Skip to main content

OSCON 2014 Schedule

Below are the confirmed and scheduled talks at OSCON 2014
(schedule subject to change).

Customize Your Own Schedule

Create your own OSCON schedule using the personal scheduler function. Mark the tutorials, sessions, keynotes, and events you want to attend by selecting the calendar icon [calendar icon] next to each listing. Then go to your personal schedule and get your own customized schedule generated.

DIY OSCON Schedule

OSCON attendees like to do things their way. And if something isn't the way they want it, they're gonna build it for themselves. We've opened our raw schedule data so you can build your own schedule. Go ahead, make it better.

Portland Ballroom
Add Programmer, Program, Machine and Environment to your personal schedule
10:00am Programmer, Program, Machine and Environment Andrew Sorensen (QUT)
Add Healthcare for Geeks to your personal schedule
11:00am Healthcare for Geeks David Uhlman (clearhealth inc.)
Portland 251
Add Apache Cordova: Past, Present and Future to your personal schedule
10:00am Apache Cordova: Past, Present and Future Joe Bowser (Adobe Systems)
Add React's Architecture to your personal schedule
11:50am React's Architecture Christopher Chedeau (Facebook)
Portland 252
Add Making maps with OpenStreetMap and Koop to your personal schedule
11:00am Making maps with OpenStreetMap and Koop Christopher Helm (GeoIQ), Andrew Turner (Esri)
Portland 255
Add Thinking in a Highly Concurrent, Mostly-functional Language to your personal schedule
10:00am Thinking in a Highly Concurrent, Mostly-functional Language Francesco Cesarini (Erlang Solutions Ltd)
Portland 256
Add When PostgreSQL Can't, You Can to your personal schedule
10:00am When PostgreSQL Can't, You Can Keith Fiske (OmniTI, Inc)
Add ETL: The Dirty Little Secret of Data Science to your personal schedule
11:00am ETL: The Dirty Little Secret of Data Science Byron Ruth (The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia)
Add Quantifying your Fitness to your personal schedule
11:50am Quantifying your Fitness Kirsten Hunter (Akamai), Kjerstin Williams (Applied Minds)
D135
Add Adventures in the WebRTC Garden--or is it Wilderness? to your personal schedule
10:00am Adventures in the WebRTC Garden--or is it Wilderness? Brian Capouch (Saint Josephs College), Nathan Samano (Saint Joseph's College (Indiana)), Alex Yong (Saint Joseph's College (Indiana)), Steven Quella (Saint Joseph's College (Indiana)), Danilo Zekovic (Saint Joseph's College (Indiana))
Add Marketing Your Tech Talent  to your personal schedule
11:50am Marketing Your Tech Talent Deirdré Straughan (Ericsson)
D136
Add Identity Crisis: Are We Really Who We Say We Are? to your personal schedule
10:00am Identity Crisis: Are We Really Who We Say We Are? Karen Sandler (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Add Apache HTTP Server; SSL from End-to-End to your personal schedule
11:00am Apache HTTP Server; SSL from End-to-End William A Rowe Jr (Pivotal)
Add OAuth2: The Swiss-Army Framework to your personal schedule
11:50am OAuth2: The Swiss-Army Framework Brent Shaffer (Adobe Systems Inc)
D137/138
Add Big Data Analysis 0-60 in 90 days to your personal schedule
11:00am Big Data Analysis 0-60 in 90 days Chad Naber (Intel), David Elfi (Intel Corporation)
Add From Madison Avenue to git Checkout -- A Journey to your personal schedule
11:50am From Madison Avenue to git Checkout -- A Journey Elaine Marino (LadyCoder Productions), Jessica Goulding (Self-Employed)
D139/140
Add What is Async, How Does it Work, and When Should I Use it? to your personal schedule
11:00am What is Async, How Does it Work, and When Should I Use it? A. Jesse Jiryu Davis (MongoDB)
Add Inside the Go Tour to your personal schedule
11:50am Inside the Go Tour Francesc Campoy Flores (Google Inc.)
