OSCON 2013 Schedule

Below are the confirmed and scheduled talks at OSCON 2013
(schedule subject to change).

Customize Your Own Schedule

Create your own OSCON schedule using the personal scheduler function. Mark the tutorials, sessions, keynotes, and events you want to attend by selecting the calendar icon [calendar icon] next to each listing. Then go to your personal schedule and get your own customized schedule generated.

Portland Ballroom
Add Create More Value Than You Capture to your personal schedule
10:40am Create More Value Than You Capture Tim O'Reilly (O'Reilly Media, Inc.)
Add Reducing Identity Pain to your personal schedule
1:40pm Reducing Identity Pain Tim Bray (Google, Inc.)
Add Reinventing Business to your personal schedule
2:30pm Reinventing Business Bruce Eckel (Mindview, LLC)
Add Literacy: The Shift From Reading to Writing to your personal schedule
4:10pm Literacy: The Shift From Reading to Writing Robert "r0ml" Lefkowitz (Sharewave)
Add Hardware Hacking With Your Kids to your personal schedule
5:00pm Hardware Hacking With Your Kids Dave Neary (Red Hat)
Portland 252
Add Getting Started with 3D Programming in Three.js to your personal schedule
10:40am Getting Started with 3D Programming in Three.js Chris Strom (EEE Computes), Robin Strom (EEE Computes)
Add Functional Composition to your personal schedule
1:40pm Functional Composition Piers Cawley (Thermeon)
Add Adventures in Node.js to your personal schedule
2:30pm Adventures in Node.js Faisal Abid (Dynamatik, Inc.)
Add New Rules For JavaScript to your personal schedule
4:10pm New Rules For JavaScript Kyle Simpson (Getify Solutions)
Add Offline strategies for HTML5 web applications to your personal schedule
5:00pm Offline strategies for HTML5 web applications Stephan Hochdörfer (bitExpert AG)
Portland 251
Add Android Developer Tools Essentials to your personal schedule
10:40am Android Developer Tools Essentials Mike Wolfson (Epocrates)
Add Bust the Android Fragmentation Myth to your personal schedule
11:30am Bust the Android Fragmentation Myth Chiu-Ki Chan (Square Island LLC)
Add Android Platform Security Underpinnings to your personal schedule
1:40pm Android Platform Security Underpinnings Marko Gargenta (Twitter)
Add Using Android outside of the Mobile Phone Space to your personal schedule
2:30pm Using Android outside of the Mobile Phone Space Jason Kridner (Texas Instruments)
Add From Maker to China to your personal schedule
4:10pm From Maker to China Brady Forrest (Highway1)
Portland 255
Add Making Functional Programming Approachable to your personal schedule
10:40am Making Functional Programming Approachable Simon St. Laurent (O'Reilly Media, Inc.)
Add Docker And The Future of Linux Containers to your personal schedule
11:30am Docker And The Future of Linux Containers Solomon Hykes (dotCloud)
Add Rust: a modern systems language to your personal schedule
1:40pm Rust: a modern systems language Dave Herman (Mozilla)
Add Open Source Automotive Development to your personal schedule
2:30pm Open Source Automotive Development Jeff Payne (OpenCar, Inc.), Sam Skjonsberg (OpenCar, Inc.)
Add Introduction to Quirrel & R for Dummies to your personal schedule
4:10pm Introduction to Quirrel & R for Dummies John A. De Goes (Precog)
D135
Add Arduino Hacking 101: Importing the Universe to your personal schedule
10:40am Arduino Hacking 101: Importing the Universe Federico Lucifredi (Canonical | Ubuntu)
Add ArduSat: Open Source In Orbit to your personal schedule
11:30am ArduSat: Open Source In Orbit Jonathan Oxer (Freetronics)
Add Open Sourcing Hardware with GitHub to your personal schedule
1:40pm Open Sourcing Hardware with GitHub Christopher Clark (SparkFun Electronics Inc.)
Add Open Source Hardware with Creative, Free Software Multimedia Development to your personal schedule
2:30pm Open Source Hardware with Creative, Free Software Multimedia Development Dana Moser (Massachusetts College of Art and Design)
Add Project Cheesy Fingers:  OpenCompute Hardware Hacking to your personal schedule
4:10pm Project Cheesy Fingers: OpenCompute Hardware Hacking Andrew Cencini (Bennington College), Steven White (Nebula)
D136
Add "Good enough" is good enough! to your personal schedule
10:40am "Good enough" is good enough! Alex Martelli (Google)
Add Rethinking Errors: Learning from Scala and Go to your personal schedule
11:30am Rethinking Errors: Learning from Scala and Go Bruce Eckel (Mindview, LLC)
Add Harvest: Data Discovery for Humans to your personal schedule
1:40pm Harvest: Data Discovery for Humans Byron Ruth (The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia), Michael Italia (The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia)
Add Python 103: Memory Model & Best Practices to your personal schedule
4:10pm Python 103: Memory Model & Best Practices wesley chun (Google)
Add The vanishing pattern: from iterators to generators in Python to your personal schedule
5:00pm The vanishing pattern: from iterators to generators in Python Luciano Ramalho (Python.pro.br)
Portland 256
Add Database Performance: What Really Matters ?  to your personal schedule
10:40am Database Performance: What Really Matters ? Peter Zaitsev (Percona Inc)
Add InnoDB Features in MySQL 5.6 and Beyond to your personal schedule
11:30am InnoDB Features in MySQL 5.6 and Beyond Calvin Sun (Twitter)
Add Building a Distributed SQL Database ... from Scratch to your personal schedule
1:40pm Building a Distributed SQL Database ... from Scratch Bradford Stephens (Drawn to Scale)
Add Design Patterns for Large-Scale Database Management to your personal schedule
2:30pm Design Patterns for Large-Scale Database Management Robert Hodges (Continuent.com)
Add Large Scale MySQL Migration to PostgreSQL to your personal schedule
4:10pm Large Scale MySQL Migration to PostgreSQL Dimitri Fontaine (2ndQuadrant)
Add MySQL Administration for Developers to your personal schedule
5:00pm MySQL Administration for Developers Ligaya Turmelle (MySQL)
D137/138
Add Evolutionary Architecture and Emergent Design to your personal schedule
10:40am Evolutionary Architecture and Emergent Design Neal Ford (ThoughtWorks)
Add CANCELLED: Open Government as Open Source to your personal schedule
11:30am CANCELLED: Open Government as Open Source Jeanne Holm (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA)
Add A Tech-Liberty Scorecard to your personal schedule
1:40pm A Tech-Liberty Scorecard Dan Gillmor (The Guardian/Arizona State University's Cronkite School of Journalism & Mass Communication)
Add Can Evil Corporations Embrace Open Source? to your personal schedule
2:30pm Can Evil Corporations Embrace Open Source? Simon Phipps (Open Source Initiative)
Add Choose Your Own Adventure - Growing Your Own Career in Open Source to your personal schedule
4:10pm Choose Your Own Adventure - Growing Your Own Career in Open Source Amye Scavarda (Phase2 Technology), Leslie Hawthorn (Elasticsearch)
Add How to Delegate, Like a Boss to your personal schedule
5:00pm How to Delegate, Like a Boss Deb Nicholson (Open Invention Network)
E144
Add Quantitative community management to your personal schedule
10:40am Quantitative community management Asheesh Laroia (Eventbrite)
Add Minimum Viable Bureaucracy to your personal schedule
11:30am Minimum Viable Bureaucracy Laura Thomson (Mozilla Corporation)
Add Rebooting the Team:  Lessons Learned in an Introspective Year to your personal schedule
1:40pm Rebooting the Team: Lessons Learned in an Introspective Year Fran Fabrizio (Minnesota Population Center, U of Minnesota), Peter Clark (Minnesota Population Center, U of Mn)
Add Creating a User Journey for Your Open Source Community to your personal schedule
2:30pm Creating a User Journey for Your Open Source Community Francesca Krihely (MongoDB)
Add How We Built Our Community in GitHub to your personal schedule
4:10pm How We Built Our Community in GitHub Uri Cohen (GigaSpaces Technologies)
Add WebPlatform.org: A Case Study in Open Technical Documentation to your personal schedule
5:00pm WebPlatform.org: A Case Study in Open Technical Documentation Doug Schepers (W3C), Janet Swisher (Mozilla), Eliot Graff (Microsoft)
D139/140
Add The End Of Object Inheritance & The Beginning Of Anti-Rumsfeldian Modularity to your personal schedule
10:40am The End Of Object Inheritance & The Beginning Of Anti-Rumsfeldian Modularity Augie Fackler (Google), Nathaniel Manista (Google)
Add Finite State Machines - Why the fear? to your personal schedule
11:30am Finite State Machines - Why the fear? Mahesh Paolini-Subramanya (Ubiquiti Networks, Inc.)
