OSCON 2012 Schedule

Below are the confirmed and scheduled talks at OSCON 2012 (schedule subject to change).

Customize Your Own Schedule

Create your own OSCON schedule using the personal scheduler function. Mark the tutorials, sessions, keynotes, and events you want to attend by clicking on the calendar icon [calendar icon] next to each listing. Then click on "personal schedule" below and get your own customized schedule generated.

Portland 251
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10:40am Essential Node.js for Web Developers Mike Amundsen (Layer 7 Technologies)
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2:30pm Web Application Accessibility Alice Boxhall (Google)
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5:00pm Wikipedia's Next Billion Users with WebFonts Alolita Sharma (Wikimedia Foundation)
Portland 252
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10:40am Digging into Open Data Kim Rees (Periscopic)
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2:30pm Advanced MySQL Replication Architectures Luís Soares (Oracle)
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4:10pm PostgreSQL's place in the new world order Matthew Soldo (Heroku, Inc)
Portland 255
10:40am TBC
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11:30am The Art of Metaprogramming in Java Abdelmonaim Remani (The NorCal Java User Group)
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2:30pm Threads & JRuby, the Simple Alternative to Evented David Copeland (Stitch Fix)
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4:10pm Performance Tuning with Poor Tools and Cheap Drink Kirk Pepperdine (Independent)
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5:00pm Troubleshooting Slow or Hung Java Applications William Au (CBS Interactive)
Portland 256
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11:30am Efficient Web Applications with Erlang and Cowboy Loïc Hoguin (Nine Nines)
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1:40pm Behind The Mirror - the birth of Light Table. Chris Granger (Kodowa)
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2:30pm On The Economics of Technical Debt Abigail - (Booking.com)
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4:10pm Analyzing How Developers Learn Online For Fun and Profit Keith Fahlgren (Safari Books Online)
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5:00pm Generic Programming Galore using D Andrei Alexandrescu (Facebook)
D135
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10:40am Django doesn't scale! (And what you can do about it.) Jacob Kaplan-Moss (Revolution Systems, LLC)
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11:30am Large Django sites at Mozilla Andy McKay (Mozilla)
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1:40pm Python += Women: Increasing Engagement Lynn Root (PyLadies SF)
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2:30pm Connecting to Twitter & Google+ using Python wesley chun (Google)
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4:10pm Demystifying Python Metaclasses Eric Wills (University of Oregon/Vizme)
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5:00pm Inside Python Thomas Lee (New Relic)
D136
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10:40am What's New in Perl? Ricardo Signes (Pobox.com)
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11:30am Taming Perl Regexes Damian Conway (Thoughtstream)
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4:10pm Cooking Perl with Chef David Golden (Bunchmail)
D137
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10:40am Storytelling a Better User Experience Paul Tashima (Nebula Inc.)
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1:40pm The Yocto Project: Professional Tools for Embedded Linux Jeffrey Osier-Mixon (Intel Corporation)
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2:30pm Making Hardware Open: Challenges and Opportunities Frank Frankovsky (Facebook), Jonathan Bryce (The Rackspace Cloud), Brian Stevens (Red Hat), Steve Ichinaga (Hyve Solutions, a division of SYNNEX Corporation)
4:10pm TBC
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5:00pm Bonescript: Simplified Physical Computing with Node.JS Jason Kridner (Texas Instruments)
D138
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10:40am Girl Developers will Save the World! Cheryl Miller (greenlight for girls Foundation)
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11:30am Effecting Organizational Change Kane McLean (Open Source for America)
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1:40pm The Art of Organizational Manipulation Brian Fitzpatrick (Google, Inc.), Ben Collins-Sussman (Google, Inc.)
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2:30pm Open Source: The Next Generation Nóirín Plunkett (Eucalyptus Systems), Michael Schwern (eval Empire)
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4:10pm Ubuntu Home Hacks Allison Randal (DrugDev, Inc.)
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5:00pm Building a free Java community with deep roots Martijn Verburg (jClarity), Ben Evans (jClarity)
E144
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10:40am Why would you use PHP for a startup? Luke Welling ([Redacted])
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11:30am A Stitch In Time Saves Nine: Solving the N+1 Problem Paul Jones (http://paul-m-jones.com/)
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1:40pm Inside PHP Thomas Lee (New Relic)
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2:30pm Testing Untestable Code Stephan Hochdörfer (bitExpert AG)
4:10pm TBC
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5:00pm What every web developer should know about database optimization Steve Meyers (Utah Open Source Foundation)
E145
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11:30am US Government v. Open Source: A History and Lessons Learned Karl Fogel (Open Tech Strategies, LLC), Gunnar Hellekson (Red Hat)
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1:40pm Pivoting an African Open Source Project David Kobia (Ushahidi Inc)
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2:30pm Bootstrap Jacob Thornton (Twitter)
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4:10pm Managing Community Open Source Brands Shane Curcuru (The Apache Software Foundation)
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5:00pm Frequently Asked and Infrequently Answered Questions About Software Patents Mishi Choudhary (Software Freedom Law Center), Deb Nicholson (Open Invention Network), Justin Colannino (Ropes & Gray LLP)
D139-140
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10:40am Thinking Big: Building a IaaS SDK for the Cloud Randi Harper (Amazon), Mitch Garnaat (Amazon)
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11:30am Building GoDaddy.com’s Compute Cloud Darren Shepherd (GoDaddy.com)
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1:40pm When Cloud Networking meets Cloud Computing: Software-Defined Networking (SDN) Mike Cohen (Big Switch Networks), Faan DeSwardt (Symantec)
E146
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10:40am Open Standards and Open Architecture in Global Health: Saving Lives with Open Source Paul Biondich (OpenMRS), Derek Ritz (ecGroup Inc.), Dykki Settle (IntraHealth International), Eduardo Jezierski (InSTEDD)
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11:30am Clinical DNA Sequencing: Software to Push Healthcare Forward Michael Italia (The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia)
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2:30pm Free the Code: The Case for the US Federal Government to Open Source Software as a Default Position Deborah Bryant (Red Hat), John Scott (RadiantBlue Technologies, Inc. )
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4:10pm OSEHRA - Building an Open Source EHR for All Luis Ibanez (KITWARE Inc.), Seong Ki Mun (OSEHRA), Rick Avila (KITWARE Inc.)