E144
Add Let Them Be Your Heroes to your personal schedule
10:00am Let Them Be Your Heroes Francesca Krihely (MongoDB)
Add OSCON Town Hall to your personal schedule
11:50am OSCON Town Hall Gina Blaber (O'Reilly Media, Inc.), Matthew McCullough (GitHub, Inc.), Sarah Novotny (NGINX), Simon St. Laurent (O'Reilly Media, Inc.)
E145
Add Idiomatic APIs with the Python Data Model to your personal schedule
10:00am Idiomatic APIs with the Python Data Model Luciano Ramalho (Python.pro.br)
Add Python: Encapsulation with Descriptors to your personal schedule
11:00am Python: Encapsulation with Descriptors Luciano Ramalho (Python.pro.br)
Add The State of Crypto in Python to your personal schedule
11:50am The State of Crypto in Python Jarret Raim (Rackspace), Paul Kehrer (Rackspace)
E146
Add HA 101 with OpenStack to your personal schedule
10:00am HA 101 with OpenStack Raghavan Srinivas (Independent)
Add DNSSEC Via a New Stub Resolver to your personal schedule
11:00am DNSSEC Via a New Stub Resolver Allison Mankin (Verisign, Inc.), Willem Toorop (NLNet Labs), Neel Goyal (Verisign, Inc.), Glen Wiley (Verisign, Inc.)
Add Why You Should Be Looking at Functional Web Development to your personal schedule
11:50am Why You Should Be Looking at Functional Web Development Adam Granicz (IntelliFactory)
E147/148
Add Hacking Lessons: Which Micro-Controller Board Do I Use? to your personal schedule
10:00am Hacking Lessons: Which Micro-Controller Board Do I Use? Rob Reilly (Rob Reilly Consulting)
Add WeIO Platform for Internet of Things to your personal schedule
11:00am WeIO Platform for Internet of Things Drasko DRASKOVIC (nodesign.net)
Add Hacking the Kernel, Hacking Myself to your personal schedule
11:50am Hacking the Kernel, Hacking Myself Kelley Nielsen (Linux Foundation, Gnome Foundation)
F150
Add Chef and OpenStack to your personal schedule
10:00am Chef and OpenStack Matt Ray (Chef Software, Inc.)
Add Nymote: Git Your Own Cloud Here to your personal schedule
11:00am Nymote: Git Your Own Cloud Here Anil Madhavapeddy (University of Cambridge), Richard Mortier (University of Nottingham)
Add Creating an SDK - Lessons Learned to your personal schedule
11:50am Creating an SDK - Lessons Learned Ed Leafe (Rackspace)
F151
Add DevOps for University Students to your personal schedule
10:00am DevOps for University Students Lance Albertson (Oregon State University Open Source Lab), Emily Dunham (Oregon State University Open Source Lab)
Add Open edX: an Open-source MOOC Platform to your personal schedule
11:00am Open edX: an Open-source MOOC Platform James Tauber (edX), David Baumgold (edX)
Add Writing Documentation that Satisfies Your Users to your personal schedule
11:50am Writing Documentation that Satisfies Your Users Sarah White (Asciidoctor, OpenDevise)
Add Announcements & Keynotes to your personal schedule
9:00am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Announcements & Keynotes Matthew McCullough (GitHub, Inc.), Sarah Novotny (NGINX), Simon St. Laurent (O'Reilly Media, Inc.)
Add The Concert Programmer to your personal schedule
9:05am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
The Concert Programmer Andrew Sorensen (QUT)
Add Yes, Your Refrigerator Is Trying To Kill You: Bad Actors and the Internet of Things to your personal schedule
9:20am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Yes, Your Refrigerator Is Trying To Kill You: Bad Actors and the Internet of Things Beth Flanagan (Intel Corp.)
