Personal schedule for Kenneth Power

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Data
Location: D137/138
Josh Berkus (PostgreSQL Experts, Inc.)
Average rating: ****.
(4.32, 22 ratings)
So, you've inherited a PostgreSQL server. Congratulations? Thanks to Postgres' popularity as the database for new applications, thousands of developers, system administrators and devops are finding themselves in charge of PostgreSQL servers with no idea what to do next. This tutorial will cover the essentials. Read more.
Programming
Location: Portland 256
Francesc Campoy Flores (Google Inc.)
Average rating: **...
(2.20, 25 ratings)
Go is an open source programming language, developed at Google. Optimized for systems programming, Go combines the ease of a dynamic language with the safety of a statically compiled language, along with support for networked and multicore programming. Read more.
User Experience (UX)
Location: D137/138
Denise Paolucci (Dreamwidth Studios), Deborah Kaplan (Dreamwidth Studios)
Average rating: ***..
(3.64, 14 ratings)
An extensive look at simple, practical, concrete methods to make your website or webapp more accessible for people with disabilities and in all forms of assistive technology. Participants will leave with a number of tips, tricks, and tools they can use on any site, no matter how simple or fancy it is -- and a number of examples of doing it incorrectly. Read more.
Tools and Techniques
Location: D139/140
Dan Allen (OpenDevise), Sarah White (Asciidoctor, OpenDevise)
Average rating: **...
(2.60, 15 ratings)
Writing e-mail is easy. We do it all the time. But it only reaches a limited audience. Writing documentation is hard. We don't do it as often. But online documentation can reach an unlimited audience. Attend this session to learn how lightweight markup makes documentation easier, static site generators make websites simpler and GitHub makes collaborating on content and publishing it online faster. Read more.
Programming, Tools and Techniques
Location: Portland 255
Garrett Smith (CloudBees)
Average rating: ***..
(3.33, 39 ratings)
How do you know you've written a good program? There are a couple standards most people use: "works for me" and "all tests pass". If you can get to that point, you're code is in pretty good shape! This talk will go beyond "it works" to explore a programming technique where problems are systematically made obvious and code naturally becomes correct, clear, and maintainable! Read more.
Tools and Techniques
Location: E145
Laura Thomson (Mozilla Corporation)
Average rating: ****.
(4.60, 20 ratings)
Deployment can be a real bugbear for many web developers. From building something easy to deploy and manage; to coming up with a repeatable, consistent process; to continuous deployment…deployment can keep you up at night for months on end. In this talk I'll go through how to get better at deployment, best practices, and lessons learned. Read more.
Business
Location: D137/138
Camille Fournier (Rent the Runway)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 18 ratings)
Most companies large and small have shared internal libraries and systems. But ownership of that code often falls onto people with different priorities than the users of the code. We will discuss how you can use open source practices to run internal code bases effectively, provide learning opportunities for employees, and improve your final products. Read more.
Java & JVM
Location: Portland Ballroom
Neal Ford (ThoughtWorks)
Average rating: ****.
(4.05, 42 ratings)
Learning the syntax of a new language is easy, but learning to think under a different paradigm is hard. This session helps you transition from an object-oriented imperative programmer to a functional programmer, using Java, Clojure and Scala for examples. Read more.
Business
Location: D137/138
Rikki Endsley (USENIX Association)
Average rating: ****.
(4.25, 12 ratings)
Many tech companies and hiring managers would like to hire from a more diverse pool of qualified applicants, but they keep getting the same kinds of candidates. This talk provides specific tips for tweaking recruiting practices to attract a diverse pool of candidates, and offers tips for creating a culture that helps retain a diverse team of tech talent. Read more.
PHP
Location: D139/140
Edward Finkler (FictiveKin)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 7 ratings)
Some people will tell you that you need a large, full-stack framework to do web development The Right Way. These people are wrong. In this talk, we'll focus on four core principles to be a better developer and make your projects more manageable: - Learn languages, not frameworks - Build small things - Less code is better than more - Create and use simple, readable code Read more.
Software Architecture
Location: D137/138
Neal Ford (ThoughtWorks)
Average rating: ****.
(4.53, 15 ratings)
This session talks about the tension between architecture & design in agile projects, discussing two key elements of emergent design (utilizing the last responsible moment and harvesting idiomatic patterns) and how to de-brittlize your architecture, so that you can play nicely with others Read more.
Python
Location: D136
Alex Martelli (Google)
Average rating: ****.