Add Beginning Drupal for Non-Developers to your personal schedule
2:30pm Beginning Drupal for Non-Developers Cassandra Wolff (Softlayer an IBM Company)
Add OTP, the Middleware for Concurrent Distributed Scalable Architectures to your personal schedule
4:10pm OTP, the Middleware for Concurrent Distributed Scalable Architectures Francesco Cesarini (Erlang Solutions Ltd)
E145
Add To Infinity and Beyond - Storing your Moose herd in Elasticsearch to your personal schedule
10:40am To Infinity and Beyond - Storing your Moose herd in Elasticsearch Clinton Gormley (Elasticsearch BV)
Add Implementing Trampoline Objects in Perl to your personal schedule
11:30am Implementing Trampoline Objects in Perl Steven Lembark (Workhorse Computing)
Add The Perl Renaissance to your personal schedule
1:40pm The Perl Renaissance Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
Add Perl 5: Postcards from the Edge to your personal schedule
2:30pm Perl 5: Postcards from the Edge Ricardo Signes (Pobox.com)
Add Situation Normal Everything Must Change to your personal schedule
4:10pm Situation Normal Everything Must Change Simon Wardley (Leading Edge Forum (CSC))
E146
Add PUP201: How to use Puppet like an adult to your personal schedule
10:40am PUP201: How to use Puppet like an adult Benjamin Kero (Mozilla Corporation), Daniel Maher (Mozilla)
Add LogStash: Yes, Logging Can Be Awesome to your personal schedule
11:30am LogStash: Yes, Logging Can Be Awesome James Turnbull (Docker)
Add Tuning TCP for the Web to your personal schedule
4:10pm Tuning TCP for the Web Jason Cook (Fastly)
E147
Add Fundamentals of Tuning OpenJDK's GC to your personal schedule
10:40am Fundamentals of Tuning OpenJDK's GC Charlie Hunt (Salesforce.com)
Add Divide & Conquer : Efficient Java for multi-core world to your personal schedule
11:30am Divide & Conquer : Efficient Java for multi-core world Velmurugan Periasamy (Verisign), Sunil Mundluri (Verisign)
Add Resiliency Through Failure to your personal schedule
2:30pm Resiliency Through Failure Ariel Tseitlin (Scale Venture Partner)
Add TripleO: OpenStack on OpenStack to your personal schedule
4:10pm TripleO: OpenStack on OpenStack Monty Taylor (HP)
Add Introducing Apache CloudStack to your personal schedule
5:00pm Introducing Apache CloudStack Kevin Kluge (Elasticsearch)
F150
Add AppScale -- Google App Engine in Open Source to your personal schedule
10:40am AppScale -- Google App Engine in Open Source Chandra Krintz (UCSB and AppScale Systems)
Add Distributed Patterns in Action to your personal schedule
11:30am Distributed Patterns in Action Eric Redmond (Basho)
Add Netflix API: Supporting Billions in the Cloud to your personal schedule
1:40pm Netflix API: Supporting Billions in the Cloud Daniel Jacobson (Netflix)
Add Running Your Open Source Project on Any Cloud Directly from GitHub to your personal schedule
2:30pm Running Your Open Source Project on Any Cloud Directly from GitHub Uri Cohen (GigaSpaces Technologies), Nati Shalom (Gigaspaces)
Add Building Scalable PHP Applications Using Google’s App Engine to your personal schedule
4:10pm Building Scalable PHP Applications Using Google’s App Engine Stuart Langley (Google), Amy Unruh (Google)
Add Breaking through with Cloud Foundry to your personal schedule
5:00pm Breaking through with Cloud Foundry Andy Piper (Twitter)
F151
Add Hacking Your Health to your personal schedule
10:40am Hacking Your Health David Uhlman (clearhealth inc.)