Add Open Manufacturing:  Bringing Open Hardware Beyond 3D Printing to your personal schedule
9:30am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Open Manufacturing: Bringing Open Hardware Beyond 3D Printing Ryan Vinyard (Highway1)
Add Storytelling on the Shoulders of Giants to your personal schedule
9:40am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Storytelling on the Shoulders of Giants Rachel Nabors (rachelnabors.com)
Add O'Reilly Open Source Awards to your personal schedule
12:40pm Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
O'Reilly Open Source Awards
Add Open Source and Social Change — Making the World a Better Place to your personal schedule
12:45pm Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Open Source and Social Change — Making the World a Better Place Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
10:40am Morning Break
Room: Portland Ballroom Foyer
Add Closing Get Together to your personal schedule
1:15pm Event
Room: Portland Ballroom Foyer
Closing Get Together
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Main Stage
Programmer, Program, Machine and Environment
Andrew Sorensen (QUT)
In this talk, Andrew will delve deeper into the technical and philosophical underpinnings of live-coding as an artistic performance practice. Using his own Extempore language as a reference, Andrew will demonstrate, in a very hands on way, how live-coding works in practice, from both an end-user perspective, as well as a systems design perspective.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Main Stage
Healthcare for Geeks
David Uhlman (clearhealth inc.)
Hacking Healthcare author David Uhlman will show you how to 3D print your body parts, order your own lab work, build a DNA analyzer, tour an array of personal monitoring devices for fitness, health and open biology projects, stop eating altogether by switching to soylent. Also tips on what insurance to get, navigating hospitals and finding the right doctor.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Main Stage, Open Hardware
Arduino + Furby Broken Build Notification - Oh, You'll Want to Fix it Quick!
Tina Coleman (Next Century Corporation)
Furby's are back and more annoying than ever. Forget about a traffic light flashing or an email. When that Furby starts jabbering, you'll do ANYTHING to fix that build quickly. This talk will connect an Arduino board with Jenkins continuous integration framework and out to the Furby to let it annoy your development team, rather than you!
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Mobile Platforms
Apache Cordova: Past, Present and Future
Joe Bowser (Adobe Systems)
A review of the past six years of Apache Cordova development, starting from its origins as PhoneGap, to its donation to the Apache Software Foundation, told from the point of view of its longest running contributor. This will include a simple introduction to cross-platform hybrid applications on iOS and Android, and their evolution.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Emerging Languages
Mobile and Multi-Device Web Development with Tritium
Ishan Anand (Moovweb)
Tritium is a new open source language from the creator of the popular Sass and HAML languages that brings a modern approach to web development with transforms. In this talk, we'll introduce the Tritium language and the power of transform based approaches for separating content from presentation in the building of multi-device websites for desktops, smartphones, tablets, TVs, wearables and beyond.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) JavaScript - HTML5 - Web
React's Architecture
Christopher Chedeau (Facebook)
React is a JavaScript library for building user interfaces developed by Facebook and Instagram. It has a novel rendering architecture that we're going to explore in this talk.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) JavaScript - HTML5 - Web
Leaflet, Node.JS, and MongoDB for an Easy and Fun Web Mapping Experience
Steven Pousty (Red Hat)
You have seen the stuff that FourSquare has done with spatial and you want some of that hotness for your app. We will load some data into MongoDB, show you how to handle spatial and finally plug in in some Node.JS JavaScript code to build simple REST services to query your data. Finally we will show how to use the REST service with OpenStreetMap and Leaflet for a fully interactive map.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) JavaScript - HTML5 - Web
Making maps with OpenStreetMap and Koop
Christopher Helm (GeoIQ) et al
Like maps and open data? Koop has created a new way of accessing open data and making cool maps with wide variety of data
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
A Presentation Toolbox that Just Might Blow Your Audience Away
Florian Haas (hastexo)
Still building presentations in an office suite? That's so 2013! Today, you can build awesome, engaging presentations that run in your browser or on your phone, using nothing but HTML5 and a few clever JavaScript libraries. And it's super simple! This talk shows you how.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Computational Thinking
Thinking in a Highly Concurrent, Mostly-functional Language
Francesco Cesarini (Erlang Solutions Ltd)
The actor model has received much attention because of its scalable and intuitive approach to concurrency. But the notion of concurrency is as fundamental to certain languages as object-orientation is to Java. In this talk, we will describe the evolution of concurrent thinking in Erlang, providing valuable lessons for Go, Rust, Elixir and AKKA developers who will undertake a similar journey..