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5:00pm Nibbling at the heels of Commercial EMR Mohamed Elmallah (Children's Hospital of Los Angeles)
E147
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10:40am EFF's mission to Encrypt the Web Peter Eckersley (Electronic Frontier Foundation)
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11:30am Git For Ages 4 And Up Michael Schwern (eval Empire)
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2:30pm Development is Production Too John Goulah (Etsy), Erik Kastner (Kickstarter)
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4:10pm State of the MQ Brian Clapper (Circonus, Inc.)
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5:00pm Demystifying REST Kirsten Hunter (Akamai)
F150
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10:40am PhoneGap : Cross the Gap from HTML5 to Mobile Paul Beusterien (Mobile Developer Solutions)
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11:30am jQuery: Mobile Sites That Feel Like Apps Anna Filina (FooLab Inc.)
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2:30pm Mobile 3D Visualization Pat Marion (Kitware, Inc.), Utkarsh Ayachit (Kitware, Inc.)
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4:10pm Progressive Enhancement on the Mobile Web John Bender (Adobe Systems)
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5:00pm Viewports: Handling the many screens on the Mobile Web Joe Bowser (Adobe Systems)
F151
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10:40am We Are Superman: Transformative Capacities of Open Source Learning David Preston (The Preston Group)
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11:30am How Developers Can Transform K12 Education with UX Bob Regan (Pearson Foundation)
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4:10pm Legitimizing interest based learning with Mozilla Open Badges Tara Tiger Brown (UC Irvine), Chris McAvoy (Mozilla Foundation)
E141
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11:30am Spring in the Cloud Josh Long (Pivotal)
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1:40pm Ask A Google Engineer Anything Chris DiBona (Google, Inc.)
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2:30pm Building A Test/Dev Cloud With Apache CoudStack - Part 1 David Nalley (Apache CloudStack (incubating))
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4:10pm Building A Test/Dev Cloud With Apache CloudStack - Part 2 David Nalley (Apache CloudStack (incubating))
E142
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11:30am ElasticSearch, Your New Best Friend Harold Hannon (SoftLayer)
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2:30pm Adventures in Deploying Private Paas on the Open Cloud: Tales from the Enterprise Jeff Hobbs (ActiveState), Diane Mueller (ActiveState)
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4:10pm How X.commerce is building a platform on open source Saranyan Vigraham (x.commerce)
E143
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10:40am Wrangling Logs with Logstash and ElasticSearch Nate Jones (Media Temple), David Castro (Media Temple)
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1:40pm Drupal Commerce: Changing The Course Of eCommerce Mike O'Connor (Commerce Guys)
Expo Hall
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9:00am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Thursday Welcome Edd Dumbill (Silicon Valley Data Science), Sarah Novotny (NGINX)
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9:05am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Making Magic From Cloud To Client Mark R. Shuttleworth (Canonical Ltd.)
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9:30am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Open Source: A Recipe For Success John Mone (Endurance International Group)
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9:45am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
An Interview with Gianugo Rabellino Edd Dumbill (Silicon Valley Data Science), Gianugo Rabellino (Microsoft)
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9:55am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Disrupting Hardware: The Next Era of Openness Frank Frankovsky (Facebook)
10:10am Morning Break
Room: Exhibit Hall D
3:10pm Afternoon Break
Room: Exhibit Hall D
12:10pm Lunch
Room: Exhibit Hall E
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Javascript & HTML5
Essential Node.js for Web Developers
Mike Amundsen (Layer 7 Technologies)
Unlike some introductions to Node.js that spend time explaining event loops and web sockets, this session start with a typical “Hello, Node” demo and quickly moves to short, fully-functional pps that show how to deal with static files, POST forms, mashups from other servers, file manipulation, data-handling, and even supporting HTTP Authentication.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Javascript & HTML5
Node.js in Production: Postmortem Debugging and Performance Analysis
David Pacheco (Joyent)
While dynamic languages are extremely popular for rapid development, they're notoriously difficult to debug in production. Despite being a relative newcomer, Node.js has already developed sophisticated tools for both postmortem and runtime analysis that exceed those of many popular languages. We will discuss our work building and deploying such tools, including real-world production experiences.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Javascript & HTML5
Location, Location, Location: Mastering HTML 5 Geolocation
Andy Gup (Esri)
This session takes you through an in-depth look at the HTML 5 Geolocation API. We'll nail down what it is and how to use it effectively. Our tips and tricks will save you a ton of time. We'll demonstrate those key concepts through real-world demos that will also take you to the next step and show you several ways to analyze and make sense of the data.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Javascript & HTML5
Web Application Accessibility
Alice Boxhall (Google)
There are millions of software users with disabilities worldwide, yet many web application developers aren't aware of the techniques which can be used to make their software accessible. This talk will give an overview of what accessibility means and why it's important to you, a run-down of the technology and techniques for achieving it, and a look at how browsers provide accessibility support.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Javascript & HTML5
Mashing up JavaScript – Advanced techniques for modern web applications
Bastian Hofmann (ResearchGate GmbH)
Nowadays many modern web applications are solely relying on JavaScript to render their frontend. But if you want to create mashups, load data from many different places or include external widgets into your site, you are quickly running into boundaries because of browser and security restrictions. In this presentation I will talk about techniques helping you with such problems.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Javascript & HTML5
Wikipedia's Next Billion Users with WebFonts
Alolita Sharma (Wikimedia Foundation)
For the first time in Wikipedia's 11 year history, it rolled out open source WebFonts in January to make open knowledge more accessible to billions of readers in 14 major Indic languages. Learn more about how open source internationalization tools such as WebFonts, Narayam and language support are helping make valuable content on the Web more accessible.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Data
Digging into Open Data
Kim Rees (Periscopic)
Data, data everywhere, but not a structured bit. Open data is all the rage, but often this data is poorly formatted or not very accessible. This session will discuss various ways to pry open the oyster of public data.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Data
Google Government Public Data: Finding and delivering the world’s government, tabular data
Christopher Swenson (Simple)
The web consists of free-form links, and Google has excelled at quickly searching through this information. But, finding structured data, such as databases, spreadsheets, and tables is hard: they contain few links into and out of these documents. This talk discusses some of our efforts to find and present this data (focusing on government-generated), making it universally accessible and useful.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Data
InnoDB: Status, Architecture, and Latest Enhancements
Calvin Sun (Twitter)
This is a general session on InnoDB; give a brief overall of InnoDB architecture and its main features; Discuss the current state of InnoDB; also covers InnoDB roadmap.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Data
Advanced MySQL Replication Architectures
Luís Soares (Oracle)
This session presents how can MySQL replication be used in advanced setups for aggregating data from multiple masters, scaling out to hundreds of servers or even to integrate data into more esoteric slaves like non-relational stores.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Data
PostgreSQL's place in the new world order
Matthew Soldo (Heroku, Inc)
Recent shifts in the tech world - including PaaS, cloud-services, and NoSQL - have dramatically altered the manner in which software is written, deployed, and run. This talk will discuss how PostgreSQL fits into - and can potentially take advantage of - this world.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Data
Unlocking Proprietary Data with PostgreSQL Foreign Data Wrappers
Pat Patterson (Salesforce.com)
This session provides an overview of PostgreSQL 9.1 Foreign Data Wrappers, a mechanism for retrieving data from remote data sources. We will contrast the native C interface with the Python interface provided via the Multicorn project. A real-world example will retrieve business data from salesforce.com and combine it with data held in native PostgreSQL tables using a simple SQL JOIN.