Add Quantifying your Fitness to your personal schedule
11:30am Quantifying your Fitness Kirsten Hunter (Akamai)
Add Kicking Impostor Syndrome In the Head to your personal schedule
1:40pm Kicking Impostor Syndrome In the Head Denise Paolucci (Dreamwidth Studios)
Add Everything Counts to your personal schedule
2:30pm Everything Counts Mari Huertas (Obama for America)
Add The Open Privacy Stack: Privly to your personal schedule
4:10pm The Open Privacy Stack: Privly Sean McGregor (The Privly Foundation), Jennifer Davidson (ChickTech)
Add Using the Realtime Web for Awesome Presentations to your personal schedule
5:00pm Using the Realtime Web for Awesome Presentations Wesley Hales (Shape Security)
E141
Add Code Review for Systems Administrators to your personal schedule
11:30am Code Review for Systems Administrators Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph (HP)
Add Class's Class is Class: Metaprogramming Ruby to your personal schedule
1:40pm Class's Class is Class: Metaprogramming Ruby Chris Kelly (New Relic)
Add Rust for the Jungle to your personal schedule
4:10pm Rust for the Jungle Sanghyeon Seo (Samsung Electronics)
E142
Add Calling All Geniuses: Developing Apps for Cars to your personal schedule
11:30am Calling All Geniuses: Developing Apps for Cars Nick Pudar (General Motors)
Add From Proprietary to Community: The Open Sourcing of Enyo to your personal schedule
1:40pm From Proprietary to Community: The Open Sourcing of Enyo Ben Combee (LG Electronics, webOS Framework Team)
Add Easy Scaling with Open Source Data Structures to your personal schedule
2:30pm Easy Scaling with Open Source Data Structures Talip Ozturk (Hazelcast)
Add Build Your Own PaaS to your personal schedule
4:10pm Build Your Own PaaS Steven Pousty (Red Hat OpenShift), Grant Shipley (Red Hat)
E143
Add inBloom Open Source Roadmap to your personal schedule
10:40am inBloom Open Source Roadmap Jason Hoekstra (inBloom)
Add Luigi - Batch Data Processing at Large Scale to your personal schedule
11:30am Luigi - Batch Data Processing at Large Scale Erik Bernhardsson (Spotify)
Add Building and Selling a Company Using Open Source to your personal schedule
2:30pm Building and Selling a Company Using Open Source Lucas Carlson (AppFog)
Add Thursday Welcome to your personal schedule
9:00am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Thursday Welcome Edd Dumbill (Silicon Valley Data Science), Sarah Novotny (NGINX), Matthew McCullough (GitHub, Inc.), Simon St. Laurent (O'Reilly Media, Inc.)
Add Diversity in the Innovation Economy: Why It Matters And What You Can Do About It to your personal schedule
9:05am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Diversity in the Innovation Economy: Why It Matters And What You Can Do About It Laura Weidman Powers (CODE2040)
Add Code Is Making Government More Effective to your personal schedule
9:20am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Code Is Making Government More Effective Jared Smith (Bluehost), Michal Migurski (Code For America), Tim O'Reilly (O'Reilly Media, Inc.)
Add Tom Preston-Werner to your personal schedule
9:30am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Tom Preston-Werner Tom Preston-Werner (GitHub)
Add Licensing Models and Building an Open Source Community to your personal schedule
9:45am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Licensing Models and Building an Open Source Community Eileen Evans (HP)
Add We The People: Open Source, Open Data to your personal schedule
9:55am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
We The People: Open Source, Open Data Leigh Heyman (Executive Office of the President)
10:10am Morning Break
Room: Exhibit Hall D
3:10pm Afternoon Break
Room: Exhibit Hall D
12:10pm Lunch - Sponsored by Google
Room: Exhibit Hall E
Add Morning Yoga to your personal schedule
7:30am Yoga
Room: Bottom of the stairs by the E Rooms
Morning Yoga
8:15am Plenary
Room: Bottom of the stairs by the E Rooms
TBC
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Business
Create More Value Than You Capture
Tim O'Reilly (O'Reilly Media, Inc.)
At O'Reilly, we've always tried to live by the slogan "Create more value than you capture." It's a great way to build a sustainable business and a sustainable economy.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Operations
Scaling systems configuration at Facebook: the paradigms, design, and software behind managing massive numbers of systems with open source and small teams
Phil Dibowitz (Facebook)
This talk looks at how Facebook has redesigned its configuration management system to handle a massive, dynamic, heterogeneous environment with a tiny team and open source software. We will look at the philosophy we use to manage our systems, the implementation of that philosophy, and how you can apply these ideas to any size server footprint, from a handful of servers to a global environment.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Software Architecture
Reducing Identity Pain
Tim Bray (Google, Inc.)
There are three flavors of identity pain: Users struggling with passwords (which don’t scale to the Net), operators living in fear of being hacked and leaking personal data, and developers fighting with arcane identity APIs. This talk surveys the state of play the in the effort to reduce all three.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Business
Reinventing Business
Bruce Eckel (Mindview, LLC)
Imagine an organization designed to create happiness among its workers. I’ll talk about my research for the past several years, companies I’ve visited, struggles against my own preconceptions, the surprising number of others who are pushing on the same ideas and writing books on the subject, things I’ve found that seem like answers, and questions that continue to accumulate.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Education
Literacy: The Shift From Reading to Writing
Robert "r0ml" Lefkowitz (Sharewave)
The open source movement is part of a larger historic shift in the relative societal value placed on writing over reading. This talk places the open source movement in the context of the evolution of literacy over the last five thousand years.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
Hardware Hacking With Your Kids
Dave Neary (Red Hat)
How do you grow the next generation of hackers? As our community gets older, we are making little humans, and we have an excellent opportunity as parents to indoctrinate them with seditious ideas like "it's better to share", and "if you don't like the way things are, change them". Here's one parent's story of toys and activities for kids from 3 to 10 to grow a new hacker generation.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) JavaScript & HTML5
Getting Started with 3D Programming in Three.js
Chris Strom (EEE Computes) et al
Want to learn 3D game programming? Want to learn how to make cool animations with Three.js? Want to make amazing visualizations in 3D? Well, then this is the session for you! This tutorial will introduce you to: 3D concepts in Three.js, coding for canvas and WebGL, animation techniques, and real world simulation with physics engines. You'll be amazed at what you can create!
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) JavaScript & HTML5
Deal with multiple types of input in your HTML5/JavaScript code
Olivier Bloch (Microsoft)
An introduction to the emerging standard Pointer Events that will undoubtedly help developers write code that will support multiple input types (mouse, touch, pen,...)
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) JavaScript & HTML5
Functional Composition
Piers Cawley (Thermeon)
Making music with CoffeeScript, Node.js and higher order programming. What could possibly go wrong?
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) JavaScript & HTML5
Adventures in Node.js
Faisal Abid (Dynamatik, Inc.)