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Computational Thinking
Big Data Pipeline and Analytics Platform Using NetflixOSS and Other Open Source Libraries
Sudhir Tonse (Netflix) et al
This session presents the data platform used at Netflix for event collection, aggregation, and analysis. The platform helps Netflix process and analyze billions of events every day. Attendees will learn how to assemble their own large-scale data pipeline/analytics platform using open source software from NetflixOSS and others, such as Kafka, ElasticSearch, Druid from Metamarkets, and Hive.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Computational Thinking
Map, Flatmap and Reduce are Your New Best Friends: Simpler Collections, Concurrency, and Big Data
Chris Richardson (Chris Richardson Consulting, Inc)
Higher-order functions such as map(), flatmap(), filter() and reduce() have their origins in mathematics and ancient functional programming languages such as Lisp. But today they have become mainstream and are available in languages such as JavaScript, Scala and Java 8. Learn how to they can be used to simplify code in a variety of domains including collection processing, concurrency and big data.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Databases & Datastores
When PostgreSQL Can't, You Can
Keith Fiske (OmniTI, Inc)
After using PostgreSQL for a while, you realize that there are missing features that would make it significantly easier to use in large production environments. Thankfully, it's extremely easy to make add-ons to enable some of those features right now, even without knowing C! This talk will discuss projects I've worked on and show how easy it is to make an impact in the PostgreSQL community.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Databases & Datastores
ETL: The Dirty Little Secret of Data Science
Byron Ruth (The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia)
There is an adage that given enough data, a data scientist can answer the world's questions. The untold truth is that the majority of work happens during the ETL and data preprocessing phase. In this talk I discuss Origins, an open source Python library for extracting and mapping structural metadata across heterogenous data stores.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
Quantifying your Fitness
Kirsten Hunter (Akamai) et al
The Quantified Self movement is all about keeping measurements about your life in order to track progress in various ways. As geeks we all enjoy playing with new toys, and there are a variety of devices and applications out there to help measure steps, activity and fitness. Combining the data from these devices can help you build tools to track your fitness in a way that makes sense for you.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Emerging Languages
Adventures in the WebRTC Garden--or is it Wilderness?
Brian Capouch (Saint Josephs College) et al
The prospects and promise of webRTC--direct browser-to-browser multimedia communications--have led to an explosion of tools, both proprietary and Open Source. In this session we present an overview of a variety of tools vying for attention, along with a demonstration of the sipML Javascript toolkit, using webRTC-enabled browsers and the latest version of Asterisk.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Geek Lifestyle
My Friends Keep Leaving and it is Ruining Board Games Day
Tim Nugent (Freelance)
These days, moving away doesn’t put too much of a dampener on staying in touch with your friends. Unfortunately, it has had a severe effect on my regular board games day. So, I thought, why not solve this problem with telepresence board gaming? Can’t be too hard! This session will cover what's been done, and what problems are still out there I have no idea about how to solve?
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
Marketing Your Tech Talent
Deirdré Straughan (Ericsson)
Today's tech job descriptions want 'superstars', but most companies – and employees! – still treat employee talent as a replaceable commodity. How can you market yourself and your talents, to benefit your own career as well as the company or project you work for? This talk will provide practical ideas and real-life case studies, based on years of experience helping geeks communicate what they do.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Business, Community
Identity Crisis: Are We Really Who We Say We Are?