(4.75, 24 ratings)
Our culture's default assumption is that everybody should always be striving for perfection -- settling for anything less is seen as a regrettable compromise. This is wrong in most software development situations: focus instead on keeping the software simple, just "good enough", launch it early, and iteratively improve, enhance, and re-factor it. This is how software success is achieved! Read more.
Python
Location: D136
Bruce Eckel (Mindview, LLC)
Average rating: ***..
(3.43, 14 ratings)
C++ brought exceptions to mainstream programming; Java goes further with checked exceptions. But are exceptions the one way to report all errors? Scala and Go suggest there is more than one kind of error, so there should be more than one kind of error reporting, and different responses to errors. I’ll show the Scala and Go approaches to the error problem, and how to apply this to Python. Read more.
Cloud
Location: F150
Eric Redmond (Basho)
Average rating: ****.
(4.43, 14 ratings)
Scalability today is no longer a question of architecture, or programming language, but instead two things: message passing and data distribution. With the following patterns under your belt, anyone is well on their way to solving both. * Message patterns: request-reply, publish-subscribe, push-pull, exclusive pair. * Data structures: DHTs, Vector clocks, Merkel trees, CRDTs. Read more.
Operations
Location: Portland 255
Solomon Hykes (dotCloud)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 12 ratings)
Compared to KVM or Xen, LXC has very low overhead since it runs processes within a common host kernel, instead of emulating complete machines. LXC relies on kernel namespaces (providing isolation), and control groups (ensuring fair sharing of resources). We will detail their respective roles. We will also show how to use unioning filesystems for fast & lightweight provisioning of environments. Read more.
Community
Location: E144
Laura Thomson (Mozilla Corporation)
Average rating: ****.
(4.39, 18 ratings)
As your team grows and your projects become more complex, you're going to need a certain amount of process. In this talk I'll explain how to add enough engineering management to be effective without driving engineers crazy. Read more.
Software Architecture
Location: Portland Ballroom
Tim Bray (Google, Inc.)
Average rating: ****.
(4.35, 17 ratings)
There are three flavors of identity pain: Users struggling with passwords (which don’t scale to the Net), operators living in fear of being hacked and leaking personal data, and developers fighting with arcane identity APIs. This talk surveys the state of play the in the effort to reduce all three. Read more.
Perl
Location: E145
Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
Average rating: ****.
(4.62, 13 ratings)
The Perl Renaissance is in full swing. Object frameworks and syntax have been undated, web frameworks are easy and powerful, and modules are easy to manage and install. White Camel Award winner Paul Fenwick will be covering the best technologies of the recent age. No prior Perl experience required! Read more.
Perl
Location: E145
Ricardo Signes (Pobox.com)
Average rating: ****.
(4.78, 9 ratings)
What's new in Perl 5? This talk, given by the Perl 5 project manager (aka, "the pumpking") summarizes developments in the latest stable release of Perl 5, changes being worked on for next year, and an overview of life amidst the members of the perl5 development community. Read more.
Tools and Techniques
Location: E146
Mark Allen (Mark Allen)
Average rating: ****.
(4.55, 11 ratings)
DTrace is a facility for dynamically tracing operating system level code paths in real time in production (if you so desire.) But what you may not know is that many programming languages support DTrace as well, including Perl, Python and Erlang. This talk will show you how DTrace helps you find and solve tricky application problems quickly and safely even in production environments. Read more.
Data
Location: Portland 256
Dimitri Fontaine (2ndQuadrant)
Average rating: **...
(2.40, 5 ratings)
Once a Top-10 internet audience site. 32 million users. Billions of photos and comments, more than 6TB of them. Migrating away from MySQL to PostgreSQL! Read more.
Business, Community
Location: D137/138
Deb Nicholson (Open Invention Network)
Average rating: ****.
(4.62, 13 ratings)
Many projects would like to have more people doing more stuff, but delegating seems time-consuming. Meanwhile, new contributor enthusiasm is one of the most valuable commodities in the free software world. Great delegators know how to attract enthusiastic new people and maintain their momentum once they've arrived. Read more.
Geek Lifestyle
Location: Portland Ballroom
Dave Neary (Red Hat)
Average rating: ****.
(4.22, 9 ratings)
How do you grow the next generation of hackers? As our community gets older, we are making little humans, and we have an excellent opportunity as parents to indoctrinate them with seditious ideas like "it's better to share", and "if you don't like the way things are, change them". Here's one parent's story of toys and activities for kids from 3 to 10 to grow a new hacker generation. Read more.

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