Almost everyone has heard about Node.js, but lots of people dismiss it as being just "Javascript". In this talk, you'll learn about what Node.js is, why its important you understand it and learn why it's the most powerful web technology in recent years.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) JavaScript
New Rules For JavaScript
Kyle Simpson (Getify Solutions)
This talk is going to re-visit some of the "tough parts" of the language by declaring "New Rules" (Bill Maher style) for the language. For instance: "New rule: Stop using `this` until you fully understand how it gets assigned." This talk is going to be hard-core on coding and expects a solid understanding of the language.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) JavaScript & HTML5
Offline strategies for HTML5 web applications
Stephan Hochdörfer (bitExpert AG)
There has been a strong connection between the terms "web" and "online" for years. The rise of HTML5 and the support of offline mode in most modern browsers changed the play of the game. This session will introduce different ways of storing data on the client as well as highlighting the limitations.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Mobile
Android Developer Tools Essentials
Mike Wolfson (Epocrates)
Android development is challenging. Fortunately, the developer tools provide a great deal of support, making the job more manageable, and a lot easier. I will show you many essential tools, tips and techniques that will increase your development productivity, and improve the quality of your code.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Mobile
Bust the Android Fragmentation Myth
Chiu-Ki Chan (Square Island LLC)
Designers and developers have been afraid of the variety of Android flavors for way too long. Android borrows a lot of concept from the web, and we can use the same techniques to cater to the different OS versions and form factors.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Mobile
Android Platform Security Underpinnings
Marko Gargenta (Twitter)
Android Security is quite multifaceted - not surprisingly given the depth and complexity of the Android OS. In this talk, you will learn what makes up the various layers of security and how they work together. By the end of this talk, you’ll have a solid understanding of various security concerns from the low level kernel to the high level app permissions, and everything in between.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Mobile
Using Android outside of the Mobile Phone Space
Jason Kridner (Texas Instruments)
We will discuss the benefits & advantages of Android for embedded segments and how to take it outside of the mobile phone space.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Business
From Maker to China
Brady Forrest (Highway1)
You've come up with the next gadget, Kickstarter has found you customers and proven the demand. Now, you're a victim of your own success & you have to get 10,000 made. In this session, Brady Forrest will explain how companies tackle the challenges of actually making something—and the hard realities of scaling your initial prototype to thousands of finished products.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Mobile
Location, Location, Location: Mastering Android Geolocation
Andy Gup (Esri)
Join us for an in-depth look at native Android Location and GPS capabilities. You'll learn about the many different aspects of the android.location package and how to use it effectively, starting now. We'll apply real-world use cases and demo the results based on different application configurations. In less than one hour you'll learn what typically takes developers several weeks to figure out.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Programming
Making Functional Programming Approachable
Simon St. Laurent (O'Reilly Media, Inc.)
Distributed computing, resilience, and constant efforts to make code more maintainable are all driving interest in functional programming. The world needs more programmers who can tackle this. How can we make the craft seem less arcane?
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Operations
Docker And The Future of Linux Containers
Solomon Hykes (dotCloud)
Compared to KVM or Xen, LXC has very low overhead since it runs processes within a common host kernel, instead of emulating complete machines. LXC relies on kernel namespaces (providing isolation), and control groups (ensuring fair sharing of resources). We will detail their respective roles. We will also show how to use unioning filesystems for fast & lightweight provisioning of environments.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Programming
Rust: a modern systems language
Dave Herman (Mozilla)
Anyone who has written a program in C++ knows that simple errors can cause crashes and security vulnerabilities in even innocent looking code. Rust is a new programming language that provides important safety guarantees without sacrificing precise control over the machine. In this talk, Dave Herman demonstrates how Rust can be used to produce high-level, clean code that is also safe and efficient.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Open Hardware, Programming
Open Source Automotive Development
Jeff Payne (OpenCar, Inc.) et al
We'll cover OS development for a new market: automotive apps. In-car apps are poised to explode for open source developers. The market is transforming from an inefficient, proprietary model to an HTML5-based “app store” model. To enter and participate in this new target category, developers need access to automakers, automotive systems, and knowledge of industry standards and platforms.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Programming
Introduction to Quirrel & R for Dummies
John A. De Goes (Precog)
In this talk, John De Goes will show how Developers and Data Scientists can use Quirrel (statistically-oriented language) to solve problems across large data sets. John will also walk through the core syntax and features of R, providing enough training to give anyone the ability to do simple analysis.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Data
Using Cascalog to build an app with City of Palo Alto Open Data
Paco Nathan (Databricks)
As new data sets become available through municipal Open Data initiatives, how can these be leveraged to reveal insights and build services for communities? This talk shows Cascalog and Open Data from the City of Palo Alto to create a sample app. Some programming background is helpful, but the emphasis is on process: how to approach large-scale Open Data to build data products for a community.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Open Hardware
Arduino Hacking 101: Importing the Universe
Federico Lucifredi (Canonical | Ubuntu)
This session aims to give you the tools to import the real world into the programming scope of your trusty $30 microcontroller, by covering the technology fundamentals and integration essentials of a wide variety of sensors, as well as providing a few alternative power schemes, some actuator examples and even mobility options to increase the variety of your design arsenal.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Open Hardware
ArduSat: Open Source In Orbit
Jonathan Oxer (Freetronics)
The ArduSat project will launch two Open Source cubesats into orbit in 2013, carrying a payload combining an extensive sensor suite and cameras with a multi-node processor platform based on Arduino. Hobbyists and students will be able to design experiments using regular Arduino hardware, ready to be uploaded and executed on the satellite. Learn about the satellite and how it works.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Open Hardware
Open Sourcing Hardware with GitHub
Christopher Clark (SparkFun Electronics Inc.)
Releasing the source is only half the battle. Collaborating with the community to improve it is what can set an open source project apart. This session details the challenges faced by SparkFun Electronics as it pumped an entire catalog of open hardware projects into GitHub and began collaborating with the community to fix bugs, add features, and advance the technology.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Open Hardware
Open Source Hardware with Creative, Free Software Multimedia Development
Dana Moser (Massachusetts College of Art and Design)
Digital Media educator Dana Moser will take you through a number of popular options for open source software-based interactions with the Arduino microcontroller and the Raspberry Pi. Includes Processing and PureData (Pd) programming environments for multimedia development.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Open Hardware
Project Cheesy Fingers: OpenCompute Hardware Hacking
Andrew Cencini (Bennington College) et al
The OpenCompute Hardware Hackathon was designed to bring together electrical, mechanical and software engineers in order to design a novel, low-cost hardware contribution to the OpenComptue project. In this talk, we discuss our team's winning submission, as well as the ideas, people, tools and process that went into the hack.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Open Hardware
Who’s there? - Home Automation with Arduino/RaspberryPi
Rupa Dachere (CodeChix)
Have you ever found yourself obsessively checking UPS or FedEx tracking site to see if your package finally got delivered at your doorstep? Or wondered when your contractor/gardener showed up to do their job? Come join me to learn how to build your own gadget to notify you when your package or contractor shows up at your doorstep!
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Python
"Good enough" is good enough!
Alex Martelli (Google)
Our culture's default assumption is that everybody should always be striving for perfection -- settling for anything less is seen as a regrettable compromise. This is wrong in most software development situations: focus instead on keeping the software simple, just "good enough", launch it early, and iteratively improve, enhance, and re-factor it. This is how software success is achieved!