Karen Sandler (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Karen Sandler, Executive Director of the GNOME Foundation, will discuss the peculiar tension in the intersection of free and open source software and corporate interest.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Security
Apache HTTP Server; SSL from End-to-End
William A Rowe Jr (Pivotal)
This presentation covers all aspects of configuring Apache HTTP Server for https/TLS, including ECC, RSA and DH keys and key strength, cipher suites, SSL session caches vs. session tickets, OCSP stapling and TLS virtual hostnames. These elements are integrated to provide perfect forward secrecy and meet modern best practices for both client and proxied connections.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Security
OAuth2: The Swiss-Army Framework
Brent Shaffer (Adobe Systems Inc)
If your application doesn't have APIs, it's probably written in Cold Fusion. Every application has APIs, and APIs need authentication. See how OAuth2 is robust enough to satisfy the demands of the enterprise, while still serving the smallest of side projects.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Business, JavaScript - HTML5 - Web
Satisfying Business and Engineering Requirements: Client-server JavaScript, SEO, and Optimized Page Load
Jason Strimpel (WalmartLabs)
Often business and developer needs are at odds when developing public facing websites that need to be indexed. Business is concerned with factors such as SEO, visitor retention and bounce rates, while engineering is concerned with developer ergonomics, re-usage, separation of concerns, and maintenance. This talk will describe a solution that satisfies both business and engineering requirements.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Databases & Datastores
Big Data Analysis 0-60 in 90 days
Chad Naber (Intel) et al
Do you know how long could it take to your team start producing value in the Big Data and Machine Learning area? This talk shows a real team experience starting from scratch to a functional Big Data and Machine Learning platform using several open source tools such as Apache Hadoop, Apache Hive and Python frameworks SciPy/Numpy/scikit-learn
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Community, Education
From Madison Avenue to git Checkout -- A Journey
Elaine Marino (LadyCoder Productions) et al
This talk is going to provide insight into what’s it’s like to view Software Development as an outsider, who happens to be an experienced successful professional. I will also tackle the issues that are implicit with imposter syndrome, such as how to grow developers, how to grow diversity, fixing broken hiring practices, and what it’s like to be afraid of open source.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Java & JVM, Tools & Techniques
Developing Micro-services with Java and Spring
Phil Webb (Pivotal)
With plenty of live code and demos, this talk will show you how incredibly easy it is to write Java micro-services with modern Spring. We will walk though the process of creating a simple REST service, discuss deployment options and talk about how self-contained, stand-alone applications work in production.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Python
What is Async, How Does it Work, and When Should I Use it?
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis (MongoDB)
Asynchronous frameworks like Tornado, Twisted, and Node are increasingly important for writing high-performance web applications. Even if you’re an experienced web programmer, you may lack a rigorous understanding of how these frameworks work and when to use them. See how Tornado's event loop works, and learn how to efficiently handle very large numbers of concurrent connections.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Security
Inside the Go Tour
Francesc Campoy Flores (Google Inc.)