10:40am-11:20am (40m)
Session
To be confirmed
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Java & JVM
The Art of Metaprogramming in Java
Abdelmonaim Remani (The NorCal Java User Group)
Metaprograming is the dirty little secret behind the success of many Java frameworks such as Spring and Struts2, and constitutes the backbone of many of the most fundamental APIs across the JEE technology stack. This session aims introduce the topic and highlight with code examples the different mechanisms and techniques to take advantage of this underused feature of the Java Programming Language.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Java & JVM
Jython Concurrency: Leveraging the Java Platform with Python
Jim Baker (Canonical)
Jython is arguably the best Python implementation to target concurrent code. Jython has no GIL, it leverages the Java platform to provide robust support for concurrency in its runtime, and it enables access to a set of high-level abstractions from Java. This talk will walk through a series of motivating examples that emphasize Java integration.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Java & JVM
Threads & JRuby, the Simple Alternative to Evented
David Copeland (Stitch Fix)
Handling concurrency using events is getting a lot of focus these days, however it's not without its tradeoffs. By using powerful threading and concurrency libraries from the JVM, and the simple elegance of Ruby, developers can solve problems easily with maintainable and understandable code
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Java & JVM
Performance Tuning with Poor Tools and Cheap Drink
Kirk Pepperdine (Independent)
After a brief introduction to a methodology to performance tune Java applications, the audience will guide me through the steps needed to tune an application using a number of "poor" (open source) tools that will be instrumental in helping you, the audience, diagnose and repair these problems.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Java & JVM
Troubleshooting Slow or Hung Java Applications
William Au (CBS Interactive)
This session demonstrates how to troubleshoot the common problems that lead to hung and slow Java applications by going through case studies derived from actual problems we have seen on our production systems. Each case study is accompanied by a live demo of the tool best suited for troubleshooting that particular problem.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Programming
Dart: Google's evil plot to make it easier for you to build web apps
Bob Nystrom (Google)
Creating a new programming language, especially one for the browser is crazy! Is this a nefarious plot to break the open web and take over the world? Come see what we're doing and I'll show you how Dart can make it easier and more fun to build apps that play nice with JS and the web.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Programming
Efficient Web Applications with Erlang and Cowboy
Loïc Hoguin (Nine Nines)
Modern web services are expected to be capable of providing realtime services to a large number of concurrent connections from web browsers, and web API clients. Distributed systems are common. The fine grained concurrency, message oriented programming model and transparent distribution capabilities make Erlang well suited for these types of systems. Cowboy brings Erlang's power to the web.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Programming
Behind The Mirror - the birth of Light Table.
Chris Granger (Kodowa)
At Microsoft I had the unique opportunity to sit behind a one way mirror and watch people try to solve problems. Behind that mirror I learned we've done so very little to enable us to realize our creations and that our tools often cause us to stumble instead of propel us forward. In my talk we'll deconstruct what I learned to see how Light Table might be the future of tools.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Programming
On The Economics of Technical Debt
Abigail - (Booking.com)
We will look into when it make sense to reduce technical debt, and when it does not.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle, Programming, Tools and Techniques
Analyzing How Developers Learn Online For Fun and Profit
Keith Fahlgren (Safari Books Online)
Modern developers use an ever-expanding set of online tools to help them solve problems, develop skills, and get their work done. Analyzing the usage data from one of these tools reveals a surprising amount about emerging technologies and how some developers are learning more effectively.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Programming
Generic Programming Galore using D
Andrei Alexandrescu (Facebook)
The promises of generic programming – ultimate reuse, unprecedented flexibility, and low abstraction penalties - have been difficult to fulfill. This talk explores how a few difficult generic programming tasks can be realized in the D programming language.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Python
Django doesn't scale! (And what you can do about it.)
Jacob Kaplan-Moss (Revolution Systems, LLC)
You'll often hear that some web framework "doesn't scale". Well, it's true! Django, like all web frameworks. offers a ton of shortcuts for common cases, but as sites grow these shortcuts come at the cost of performance. However, you don't have to throw the baby out with the bathwater; come to this talk to hear how you can win back performance while hanging on to the framework you love.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Python
Large Django sites at Mozilla
Andy McKay (Mozilla)
Mozilla's add-ons site serves a few billion hits a day through Python. This talk covers how the site is built, how it scales, the fun we had on the way and tools that you can use from it.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Python
Python += Women: Increasing Engagement
Lynn Root (PyLadies SF)
Are you a woman wanting to break into the engineering field? Or do you know any women wanting to learn how to code, but don't know how to help them? Perhaps our nerdy ladies are a bit shy to ask for help. That's okay! I'll give you some tools to nudge you in the right direction.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Python
Connecting to Twitter & Google+ using Python
wesley chun (Google)
Twitter and Google+ are examples of the highly active and popular social media scene today. Using Python, you can easily execute searches on both. All you need is a client library (easily found), and you can get going without a lot of effort!