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Python
Rethinking Errors: Learning from Scala and Go
Bruce Eckel (Mindview, LLC)
C++ brought exceptions to mainstream programming; Java goes further with checked exceptions. But are exceptions the one way to report all errors? Scala and Go suggest there is more than one kind of error, so there should be more than one kind of error reporting, and different responses to errors. I’ll show the Scala and Go approaches to the error problem, and how to apply this to Python.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Data, Python
Harvest: Data Discovery for Humans
Byron Ruth (The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) et al
The biomedical research community is amidst a data revolution driven by the adoption of electronic health records and the arrival of next generation genomic technologies. Researchers require tools that scale with this increase without added complexity. To address this need we have developed Harvest, an open source framework for rapid development of purpose-built data discovery web applications.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) User Experience (UX)
Designing The Internet of Things with the 3 Laws of Robotics
Joshua Marinacci (Nokia)
We are rapidly approaching the age of living spaces filled with smart thermostats, doors, lights, toilets and more. How do we design interfaces for them? How can people manage 200 gadgets each demanding new batteries? What if your networked toaster rats you out to the FBI? We will explore using the classic Three Laws of Robotics to guide interface design of the Internet of Things.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Python
Python 103: Memory Model & Best Practices
wesley chun (Google)
There's a growing crowd of Python users who don't consider themselves beginners anymore. However some may notice behavior that's hard to explain. Why doesn't code behave like it should? Why doesn't "correct" code run correctly? We'll look at Python's memory model & best practices, addressing these issues directly. Let's empower attendees to write good code & not create these bugs to begin with!
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Python
The vanishing pattern: from iterators to generators in Python
Luciano Ramalho (Python.pro.br)
From the elegant for statement through list/set/dict comprehensions and generator functions, this talk shows how the Iterator pattern is so deeply embedded in the syntax of Python, and so widely supported by its libraries, that some of its most powerful applications can be overlooked by programmers coming from other languages.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Data
Database Performance: What Really Matters ?
Peter Zaitsev (Percona Inc)
In many Performance evaluation studies, you will find comparison made in terms of peak throughput or corresponding response time. This can be misleading. In this brief presentation, we will look into why such metrics can be misleading as well as provide framework and principles about performance evaluation which focuses on being able to provide good service in real world production environments.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Data
InnoDB Features in MySQL 5.6 and Beyond
Calvin Sun (Twitter)
MySQL 5.6 is simply a better MySQL with improvements that enhance every functional area of the database kernel. There are many new features in the InnoDB storage engine, including: better performance and scalability, online DDL, persistent statistics, NoSQL access, and many more.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Data
Building a Distributed SQL Database ... from Scratch
Bradford Stephens (Drawn to Scale)
Spire is one of the first open source distributed SQL databases. Architected from the ground up with no legacy code, it's meant to power large-scale applications with 10's of thousands of reads and writes at the petabyte-scale. This talk will cover parts of Spire like distributed computational fabric, distributed indexing, query planning, and more.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Data
Design Patterns for Large-Scale Database Management
Robert Hodges (Continuent.com)
Successful database applications do not happen by accident. In this talk we will present a half-dozen design patterns for database management to help implement 24x7 applications that handle 100s of terabytes spread over multiple continents on databases like MYSQL. Start out using these patterns now and avoid a lot of pain later.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Data
Large Scale MySQL Migration to PostgreSQL
Dimitri Fontaine (2ndQuadrant)
Once a Top-10 internet audience site. 32 million users. Billions of photos and comments, more than 6TB of them. Migrating away from MySQL to PostgreSQL!
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Data
MySQL Administration for Developers
Ligaya Turmelle (MySQL)
Many companies need their employees to do more then one job - Programmer, DBA, SysAdmin. The more skills you have, the more you can contribute to the overall success of the company and improve your own job marketability. Learn the basic commands of MySQL Server Administration that every Developer should know, what each does and how to use them.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Software Architecture
Evolutionary Architecture and Emergent Design
Neal Ford (ThoughtWorks)
This session talks about the tension between architecture & design in agile projects, discussing two key elements of emergent design (utilizing the last responsible moment and harvesting idiomatic patterns) and how to de-brittlize your architecture, so that you can play nicely with others
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Business
CANCELLED: Open Government as Open Source
Jeanne Holm (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA)
The governments of the US and India have released the Open Government Platform, an open source capability for any government to use to create an open data portal. Such projects encourage transparency, innovation, and economic growth in nations. The OGPL community encompasses hundreds of individuals from across the world to help further these shared goals.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
A Tech-Liberty Scorecard
Dan Gillmor (The Guardian/Arizona State University's Cronkite School of Journalism & Mass Communication)
Big companies and governments are recentralizing our computing and communications, giving us convenience but taking away edge-of-network liberties we enjoyed in the Internet's early days. Meanwhile, surveillance and black-hat hacking are growing. Let's create a scorecard that tells us -- users, companies, governments -- what level of liberty we have, or allow.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Business
Can Evil Corporations Embrace Open Source?
Simon Phipps (Open Source Initiative)
Can a corporate predator become a community herbivore? Perhaps - corporations take a journey from control freak to community contributor. Hear about the journey and the key changes that can make it succeed.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Business
Choose Your Own Adventure - Growing Your Own Career in Open Source
Amye Scavarda (Phase2 Technology) et al
You're a fantastic developer/coder of all trades/project manager/designer/sysadmin - but you want to be able to do a little more. What's your strategy for being able to choose your next level up? We’ll review: strategic and tactical steps, choosing your adventure and acting on it from both a business perspective of a 'career track' as well as ways to be able to participate through open source.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Business, Community
How to Delegate, Like a Boss
Deb Nicholson (Open Invention Network)
Many projects would like to have more people doing more stuff, but delegating seems time-consuming. Meanwhile, new contributor enthusiasm is one of the most valuable commodities in the free software world. Great delegators know how to attract enthusiastic new people and maintain their momentum once they've arrived.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Community
Quantitative community management
Asheesh Laroia (Eventbrite)
In recent years, communities as wide-ranging as Wikihow to Thunderbird have been surveying participants and using this information to improve the experiences of participants. Learn how open source projects are tracking contributors to identify where people fall away, and to nudge them forward, with an eye toward actionable data and addressing possible sources of bias.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Community
Minimum Viable Bureaucracy
Laura Thomson (Mozilla Corporation)
As your team grows and your projects become more complex, you're going to need a certain amount of process. In this talk I'll explain how to add enough engineering management to be effective without driving engineers crazy.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Community
Rebooting the Team: Lessons Learned in an Introspective Year
Fran Fabrizio (Minnesota Population Center, U of Minnesota) et al
When our dev team hit a rut recently, we spent a year examining ourselves - our motivations and values, our processes and tools, our relationships to each other and our customers, even our physical space. We put what we learned to good use and reenergized the team. In this talk we'll share how we did it, some surprises along the way, and techniques that you can use to help reboot your own team.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Community
Creating a User Journey for Your Open Source Community
Francesca Krihely (MongoDB)
In this session, we will go through how to design a community path to increase user involvement over time. Much of this will go through how to initiate early user engagement through a value proposition and build on that momentum over time. By creating a strong value proposition, in turn you create opportunity and access for your users and build a stronger, more vibrant community.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Community
How We Built Our Community in GitHub
Uri Cohen (GigaSpaces Technologies)
GitHub isn’t just for Git anymore. With new projects, as well as open source and SaaS tools you can get back to basics and build websites the old school way. By foregoing the common CMS platform, you can increase agility and transparency, and put the control of your site back in your hands.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Community
WebPlatform.org: A Case Study in Open Technical Documentation
Doug Schepers (W3C) et al
WebPlatform.org is a community-based documentation site for web developers and designers, based on open principles, process, and software, convened by W3C with stewardship by web industry leaders. This session will explore the pragmatic decisions and challenges faced by creating an open documentation project around technology and standards.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Software Architecture
The End Of Object Inheritance & The Beginning Of Anti-Rumsfeldian Modularity
Augie Fackler (Google) et al
After fifteen years combined experience developing software of all types we are done with object inheritance and the compromises that it forces on us. Come learn about elegant, superior solutions to the problems inheritance claims to adequately solve.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Software Architecture
Finite State Machines - Why the fear?