One of the most important tools created to help people learn Go is the Go tour (http://tour.golang.org) It allows the user to learn the basics of Go and put them in practice directly on their browsers, running code without installing any compiler. Implementing this in a safe way is not an easy task! In this talk I present some techniques used to make sure everything goes as expected.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Community
Let Them Be Your Heroes
Francesca Krihely (MongoDB)
How can you encourage involvement and participation in Open Source? They key is through empowerment. We'll discuss how to empower and encourage more people to participate in your open source project by enabling Heroism. This talk will also discuss issues of diversity and inclusion.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Community
International Community Building: Bridging Japan and the Rest of the World
Kiyoto Tamura (Treasure Data)
Japan has a thriving open source technology community. It’s also the third largest IT market in the world, with more engineers per capita than the US, and a history of game-changing open source projects like Ruby and Jenkins. Hear a first hand account of managing and cultivating open source communities in Japan, the US and other countries and discuss international community building.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Keynotes
OSCON Town Hall
Gina Blaber (O'Reilly Media, Inc.) et al
OSCON belongs to its attendees, and we want to hear what you think of this year’s show. Join the organizers to talk about what you loved and hated about OSCON, and what you’d like to see next year.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Python
Idiomatic APIs with the Python Data Model
Luciano Ramalho (Python.pro.br)
The key to writing Pythonic classes, APIs and frameworks is leveraging the Python Data Model: a set of interfaces which, when implemented in your classes, enables them to leverage fundamental language features such as iteration, context managers, infix operators, attribute access control etc. This talk shows how, through a diverse selection of examples.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Python
Python: Encapsulation with Descriptors
Luciano Ramalho (Python.pro.br)
Python has no private fields, but the property decorator lets you replace public attributes with getters and setters without breaking client code. And the descriptor mechanism, used in Django for model field declarations, enables wide reuse of getter/setter logic via composition instead of inheritance. This talk explains how properties and descriptors work by refactoring a practical example.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Python
The State of Crypto in Python
Jarret Raim (Rackspace) et al
Python has a complex past with crypto. There are half a dozen frameworks built on at least three separate C implementations, each with their own strengths and weaknesses and in various states of maintenance. This presentation will review the current state of the art and discuss the future of crypto in Python including a new library aimed at fixing modern crypto support in Python.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Cloud
HA 101 with OpenStack
Raghavan Srinivas (Independent)
There are a number of interrelated concepts which make the understanding and implementation of HA complex. The potential for not implementing HA correctly would be disastrous. This session will use demos to reinforce the concepts and how to connect the dots using OpenStack infrastructure as an example although the lessons learned can be used for implementing HA in general.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Security
DNSSEC Via a New Stub Resolver
Allison Mankin (Verisign, Inc.) et al
The need for secure DNS is more pressing than ever but the current standard API for using the DNS can't take advantage of modern DNS features. We will give an application developers view of DNSSEC and describe the independently written getDNS API specification. We will showcase the open source implementation of the specification built by our team of developers from NLNet Labs and Verisign.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Emerging Languages
Why You Should Be Looking at Functional Web Development
Adam Granicz (IntelliFactory)
Web combined with functional programming gives pure awesomeness. Come and learn about WebSharper, an open source web development framework for F#, and how it makes programmers happier and more productive.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Open Hardware
Hacking Lessons: Which Micro-Controller Board Do I Use?
Rob Reilly (Rob Reilly Consulting)
It's a great time to be a hardware hacker. What started with the Arduino has now evolved to the Raspberry Pi, the BeagleBone Black, the Spark Core, the new Arduino Yun, and a host of other boards. How do you know which one is right for your project? This talk will compare the mainstream boards, how they are applied and help you decide which one best fits your needs.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Open Hardware
WeIO Platform for Internet of Things
Drasko DRASKOVIC (nodesign.net)
WeIO is an innovative Open Source hardware and software platform for Internet of Things that allows the creation of wirelessly connected objects using popular web languages such as HTML5 or Python. All further details can be found on project's web-site: http://we-io.net.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
Hacking the Kernel, Hacking Myself
Kelley Nielsen (Linux Foundation, Gnome Foundation)
I was chosen, out of eighteen successful applicants, to be one of four Linux kernel interns through the Gnome Outreach Program for Women. This is the story of my journey from a frustrated retail worker, dreaming of writing code for a living, to a full fledged kernel developer.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Operations & System Administration
Chef and OpenStack
Matt Ray (Chef Software, Inc.)