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Python
Demystifying Python Metaclasses
Eric Wills (University of Oregon/Vizme)
Metaclasses are a commonly misunderstood and misrepresented topic in Python. This session will introduce metaclasses, explore the added functionality they provide, and look at some real world examples of metaclasses as we use them in server-side web development at Vizme.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Python
Inside Python
Thomas Lee (New Relic)
Ever wondered how you might experiment with your own syntax changes to the Python programming language? Learn about the internals of Python as I dissect the steps required to introduce a new keyword to the language.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Perl
What's New in Perl?
Ricardo Signes (Pobox.com)
Ricardo Signes (rjbs), the Perl 5 project lead, will tell you about all the changes in Perl 5.10 through 5.16 that will affect your daily life, with a focus on things you should and shouldn't use.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Perl
Taming Perl Regexes
Damian Conway (Thoughtstream)
Perl regexes are the wolverines of the programming world: compact, immensely powerful, and with a nasty tendency to maul you, when and where you least expect it. This talk demonstrates and explains a new Perl module (Regexp::Debugger) that helps tame unruly regexes by providing live interactive run-time visualizations of any regex in your code, as that regex matches.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Perl
Writing Non-blocking Code for Interaction With Data Systems and Web Services in Node.js and Perl
Jay Janssen (Percona, Inc.)
Illustrated guide to how to write non-blocking code for Perl (and some Javascript). Goal for this session is to give some familiarity to high-level non-blocking APIs for engineers who want to dig into non-blocking programming.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Perl
YARRR! Plundering Programming Paradigms for Profit!
Piers Cawley (Thermeon)
Avast ye scurvy dogs! Strap yerselves in fer a pirate voyage around the islands of code! Feast yer eyes on the treasures of the mystic land of Haskell, the thifthing thands of lithp. Gasp at beautiful objects from Smalltalk and develop an eye for plundering programming pearls wherever you find 'em. Then bring 'em all back to the good ship 'Black Perl' use 'em for fun and profit. YARRR!
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Perl
Cooking Perl with Chef
David Golden (Bunchmail)
Do you like the idea of repeatable, automated Perl application deployment? Me, too! This talk will show how to make Chef play nice with Perl. You'll learn how to weave together some great tools like perlbrew, local::lib, and carton to isolate your apps and manage them all with Chef.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Perl
Unicode Support Shootout: The Good, the Bad, the Mostly Ugly
Tom Christiansen (TCPC)
How does Unicode support stack up across major platforms, including Java, Perl, Python, Ruby, and more? Who’s doing the best job, and who’s failing miserably? Is anyone doing a good job? Does anyone actually implement to standard, and to what extent? I’ll compare the major platforms to separate the losers from the not-so-losers.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) UX
Storytelling a Better User Experience
Paul Tashima (Nebula Inc.)
This session will explore how storytelling techniques reflect core design approaches. From folklore to modern cinema, the way in which we tell good stories may help guide the way in which we design good user experience.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) UX
Designing effective visualisations: matching data problems to our perceptual strengths
Hadley Wickham (Rice University / RStudio)
Learn the essential bits of cognitive psychology to create effect visualisations that convey what you want them to convey.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Open Hardware
The Yocto Project: Professional Tools for Embedded Linux
Jeffrey Osier-Mixon (Intel Corporation)
The Yocto Project™ is an open source collaboration project that provides tools to enable you create custom Linux-based systems for embedded products. This presentation describes the project in detail, contrasts it with other existing solutions, and provides a working example showing how you can create your own embedded distribution, with or without hardware.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Open Hardware
Making Hardware Open: Challenges and Opportunities
Frank Frankovsky (Facebook) et al
Facebook's Frank Frankovsky will lead a panel of industry leaders in a discussion of the challenges and opportunities in building open source movements around hardware. Frank will share key learnings from the Open Compute Project (a prominent industry initiative focused on driving greater openness and collaboration in infrastructure technology) and draw out similar insights from the panel.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m)
Session
To be confirmed
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Open Hardware
Bonescript: Simplified Physical Computing with Node.JS
Jason Kridner (Texas Instruments)
Event-based I/O with JavaScript on embedded Linux provides single-language development of web-based visual monitors and controls with a broad range of sensors and actuators. Simple open hardware and software examples enable rich, affordable collaboration upon Linux. Connecting various sensor types, building Processing.JS-based visualizations and sharing your creation are also covered.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Community
Girl Developers will Save the World!
Cheryl Miller (greenlight for girls Foundation)
Greenlightforgirls.org is a Brussels-based, international NGO promoting science, technology, engineering and mathematics to girls of all ages and backgrounds. We promote female role models from technical sectors to youngsters, and run events which inspire girls to study and pursue careers in technical areas, including computers. With this knowledge, we believe girls will save the world!
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Community
Effecting Organizational Change
Kane McLean (Open Source for America)
Change is hard for individuals, and harder for organizations. Understanding how to navigate the forces affecting our habits and willpower will enable you to set about effecting real change in your organization. Discussed in terms of grassroots, clouds, elephants and jockeys, this practical perspective redefines the challenge of cultural change.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
The Art of Organizational Manipulation
Brian Fitzpatrick (Google, Inc.) et al
We often hear engineers lament how hard it is to get anything done inside of a big company. The trick to overcoming this is to know the right people, understand how power flows in the organization, and, most importantly, what you can get away with and when. We'll help you understand the human element of navigating companies both big and small through a series of (hopefully) amusing anecdotes.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
Open Source: The Next Generation
Nóirín Plunkett (Eucalyptus Systems) et al
This year's college students never had a Commodore 64 - it had been discontinued before they were born. They've grown up with the internet and Google - they're smart, and they're already coding. This talk looks at how we can make open source relevant to the Facebook generation, how our communities can adapt to recognize their itches, and how we can benefit from their insight and work.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
Ubuntu Home Hacks
Allison Randal (DrugDev, Inc.)