Mahesh Paolini-Subramanya (Ubiquiti Networks, Inc.)
Finite State Machines are rarely used, and virtually always dismissed as "too complex" . This is a tragedy since FSMs aren't just about Door Locks, but are invaluable in defining _any_ communication protocols. This talk will provide a crash course in FSMs using erlang's "gen_fsm" behavior as a template, hopefully leaving you with a better appreciation of its uses.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) PHP
Interactive debugging in PHP: stealing the good bits from Ruby and JavaScript
Justin Hileman (Presentate)
It's sad that in 2013, var_dump and die are still two of the most common debugging and reflection techniques in PHP. Let's explore the state of interactive debugging in PHP, compare it with what's available in other languages, and apply this with practical tools and techniques which can be used today.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Business, PHP
Beginning Drupal for Non-Developers
Cassandra Wolff (Softlayer an IBM Company)
In this 40-minute session, I’d like to discuss the basic business needs in several use-case scenarios that would demonstrate the flexibility of an open-source platform called Drupal, which has made a breakthrough in the CMS community for its extreme flexibility and scalability in rapid development.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Software Architecture
OTP, the Middleware for Concurrent Distributed Scalable Architectures
Francesco Cesarini (Erlang Solutions Ltd)
A programming language is not enough to build massively scalable fault tolerant cloud based solutions. You need middleware, architectural patterns and tools fit for the purpose. Erlang is no exception. This talk introduces OTP, the defacto framework that comes as part of the Erlang distribution and for decades, has stopped programmers from reinventing the wheel.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Software Architecture
Lightweight Messaging For Web And Mobile With Apache ActiveMQ
Dejan Bosanac (RedHat)
New generation of mobile and web applications use asynchronous messaging extensively. This session will cover protocols and techniques available to use messaging infrastructure directly from web browsers and native mobile applications.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Perl
To Infinity and Beyond - Storing your Moose herd in Elasticsearch
Clinton Gormley (Elasticsearch BV)
Elastic::Model is a new framework to store your Moose objects, which uses ElasticSearch as a NoSQL document store and flexible search engine. It is designed to make small beginnings simple, but to scale easily to Big Data requirements without needing to rearchitect your application. No job too big or small!
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Perl
Implementing Trampoline Objects in Perl
Steven Lembark (Workhorse Computing)
Object Trampolines are a flyweight pattern: the object is inexpensive to construct and transforms itself on demand. Perl's OO structure makes these relatively easy to implement and use. This talk describes the Object::Trampoline module with applications using DBI and data objects.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Perl
The Perl Renaissance
Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
The Perl Renaissance is in full swing. Object frameworks and syntax have been undated, web frameworks are easy and powerful, and modules are easy to manage and install. White Camel Award winner Paul Fenwick will be covering the best technologies of the recent age. No prior Perl experience required!
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Perl
Perl 5: Postcards from the Edge
Ricardo Signes (Pobox.com)
What's new in Perl 5? This talk, given by the Perl 5 project manager (aka, "the pumpking") summarizes developments in the latest stable release of Perl 5, changes being worked on for next year, and an overview of life amidst the members of the perl5 development community.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Business
Situation Normal Everything Must Change
Simon Wardley (Leading Edge Forum (CSC))
.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Tools and Techniques
Mobilize Your MongoDB! Developing full stack Javascript applications.
Grant Shipley (Red Hat)
Grant Shipley, lead Evangelist for OpenShift, will demonstrate how to develop iPhone and Android apps with MongoDB and Node.js backends for the cloud. Let's skip having to learn three different languages and jumpstart the development process using what you already know. Nothing complicated, nothing convoluted. Just straight ahead mobile development goodness with MongoDB, Node.js, and javascript.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Operations
PUP201: How to use Puppet like an adult
Benjamin Kero (Mozilla Corporation) et al
Puppet is an immensely powerful tool, but it's not always obvious how to use Puppet correctly. I will explain guiding principles of responsible Puppet design and architecture, walk through real-life examples to illustrate solid approaches, and illuminate Puppeteers of all skill levels. As a bonus, I will demonstrate ho w to integrate into continuous integration platforms!
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Tools and Techniques
LogStash: Yes, Logging Can Be Awesome
James Turnbull (Docker)
Logging. Everyone does it. Many don't know why they do it. It is often considered a boring chore. A chore that is done by habit rather than for a purpose. But it doesn't have to be! Learn how to build a powerful, scalable open source logging environment with LogStash.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Operations
Go Language for Ops and Site Reliability Engineering
Gustavo Franco (Google)
How the Go programming language can help you to build reliable, scalable and easier to maintain systems.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Tools and Techniques
DTrace Your Application (Not Your Operating System)
Mark Allen (Mark Allen)
DTrace is a facility for dynamically tracing operating system level code paths in real time in production (if you so desire.) But what you may not know is that many programming languages support DTrace as well, including Perl, Python and Erlang. This talk will show you how DTrace helps you find and solve tricky application problems quickly and safely even in production environments.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Operations
Tuning TCP for the Web
Jason Cook (Fastly)
The performance of the network underlying our applications can have a dramatic effect on the experience of our users. This session will cover how to tune some of the interactions between TCP and your application to deliver solid performance over the public internet.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Tools and Techniques
Introducing Locksmith - an open source tool for detecting potential deadlocks in C and C++
Colin McCabe (Cloudera)
Debugging concurrency errors can be difficult. Fortunately, Locksmith can help. Locksmith is an open source tool for detecting potential deadlocks in C, C++, and Objective C programs. It can detect common concurrency mistakes.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Java & JVM
Fundamentals of Tuning OpenJDK's GC
Charlie Hunt (Salesforce.com)
There is a small set of fundamentals that, when well understood, can empower any one to tune any of the garbage collectors in OpenJDK's HotSpot JVM. This is what attendees of this session can expect to learn.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Java & JVM
Divide & Conquer : Efficient Java for multi-core world
Velmurugan Periasamy (Verisign) et al
The future hardware trend is clear.Moore’s Law will be delivering more cores per chip rather than higher clock rates. As multi-core, multiprocessor systems become cheaper and readily available, more of our applications need to exploit the hardware parallelism to realize exponential performance gains.This is all about how to write efficient java code in the multi core world
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Java & JVM
Getting Started with WebSocket and Server-Sent Events using Java
Reza Rahman (Oracle)
This session provides a primer on WebSocket and Server-Sent Events and their supported use cases. The attendees will learn how to leverage them in their web applications using several code samples through out the talk. Development, deployment, and debugging techniques will be shared with the attendees.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Java & JVM
Resiliency Through Failure
Ariel Tseitlin (Scale Venture Partner)
Failure is inevitable. It's only through frequent and ongoing failure that we can keep our web application resilient. Taking example from the Netflix Simian Army, we'll discuss how inducing failure in your production environment is one way to test fault-tolerance on a regular basis.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Cloud
TripleO: OpenStack on OpenStack
Monty Taylor (HP)
Turn your datacenter into a cloud, and then use that cloud to run a cloud. It's clouds all the way down!