The open source configuration management and automation framework Chef is used to configure, deploy and manage many large public and private installations of OpenStack and supports a wide variety of integration opportunities. OpenStack is a large and complex ecosystem, this session will highlight the Chef resources available for developers and operators.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Cloud
Nymote: Git Your Own Cloud Here
Anil Madhavapeddy (University of Cambridge) et al
If you want to run your own Internet node, it requires gluing together an awful lot of software, and maintaining it. We'll show you a fresh approach: use the Mirage operating system to easily compile the protocols you need (DNS, HTTP, XMPP and IMAP) for your Internet presence into a type-safe unikernel, and deploy the whole thing using just Travis CI and Git directly on the cloud or on ARM.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Cloud
Creating an SDK - Lessons Learned
Ed Leafe (Rackspace)
Taking a complex API and wrapping it to create a coherent SDK for a programming language is a huge undertaking, and even harder when it has to be done by a single developer. I created pyrax, the Python SDK for OpenStack, at the request of my company. It has been a success, but it didn't come easy. In this talk I'll share some of the many lessons learned, both technical and political.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Operations & System Administration
DevOps for University Students
Lance Albertson (Oregon State University Open Source Lab) et al
University students rarely get a chance to fully embrace the Devops or FOSS development culture while in school. This year, we’ve started a program called Devops Bootcamp, which is a hands-on, informal workshop open to any student at OSU. Devops Bootcamp immerses college students in the basics of Linux, Linux system administration and FOSS development practices.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Education
Open edX: an Open-source MOOC Platform
James Tauber (edX) et al
Open edX is an open-source platform for delivering online courses. It's in use by the 31 member universities of edx.org (Harvard, MIT, Berkeley, etc), as well as Stanford, Google, and many other colleges and universities. This talk will describe the platform and show you ways to participate, as a course author, tool developer, or offering institution.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) User Experience
Writing Documentation that Satisfies Your Users
Sarah White (Asciidoctor, OpenDevise)
Documentation is paramount to increasing an open source project's adoption and growth. But writing good documentation is hard. Using examples from new and mature projects, we'll explore detailed tactics for selecting, prioritizing, outlining, and writing documentation targeted at multiple audiences.
9:00am-9:05am (5m)
Announcements & Keynotes
Matthew McCullough (GitHub, Inc.) et al
Thursday announcements and remarks by OSCON program chairs, Matthew McCullough, Sarah Novotny and Simon St. Laurent. We'll be announcing more keynote speakers here soon.
9:05am-9:20am (15m) Keynotes
The Concert Programmer
Andrew Sorensen (QUT)
In this presentation Andrew will be live-coding the generative algorithms that will be producing the music that the audience will be listening too. As Andrew is typing he will also attempt to narrate the journey, discussing the various computational and musical choices made along the way. A must see for anyone interested in creative computing.
9:20am-9:30am (10m) Keynotes
Yes, Your Refrigerator Is Trying To Kill You: Bad Actors and the Internet of Things
Beth Flanagan (Intel Corp.)
As more and more atypical devices are internet enabled, operating system providers need to look at the longer term impacts and plan accordingly. How can CE manufactures keep devices up to date and secure over the lifetime of the device. What does it look like when we fail to plan to do so? How can the open source way solve some of these problems.
9:30am-9:40am (10m) Keynotes
Open Manufacturing: Bringing Open Hardware Beyond 3D Printing
Ryan Vinyard (Highway1)
Open source design has been a recent trend in hardware, but it tends to be limited to open libraries of 3D-printable parts. These are geared at makers, artists, hobbyists, and whoever else really wants to print their own figurines, not necessarily the engineering community.
9:40am-9:50am (10m) Keynotes
Storytelling on the Shoulders of Giants
Rachel Nabors (rachelnabors.com)
You may not feel like you’re a “creative person,” but never underestimate where your code could turn up or what stories it might tell. The most unassuming repo can be remixed into something magnificent.
12:40pm-12:45pm (5m) Keynotes
O'Reilly Open Source Awards
The 10th Annual O’Reilly Open Source Award winners will be announced.
12:45pm-1:10pm (25m) Keynotes
Open Source and Social Change — Making the World a Better Place
Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
Keynote by Paul Fenwick, managing director of Perl Training Australia.
10:40am-11:00am (20m)
Break: Morning Break
1:15pm-2:00pm (45m) Events
Closing Get Together
Take the opportunity to network one last time and exchange contact information with one another. Drinks and snacks provided.