Inspired by a friend's X10-wired house in the 1990's, this talk is a modern take on the "smart home", searching for a more organic connection to our digital selves.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Community
Building a free Java community with deep roots
Martijn Verburg (jClarity) et al
Based on our experiences with the LJC and other OSS projects we cover several tips and tricks used to build a vibrant community of thousands of passionate developers and get those communities working with each other and how to deal with conflicts and other war stories!
10:40am-11:20am (40m) PHP
Why would you use PHP for a startup?
Luke Welling ([Redacted])
PHP has rarely been a fashionable language, so it's probably no surprise that it is not high fashion for startups today. What advantages influence the startups that choose it? Ignoring loss of hipster cred, what real disadvantages do they face? What features of other language ecosystems are missing or underused in PHP?
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) PHP
A Stitch In Time Saves Nine: Solving the N+1 Problem
Paul Jones (http://paul-m-jones.com/)
When dealing with databases, developers frequently run into the N+1 problem, in which they populate domain objects via queries in loops. This causes terrible performance drags. The talk shows how to solve the N+1 problem in plain PHP as well as Postgres. It concludes with a way of automating the PHP side, and includes editorializing about the origins of the N+1 problem in the developer mindset.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) PHP, Programming
Inside PHP
Thomas Lee (New Relic)
So you know the PHP language back to front, you know all the frameworks, and you've churned out countless native PHP modules in C -- but have you ever wondered how you might toy with the PHP language itself? Come along and learn a little more about the inside of your favourite programming language as I guide you through the process of adding a new keyword to the language.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) PHP
Testing Untestable Code
Stephan Hochdörfer (bitExpert AG)
Automated software testing is an widely-adopted standard today. Unfortunately there exist applications that are not testable by their design. In the first part of the session it is shown how the dynamic nature of PHP can be used to manipulate such dependencies. In the second part of the session an additional layer gets introduced which transforms parts of components into testable code fragments.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m)
Session
To be confirmed
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) PHP
What every web developer should know about database optimization
Steve Meyers (Utah Open Source Foundation)
Most developers are developers, not DBAs, yet many smaller companies have inadequate database experience in-house. This is largely because databases like MySQL and PostgreSQL don't necessarily require a full-time DBA to administer. It's become more important for developers at smaller companies to have some basic knowledge of how to keep their database happy.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Business
Building PhoneGap at Nitobi and then Adobe: Free Software in Small and Large Corporations
Brian LeRoux (Adobe Systems)
Nitobi Software quietly lead a mobile web revolution creating and fostering the PhoneGap project eventually growing it to millions of users worldwide. In late 2011, Nitobi was acquired by Adobe Systems. This talk will go through the transition of small software consultancy working part time on a free software project growing into a small team in a large company dedicated to the same project.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Business
US Government v. Open Source: A History and Lessons Learned
Karl Fogel (Open Tech Strategies, LLC) et al
We've assembled the first comprehensive history of open source in the US government -- all the major events, publications, policy, and code releases we could collect. And it's mashable. From that data, we learn how the government adopts open source, how policies affects adoption, and how governments have most effectively encouraged their own open source use.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Business
Pivoting an African Open Source Project
David Kobia (Ushahidi Inc)
Ushahidi, an open source project had many early successes in crowdsourced mapping and has had to deal with issues of scale, accessibility and security with ever increasing geo-political concerns. Ushahidi has also taken aim at big data’s problems of verification, aggregation and context with a tool called SwiftRiver. We’ve had many interesting challenges. Join us for lessons and dialogue.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Business
Bootstrap
Jacob Thornton (Twitter)
What was learnt during Bootstraps rapid rise to the number one position on github? What went wrong? What went right? How were we lucky? What's coming next? CSS. Markup. JS. Co-authoring. Community. Press. A new toolkit. A new language.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Business
Managing Community Open Source Brands
Shane Curcuru (The Apache Software Foundation)
What is the single most valuable part of an open source project? Its brand. When everyone can fork your code on their own, a project's brand is the most important thing to understand and maintain for the benefit of the project's core technical community. Learn how communities can intelligently manage their reputation, and companies can respectfully use the brand.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Business
Frequently Asked and Infrequently Answered Questions About Software Patents
Mishi Choudhary (Software Freedom Law Center) et al
The intense commercial competition between technology companies is driving large volumes of complex and often multi-jurisdictional patent litigation. With the de facto possibility of patenting software related ideas in various countries, free and open source software developers must understand the patent risks inherent in the development and distribution of their software.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Cloud
Thinking Big: Building a IaaS SDK for the Cloud
Randi Harper (Amazon) et al
More and more companies, large and small, are using open source software. Sometimes, in addition to just using the software they also want to try to support the development efforts. How hard could that be?