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Cloud
Introducing Apache CloudStack
Kevin Kluge (Elasticsearch)
Apache CloudStack, a project in Incubation, helps an admin or devops engineer build an IaaS cloud. This talk provides a technical description of the CloudStack feature set, deployment options, and integration points with the data center. The project's status and possible future directions will be presented as well.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Cloud
AppScale -- Google App Engine in Open Source
Chandra Krintz (UCSB and AppScale Systems)
In this talk, we present AppScale, an open source implementation of Google App Engine -- think Google's cloud platform under your control. AppScale executes App Engine apps without modification, automatically manages and scales apps and their service ecosystems, and enables developers to plug in different service alternatives (e.g. NoSQL, SQL, analytics, search,..) without rewriting their code.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Cloud
Distributed Patterns in Action
Eric Redmond (Basho)
Scalability today is no longer a question of architecture, or programming language, but instead two things: message passing and data distribution. With the following patterns under your belt, anyone is well on their way to solving both. * Message patterns: request-reply, publish-subscribe, push-pull, exclusive pair. * Data structures: DHTs, Vector clocks, Merkel trees, CRDTs.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Cloud
Netflix API: Supporting Billions in the Cloud
Daniel Jacobson (Netflix)
Netflix has seen tremendous growth in recent years, supporting 800+ device types for more than 30M streaming customers. This growth presents amazing technical challenges. At the center of it all is the Netflix Internal API, quietly handling billions of requests a day. In this session, I will discuss the challenges & solutions, including cloud development, resiliency, scaling, UI support & more.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Cloud
Running Your Open Source Project on Any Cloud Directly from GitHub
Uri Cohen (GigaSpaces Technologies) et al
Just developed a new feature, and looking to try it out? The process of testing new features can be tedious and time consuming. This session will present a new open source solution that enables you to demo your features as a service with a javascript embed code.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) PHP
Building Scalable PHP Applications Using Google’s App Engine
Stuart Langley (Google) et al
Google App Engine allows you to build web applications on the same scalable systems that power Google applications. In this session we’ll dive into the best practices for writing scalable PHP applications on the App Engine platform.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Cloud
Breaking through with Cloud Foundry
Andy Piper (Twitter)
Public, private, and hybrid; software, platform, and infrastructure. This talk will discuss the current state of the Platform-as-a-Service space, and why the keys to success lie in enabling developer productivity, and providing openness and choice. We'll do this by considering the success of Open Source in general, and then look at the Cloud Foundry project and its growing ecosystem.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Geek Lifestyle
Hacking Your Health
David Uhlman (clearhealth inc.)
Most technology people have a unique perspective on problem solving and DIY. "Hacking Your Health" shows you how to put those same principles to use with your health and body. Get your labs done directly (for "science" or to save money), fun and profitable things to do with MRI/CAT like 3D Printing your head, "being the best patient you can be" and inner secrets about health care as a whole.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
Quantifying your Fitness
Kirsten Hunter (Akamai)
The Quantified Self movement is all about keeping measurements about your life in order to track progress in various ways. As geeks we all enjoy playing with new toys, and there are a variety of devices and applications out there to help measure steps, activity and fitness. Combining the data from these devices can help you build tools to track your fitness in a way that makes sense for you.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
Kicking Impostor Syndrome In the Head
Denise Paolucci (Dreamwidth Studios)
Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
Everything Counts
Mari Huertas (Obama for America)
"Everything counts, and people matter most of all." I wrote these words in my journal at the start of 2012, after I first joined the Obama campaign. Now, one year later, I'm realizing how prescient they were for our work – its development, shape, and shipment – and how acutely they apply to what we do in technology every day.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle, Tools and Techniques
The Open Privacy Stack: Privly
Sean McGregor (The Privly Foundation) et al
Come learn how to take back your internet privacy on services you hate to trust, but love to use! We created Privly, an open source privacy stack, to allow you to post private content to any website without trusting the host site. We will cover how Privly is a general solution to internet privacy, discuss the beta, and describe a new type of app infrastructure.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
Using the Realtime Web for Awesome Presentations
Wesley Hales (Shape Security)
How can you keep the audience engaged and motivated throughout an entire presentation? It’s simple: keep them on their smart phone. The days of asking the audience to raise their hand for an on-the-fly survey is over. An entire stream of engagement platforms for presentations are coming, and this talk will prepare you for the future.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Stage 2 Management Systems | Building A Foundation For Flexible Service Delivery
Kelcey Damage (Backbone Technology Inc.)
