried about it? Now is the time for sensible, reasonable, extreme paranoia.
Tim O'Reilly (O'Reilly Media, Inc.)
Keynote by Tim O'Reilly, founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media.
William Cox (Distil Networks)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
In this talk we'll explore the Fourier transform and FIR filters in an intuitive way to make it accessible. You'll come out with the ability to look at your time-series data in a new way and explore new uses for otherwise useless data.
Chris Smith (Portland Transport)
Slides:   1-PDF 
At OSCON 2011 we introduced the Transit Appliance, a project to use open hardware, open source software and open APIs to create a low-cost display for transit arrivals. Three years later we have two dozen displays deployed in the community, have seen the retirement of the Chumby, the rise of the Raspberry Pi and many new web services enriching the display. Progress and lessons learned.
Deb Nicholson (Open Invention Network)
Slides:   external link
There's been a lot of talk about patent trolls, but how can the free and open source software community address the more complicated (and potentially more damaging) problem of anti-competitive litigation?
Francisco Souza (Globo.com)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Tsuru is an open source, component oriented PaaS. It allows developers to focus on writing, testing and deploying applications in an easier way, without worrying how they get deployed in a server. Its key features include easy extensibility, a fully open source stack and graceful handling of failures. This talk aims to introduce Tsuru and its components, showing how they work together.
C. Aaron Cois (Carnegie Mellon University, Software Engineering Institute), Tim Palko (Carnegie Mellon University, Software Engineering Institute)
Slides:   external link
In this tutorial, we’ll explore three unique technologies, and accompanying use cases, for Node.js development. We’ll divide the tutorial into three one-hour segments, in which you will develop three different Node.js-powered applications.
Tim Mackey (Citrix Systems)
Slides:   external link
Apache CloudStack enables cloud operators to quickly create scalable clouds with support for multiple hypervisors. Choice is wonderful, but also requires an understanding of how hypervisor features integrate with CloudStack. In this session we'll look at the options and provide a template for deployment success.
Drasko Draskovic (nodesign.net)
Slides:   1-PPT 
WeIO is an innovative Open Source hardware and software platform for Internet of Things that allows the creation of wirelessly connected objects using popular web languages such as HTML5 or Python. All further details can be found on project's web-site: http://we-io.net.
Slides:   1-PDF 
Asynchronous frameworks like Tornado, Twisted, and Node are increasingly important for writing high-performance web applications. Even if you’re an experienced web programmer, you may lack a rigorous understanding of how these frameworks work and when to use them. See how Tornado's event loop works, and learn how to efficiently handle very large numbers of concurrent connections.
Keith Fiske (OmniTI, Inc)
Slides:   1-PDF 
After using PostgreSQL for a while, you realize that there are missing features that would make it significantly easier to use in large production environments. Thankfully, it's extremely easy to make add-ons to enable some of those features right now, even without knowing C! This talk will discuss projects I've worked on and show how easy it is to make an impact in the PostgreSQL community.
Slides:   external link
In this session we'll look at how design effects an open source project and how to encourage designers to contribute. We'll also cover the fundamentals of design, in case a developer finds themselves in the role of designer.
Sarah White (Asciidoctor, OpenDevise)
Slides:   external link
Documentation is paramount to increasing an open source project's adoption and growth. But writing good documentation is hard. Using examples from new and mature projects, we'll explore detailed tactics for selecting, prioritizing, outlining, and writing documentation targeted at multiple audiences.
Kristen Dedeaux (Kristen Dedeaux Consulting )
Slides:   1-PDF 
So you know Java, Scala, Python, and Perl, but do you know the correct usage of a semicolon when it comes to the English language? Writers and engineers alike often fall victim to grammatical blunders that can obscure their intended message. Fortunately, there are some simple ways of spotting and correcting these errors. Once learned, your writing will improve and your readers will thank you.
Tobias Zander (Sitewards GmbH)
Slides:   1-PDF 
You might know about XSS and usual SQL injection, but time has changed and we have to keep up-to-date with the latest attack scenarios. Do you also know what a clickjacking is? If not I'll show you how to protect against it. I'll also present techniques like Perfect Pixel Timing and a combination of xss/time-based-sql-injection to access intranet sites, which are not even compromised.
Beth Flanagan (Intel Corp.)
As more and more atypical devices are internet enabled, operating system providers need to look at the longer term impacts and plan accordingly. How can CE manufactures keep devices up to date and secure over the lifetime of the device. What does it look like when we fail to plan to do so? How can the open source way solve some of these problems.
Matthew Garrett (Nebula)
Slides:   1-BIN 
Software development is easy. You tell a computer to do something. It does it. Someone sends you a packet. The OS receives it. Things don't happen unless you ask them to. Simple. But what if that wasn't true? What if your computer is full of hidden magic? What if your hardware makes assumptions about your software? Vendors wouldn't do that, would they? (Spoiler: Yes, they would)