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Cloud
Building GoDaddy.com’s Compute Cloud
Darren Shepherd (GoDaddy.com)
Learn how GoDaddy.com built its Cloud Computing IaaS product with a team of less than 10 people. See how we leveraged open source and existing technologies to accelerate our development, what worked, and what didn’t. Learn how we built a reliable infrastructure on top of non-reliable messaging and an eventually consistent model using Redis, Apache CouchDB, Node.js, and Apache ZooKeeper.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Cloud
When Cloud Networking meets Cloud Computing: Software-Defined Networking (SDN)
Mike Cohen (Big Switch Networks) et al
SDN is the promise of bringing comparable programmability to the network by abstracting a logical view from the underlying infrastructure for more agility, flexibility, scalability but also for more innovation, looking at networks in a new way and allowing for better synergies with applications running on it. 2012 is poised to be a pivotal year with production deployments, new players and more.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Cloud
A Look at The Network: Searching for Truth in Distributed Applications
Scott Andreas (Boundary, Inc)
This session explores the concept of the network as a source of truth for distributed applications and offers a deep-dive into higher-level problems that often manifest early at level 3. Tying network and application behavior together offers a powerful cocktail for finding and fixing problems in distributed applications quickly while also ensuring timely responses to clients spread across the net.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Cloud
Automating Cloud Deployments with and Puppet and OpenStack
Dan Bode (PuppetLabs)
This presentation will cover how OpenStack (an open source infrastructure as a service platform) and Puppet (an open source configuration management language) can be integrated to deploy and manage your own private cloud.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Ops
Develop and Test Configuration Management Scripts with Vagrant
Mitchell Hashimoto (HashiCorp)
Whether you use Chef, Puppet, or just basic shell scripting, there seems to be no clear way to incrementally develop and test scripts to provision a system. In this talk I'll introduce using local virtual machines managed by Vagrant as a way to achieve this, shortening the feedback loop and increasing productivity and confidence of configuration management script development.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Healthcare
Open Standards and Open Architecture in Global Health: Saving Lives with Open Source
Paul Biondich (OpenMRS) et al
Open standards and open architecture support developing countries to build systems in a more thoughtful and pragmatic way. Through this approach, and using these tools, we can follow an example of how Rwanda has begun to design and develop a national health information system, and how this will allow other countries to do the same, more quickly and more effectively then ever before
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Healthcare
Clinical DNA Sequencing: Software to Push Healthcare Forward
Michael Italia (The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia)
For more than a decade, people have imagined a future where the sequencing of a person's DNA would be as routine a medical practice as a visit to the doctor. We now stand on the cusp of this future, but the volume and complexity of the data exceed our ability to interpret it. Within this challenge lies a major opportunity for software to make a difference in the future of medicine.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Healthcare
Hacking your body: Running as performance tuning
Dave Neary (Red Hat)
Your body is a machine. If you jog or run, then by mixing things up, you can help make that machine run more efficiently. This talk will cover the basics of how to establish a performance baseline, constructing a training program to improve performance, and then measuring the improvements.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Community
Free the Code: The Case for the US Federal Government to Open Source Software as a Default Position
Deborah Bryant (Red Hat) et al
Long-time open source advocate in government Deb Bryant takes off the gloves and talks about legislators and lobbyists, policy wonks and pundits, bureaucrats and and advocates. It's just the fodder you’ll need to get behind a new national technology imperative; recycle US Federal investments in software into the innovation economy while taking control of their own software destiny.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Healthcare
OSEHRA - Building an Open Source EHR for All
Luis Ibanez (KITWARE Inc.) et al
The Department of Veterans Affairs spawned in July 2011 the creation of OSEHRA, a non-profit organization whose mission is to apply best practices of open source software development to the improvement and maintenance of Open Source EHR information systems that are freely available for all. Please join us in this session to hear about the current activities and future plans of OSEHRA.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Healthcare
Nibbling at the heels of Commercial EMR
Mohamed Elmallah (Children's Hospital of Los Angeles)
We have heard it before: "All or nothing." But when it comes to replacing your Enterprise EMR, it might not be the case. Commercial EMR and Open Source can coexist, decoupling pieces from under the EMR closed platform to an Open Source stack. Opening new horizons to your customization and development effort, providing more functionality to your medical staff without burdening your upgrade path.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Tools and Techniques
EFF's mission to Encrypt the Web
Peter Eckersley (Electronic Frontier Foundation)
EFF has a long-term plan to switch the insecure, unencrypted Web of 2009 over to an encrypted Web of 2013 or 2014. This talk will summarize our methods, successes to date (including HTTPS Everywhere, the SSL Observatory, and the crazy things we had to do to get them to work as Firefox and Chrome extensions) and a number of research and protocol-development projects that are in the pipeline.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Tools and Techniques
Git For Ages 4 And Up
Michael Schwern (eval Empire)
Learn how to think like a Git using nothing more than children's toys! If you’re using git, but are uncomfortable with it and don’t really get it, this is for you. WARNING: CHOKING HAZARD – Small Parts. Not For Children Under 4 Years.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Tools and Techniques
Everything you ever wanted to know about deployment but were afraid to ask
Laura Thomson (Mozilla Corporation)
Web developers dream of continuous deployment: new code in production without a hitch. In this talk I'll cover the full story from building deployable code through working out a build and release process through continuous integration, automation, and continuous deployment. We'll also look at deployment velocity and why CD might not be for you.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Tools and Techniques
Development is Production Too
John Goulah (Etsy) et al
Its common to discuss the production environment in public but it is a black art on how to construct the development environment correctly, in fact it is a common problem that development doesn’t closely mirror the production experience. We will address why this is important, some common anti-patterns, and how it can be done correctly.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Tools and Techniques
State of the MQ
Brian Clapper (Circonus, Inc.)
Message Queues are a hot topic, but not all are created equal. After reviewing most of the popular choices, I will review my findings and offer suggestions for which to use when, and pros and cons of each. On the list are RabbitMQ, Kafka, Apache Qpid, Kestrel, ZeroMQ and more as time permits.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Programming
Demystifying REST
Kirsten Hunter (Akamai)
Web services are everywhere! I'll give you the context you need to use REST web services, and - more importantly - give you the tools you need to debug what's happening while you do. Attendees will be taught how to understand, sniff and debug HTTP traffic to debug web service calls. They will be given a brief overview of REST web services and an overview of how OAuth authentication works.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Mobile
PhoneGap : Cross the Gap from HTML5 to Mobile
Paul Beusterien (Mobile Developer Solutions)
Create, develop, and deploy mobile applications with JavaScript, HTML, and CSS using PhoneGap.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Mobile
jQuery: Mobile Sites That Feel Like Apps
Anna Filina (FooLab Inc.)
jQuery Mobile is a cross-platform framework made for smartphones and tablets. With its HTML5 interface, it looks and feels like an app. This presentation will teach you how to quickly create a mobile front-end with little effort. It will also feature a use-case of adapting an existing web application to the mobile.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Mobile
Topics in Designing An Android Sensor Subsystem: Pitfalls and Considerations
Jen Costillo (Rebel Bot)
A logical approach to designing an Android sensor subsystem within a consumer product. At the outset it appears simple but once tasked it is a monumental effort with several complex trade-offs. The approach covers vendor algorithms, power, and latency issues in addition to the overall end to end architecture (sensor selection though plumbing libraries into the sensor frameworks).