The presentation will discuss the building of a management system for the services and application layer of a cloud-application infrastructure. It will focus on the three key components in open source cloud-computing that don’t come in the box: o Self-healing application infrastructure o Dynamic auto-scaling o Automated guest administration
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Code Review for Systems Administrators
Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph (HP)
Using the public code review and automated testing infrastructure built for the OpenStack project itself, systems administrators for the core infrastructure also take advantage of this system to do systems administration for the project's core infrastructure in the open as well. Will discuss the infrastructure, tests we run against our changes and the challenges and successes we've encountered.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Class's Class is Class: Metaprogramming Ruby
Chris Kelly (New Relic)
Ruby's open class structure makes metaprogramming simple and powerful. At New Relic, we leverage metaprogramming in our Ruby agent to extract deep metrics about your code automatically. In this session, we'll start with the Ruby Object Model and work through the most common callbacks for efficient metaprogramming.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Its All About Me! Scaling Personalizable Content at Hulu
Dallas Mahrt (Hulu)
It's great knowing what is on TV, but what I really want is how that applies to me. This talk discusses how Hulu has built a scalable content metadata API that can incorporate user specific data.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Rust for the Jungle
Sanghyeon Seo (Samsung Electronics)
Rust is a system programming language with emphasis on safety, concurrency, and speed. Herb Sutter, in an article "Welcome to the Jungle", likened multi-core, heterogeneous many-core computing environment to the jungle. Have a trusty rusty knife for all your jungle needs.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Using And Extending The Freeside Billing Toolkit
Jason Hall (Bluehost)
When marketing, finance, and legislation collide, developers often get stuck with the short end of the stick. Instead of reinventing the wheel, there is an open source answer. Learn how developers can use the Freeside toolkit to create a flexible billing and payment controller.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Business
Calling All Geniuses: Developing Apps for Cars
Nick Pudar (General Motors)
Hear first-hand how automakers are re-thinking their structure and business models to move in-sync with the broader connected ecosystem and consumer trends. Explore how the GM SDK will expand access to the infotainment environment and engage the developer community through enabling multiple opportunities for app monetization.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
From Proprietary to Community: The Open Sourcing of Enyo
Ben Combee (LG Electronics, webOS Framework Team)
It was just two years ago that the first version of the Enyo library was introduced to the world as a proprietary JavaScript library, tied to the HP TouchPad and its SDK. Now, it’s a thriving framework running on everything from phones to tablets to desktops to TVs, with a contributor community spanning two major companies (LG and HP) and a vibrant collection of independent developers.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Easy Scaling with Open Source Data Structures
Talip Ozturk (Hazelcast)
In this session, we will discuss how you can easily scale your applications by using scalable data structures such as distributed map, queue and atomiclong implementations provided by Hazelcast, an open source in-memory data grid solution.
4:10pm-5:40pm (1h 30m) Cloud
Build Your Own PaaS
Steven Pousty (Red Hat OpenShift) et al
Learn all about OpenShift Origin – the FOSS platform as a service (PaaS). This session is intended for anyone who wants to learn more about the cool things we do under the hoods to make a true multi-tenant secure PaaS.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored Sessions
inBloom Open Source Roadmap
Jason Hoekstra (inBloom)
inBloom has built a suite of secure services to improve personalized learning for K-12 education. The source code for these services will be released under an Apache license later this year. Come participate in a discussion of our long-term plans of open-source community building and code governance.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Luigi - Batch Data Processing at Large Scale
Erik Bernhardsson (Spotify)
Luigi is a Python module that helps you build complex pipelines of batch jobs. It handles dependency resolution, workflow management, visualization etc. It also comes with Hadoop support built in.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Exploiting your File System to Build Robust & Efficient Workflows
Jason Johnson (SoftLayer)
If your software writes to disk, you can never know too much about your file system! File systems offer a feature set often replicated, usually with less performance and reliability. In this talk, we will cover the file system notification infrastructure (inotify), locking (mandatory vs advisory and implications of distribution), movement guarantees (atomicity), and basic performance tuning.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Building and Selling a Company Using Open Source
Lucas Carlson (AppFog)
Ever thought of starting your own company around Open Source tools? Lucas Carlson did just that with AppFog (a popular polyglot PaaS built with Cloud Foundry). Over 100,000 developers signed up for AppFog in 3 years. AppFog was acquired in June 2013 by CenturyLink.
9:00am-9:05am (5m) Keynotes
Thursday Welcome
Edd Dumbill (Silicon Valley Data Science) et al
Opening remarks by the OSCON program chairs, Sarah Novotny, Matthew McCullough and Edd Dumbill.
9:05am-9:20am (15m) Keynotes
Diversity in the Innovation Economy: Why It Matters And What You Can Do About It
Laura Weidman Powers (CODE2040)
The year 2040 is the year when people of color will be the majority in the United States, but minorities are vastly underrepresented in the most important part of the US economy, the tech sector. There's been a lot of discussion about the lack of diversity in Silicon Valley and the technology industry recently and, let's face it, the numbers are not good. But why does it even matter?
9:20am-9:30am (10m) Keynotes
Code Is Making Government More Effective
Jared Smith (Bluehost) et al
Open Source is quietly helping shape our society, and you can see its impact on government through the work of Code for America. From making public information more accessible to making public artwork easier to find, Code for America finds innovative ways to make a government more efficient.
9:30am-9:45am (15m) Keynotes
Tom Preston-Werner
Tom Preston-Werner (GitHub)
Tom Preston-Werner, Co-founder and CEO, GitHub.
9:45am-9:55am (10m) Keynotes
Licensing Models and Building an Open Source Community
Eileen Evans (HP)
Come hear some thoughts about how licensing models affect building an open source community and how their use has evolved over time.
9:55am-10:10am (15m) Keynotes
We The People: Open Source, Open Data
Leigh Heyman (Executive Office of the President)
Leigh will talk briefly about these achievements and more importantly what the future holds for Open Source and Open Data at The White House and the many ways citizens and developers can get involved.
10:10am-10:40am (30m)
Break: Morning Break
3:10pm-4:10pm (1h)
Break: Afternoon Break
12:10pm-1:40pm (1h 30m)
Break: Lunch - Sponsored by Google
<div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 6:00pm-7:30pm (1h 30m) Events </div> <div class="en_popup_name">Media Temple Party</div> <div class="en_popup_desc">Join Media Temple for free libations, food, and swag from 6:00pm - 7:30p at The Rose. Come say hi and pick up some swag! </div> </div> <div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 7:00pm-10:00pm (3h) Events </div> <div class="en_popup_name">Thursday Birds of a Feather Sessions (BoFs)</div> <div class="en_popup_desc">Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions provide face to face exposure to those interested in the same projects and concepts. BoFs can be organized for individual projects or broader topics (best practices, open data, standards). BoFs are entirely up to you. We post your topic and provide the space and time. You provide the engaging topic.</div> </div> <div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 7:30pm-9:00pm (1h 30m) Events </div> <div class="en_popup_name">Apache CouchDB Party hosted by Cloudant</div> <div class="en_popup_desc">Join us in celebrating the great year that the Apache CouchDB project had, welcoming new committers and pushing out many new releases. We&#x27;ll be in the courtyard at the Jupiter Hotel with food trucks and signature cocktails. Drinks and distributed database clustering for all!</div> </div> <div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 7:00pm-8:00pm (1h) Perl </div> <div class="en_popup_name">State Of The Onion</div> <div class="en_popup_speaker">R Geoffrey Avery (Platypi Ventures) et al</div> <div class="en_popup_desc">The annual What&#x27;s New in the Perl community.</div> </div>
7:30am-8:15am (45m) Events
Morning Yoga
Programmers do a lot of sitting, so come refresh your body, mind, and spirit before you head into the day’s sessions. This will be an easy beginner’s yoga session – so don’t be shy about coming out even if this will be your first yoga experience.
8:15am-9:00am (45m)
Plenary
To be confirmed

Sponsors

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the conference, contact Sharon Cordesse at (707) 827-7065 or scordesse@oreilly.com.

Contact Us

View a complete list of OSCON contacts