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Mobile
Mobile 3D Visualization
Pat Marion (Kitware, Inc.) et al
Advanced 3D visualization has long been relegated to powerful workstations or supercomputers. Recent efforts have extended the open source, scientific computing tools VTK and ParaView to run on the popular Android and iOS mobile platforms. This proposal shows how to run and interact with Big Data on mobile platforms, as well as perform advanced visualization directly on the mobile device.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Mobile
Progressive Enhancement on the Mobile Web
John Bender (Adobe Systems)
Progressive Enhancement isn't important on the mobile web because all the browsers are Webkit right? Not so fast. Even among Webkit implementations events, css, and performance vary widely. We'll talk about the darker corners of the mobile web and show how jQuery Mobile can help you build sites that are reliable, accessible, and support more devices.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Mobile
Viewports: Handling the many screens on the Mobile Web
Joe Bowser (Adobe Systems)
The mobile web is now the ubiquitious web. Modern web developers building mobile web applications need to consider the many different devices with many screen sizes and densities. This talk focuses on the different techniques on how to deal with this on the web, regardless of whether this app is a website or a native application built using a framework such as PhoneGap.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Education
We Are Superman: Transformative Capacities of Open Source Learning
David Preston (The Preston Group)
Forget what you think you know about school and education policy: the unevenly distributed future is here. Open source learning is no longer hypothetical. Learners are using open source values, organizing principles and tools to construct experiences and networks that inspire, support achievement, and create previously unimagined opportunity for expansion.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Education
How Developers Can Transform K12 Education with UX
Bob Regan (Pearson Foundation)
With so much digital content out there, why aren’t schools yet digital? It’s because so much educational software and experiences are hard to use, hard to find and hard to integrate with existing tools. Come discuss concrete ways developers can help to bootstrap the community of educators working to transform schools.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Education
Using OASIS DITA Learning Maps to Align with Standards and Model Learning Pathways
John Hunt (IBM)
The Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) is an OASIS specification that defines a set of XML doc types for authoring and organizing topic-oriented information, including maps to sequence topics and other resources into structured collections, and taxonomy-driven metadata to classify content. Attend this session to learn about DITA features supporting interop standards for K-12 education.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Education
Advancing the State of the Art in Formative Assessment Development and Distribution
Evan Eustace (CoreSpring)
Development and exchange of formative assessments are hampered by inconsistent implementation of standards that do exist, and silo-ed data with static transfer between systems. CoreSpring,org is building an open library of formative assessment content aligned to new teaching standards, and a suite of tools and open APIs to facilitate development, distribution and data analysis.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Education
Legitimizing interest based learning with Mozilla Open Badges
Tara Tiger Brown (UC Irvine) et al
Self directed, interest based learning needs validation, Mozilla's Open Badges Infrastructure opens learning accreditation to all. We'll cover the current thinking around interest based learning, and dive into the implementation details of the Mozilla Open Badges infrastructure, which provides a framework for recognizing and legitimizing self directed interest based learning.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Education
Building an Ecosystem of FLOSS to Educate Students with Disabilities
Gerardo Capiel (TBD)
Benetech's Literacy program is revolutionizing access to educational materials for print disabled students (e.g. blind, dyslexic, quadraplegic). It is accomplishing this goal by leveraging and contributing to an end-to-end ecosystem of FLOSS technologies to make sure that as the educational content landscape rapidly evolves print-disabled students are as “plugged-in” as their peers.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Why Open Matters: HP Cloud Services Designed With OpenStack™ Technology
Blake Yeager (Hewlett Packard)
HP’s public cloud is built on OpenStack open-source cloud technology. The OpenStack project has rapidly been adopted as the leading open source cloud solution because it avoids vendor lock-in, and is ubiquitous across public, managed and private clouds.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Spring in the Cloud
Josh Long (Pivotal)
Let's face it, the cloud's here to stay. Spring's always been about portability and choice, and the cloud is no different. Join Josh Long as he introduces how to use Cloud Foundry and Spring.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Ask A Google Engineer Anything
Chris DiBona (Google, Inc.)
First done at OSCON 2010, we though this session was extremely useful in helping developers work better with Googlers and Google technology and we’ll be able answer most questions that they might be baffled about.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Building A Test/Dev Cloud With Apache CoudStack - Part 1
David Nalley (Apache CloudStack (incubating))
Come learn about Apache CloudStack, its architecture, and how to deploy it - and then how to connect it to your configuration management system and continuous integration to achieve an incredibly robust and flexible dev/test environment.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Building A Test/Dev Cloud With Apache CloudStack - Part 2
David Nalley (Apache CloudStack (incubating))
Come learn about Apache CloudStack, its architecture, and how to deploy it - and then how to connect it to your configuration management system and continuous integration to achieve an incredibly robust and flexible dev/test environment.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Open Source in the Enterprise: Telecommunications and Contact Centers
Jared Smith (Bluehost)
In his talk, Jared Smith will talk about telecommunications systems built on open source software, and how they can give you better productivity and agility, all while saving you money. He'll also highlight Bluehost's use of open source software to run its contact centers.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
ElasticSearch, Your New Best Friend
Harold Hannon (SoftLayer)
So you have a ton of data that you need to search efficiently. How do you do it? Make friends with search. Index and search solutions can provide distinct advantages over traditional RDBMS systems for storing and querying large data sets. Learn how to leverage elasticsearch, an open source search solution, for fast and painless indexing and querying of data.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
DRBD -- High Availability Storage Replication for Today and Tomorrow
Cooper Stevenson (LINBIT)
In this session Cooper Stevenson will present DRBD, the Linux kernel approved high availability storage replication solution.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Adventures in Deploying Private Paas on the Open Cloud: Tales from the Enterprise
Jeff Hobbs (ActiveState) et al
In this presentation, ActiveState CTO Jeff Hobbs and Cloud Evangelist Diane Mueller discuss the challenges, drama, and realities of deploying private Platform as a Service (PaaS) on OpenStack and CloudStack.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
How X.commerce is building a platform on open source
Saranyan Vigraham (x.commerce)
X.commerce is a new business unit in the eBay Inc. family that is revolutionizing commerce for consumers, merchants and developers. In this presentation, we will look at how our technology strategy aligns with open source principles and how open source is helping X.commerce achieve its vision, with both technical solutions and a community-driven strategy.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Wrangling Logs with Logstash and ElasticSearch
Nate Jones (Media Temple) et al
Learn how to use open source to build an enterprise grade log processing and searching solution that scales. We’ll cover the challenges and all the software that makes a diy solution possible: logstash, elasticsearch, rabbitmq and Kibana. We’ll cover a practical use case with examples and provide you with everything you need to get up and running.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Design and Debug HTML5 Apps for Devices with Rapid Interface Builder (RIB) and Web Simulator
Gail Frederick (Intel)
Learn how to build UI for and debug HTML5 apps for mobile devices using Rapid Interface Builder (RIB) and Web Simulator, two open-source tools recently released by Intel. This session dives deep into the feature sets of both Web app developer tools, with demos, and shows you how you can influence the future of these open-source projects.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Drupal Commerce: Changing The Course Of eCommerce
Mike O'Connor (Commerce Guys)
With over 15,000 sites in operation right now, Drupal Commerce is changing the course of how eCommerce is done, allowing E-retailers to break the mold of the catalog-and-checkout process, while remaining true to its community roots. This session will provide a point of view on the new innovations of eCommerce and how Drupal Commerce is becoming the framework of choice for eCommerce innovators.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Working with Python 2.6 and 3.2 on the same machine (without virtualenv)
Langdon White (Red Hat)
Have you ever needed to work on applications in two different versions of the same language at the same time? There are many ways to do this, most of which involve a lot of mechanics or are custom to a single language or both.
10:00am-5:00pm (7h)
Thursday Expo Hall Activities
From products, projects, and parties to snacks, swag, and speakers, the 2012 OSCON Expo Hall will be the place to gather outside of sessions on Wednesday and Thursday. Test drive new tools, compare products, meet with nonprofit volunteers, say hello to speakers and authors, get your Make on, hang out in the lounge, and much more.
9:00am-9:05am (5m) Keynote
Thursday Welcome
Edd Dumbill (Silicon Valley Data Science) et al
Opening remarks by the OSCON program chairs, Sarah Novotny and Edd Dumbill.
9:05am-9:30am (25m) Keynote
Making Magic From Cloud To Client
Mark R. Shuttleworth (Canonical Ltd.)
Seamless work and play across phones, tablet and desktops is the goal of Ubuntu's design efforts. Mark will demo some of the latest inventions in UX in Ubuntu, preview new features that will land in 12.10, and outline the key areas of research and discovery as we move into a world where "personal computing" is being redefined and reinvented.
9:30am-9:45am (15m) Keynote
Open Source: A Recipe For Success
John Mone (Endurance International Group)
Through its ubiquitous presence in small business, Open Source has become a key, but unrecognized, driver of the U.S. economy. John will discuss the hidden impact of Open Source and what it means to contributors and project leaders. He’ll also provide important tips on making it easy to increase exposure of projects through code contributors and distribution platforms.
9:45am-9:55am (10m) Keynote
An Interview with Gianugo Rabellino
Edd Dumbill (Silicon Valley Data Science) et al
Microsoft's journey into open source has been eventful, and even unexpected. Ten years ago, few would have predicted the importance to the company of projects such Node.JS, Hadoop and even Linux.
9:55am-10:10am (15m) Keynote
Disrupting Hardware: The Next Era of Openness
Frank Frankovsky (Facebook)
In this talk, Facebook's Frank Frankovsky will examine key moments from the history of open hardware and share learnings from his work on the Open Compute Project — a prominent industry initiative focused on driving greater openness and collaboration in infrastructure technology — to draw out insights on how we can create and sustain open source movements in hardware.
10:10am-10:40am (30m)
Break: Morning Break
3:10pm-4:10pm (1h)
Break: Afternoon Break
12:10pm-1:40pm (1h 30m)
Break: Lunch
<div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 6:00pm-9:00pm (3h) Event </div> <div class="en_popup_name">AWS Developer Resources Beer Social (SOLD OUT)</div> <div class="en_popup_desc">Come meet the Amazon Web Services Developer Resources team at the Green Dragon brewpub (928 SE 9th Ave) on Thursday evening. Drinks and snacks are on us! RSVP required. </div> </div> <div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 7:00pm-11:00pm (4h) </div> <div class="en_popup_name">Thursday Birds of a Feather Sessions (BoFs)</div> <div class="en_popup_desc">Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions provide face to face exposure to those interested in the same projects and concepts. BoFs can be organized for individual projects or broader topics (best practices, open data, standards). BoFs are entirely up to you. We post your topic and provide the space and time. You provide the engaging topic. </div> </div> <div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 7:00pm-9:00pm (2h) Perl </div> <div class="en_popup_name">State of the Onion &amp; Perl Lightning Talks</div> <div class="en_popup_speaker">Jim Brandt (Best Practical Solutions) et al</div> <div class="en_popup_desc">Join us for the annual State of the Onion address with Larry Wall and the ever popular Perl Lightning Talks. </div> </div> <div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 9:00pm-12:00am (3h) Event </div> <div class="en_popup_name">Citrix Open Cloud Poker Party (sponsored by Citrix)</div> <div class="en_popup_desc">Citrix is sponsoring a night of poker, pizza and beer. For one night only, OSCON&#x27;s Hall E will be transformed into Portland&#x27;s only poker room complete with professional dealers. </div> </div>

Sponsors

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the conference, contact Sharon Cordesse at (707) 827-7065 or scordesse@oreilly.com.

View a complete list of OSCON contacts