OSCON 2012 Schedule

Below are the confirmed and scheduled talks at OSCON 2012 (schedule subject to change).

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Create your own OSCON schedule using the personal scheduler function. Mark the tutorials, sessions, keynotes, and events you want to attend by clicking on the calendar icon [calendar icon] next to each listing. Then click on "personal schedule" below and get your own customized schedule generated.

Portland 251
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10:40am Mind-blowing apps with HTML5 Canvas David Geary (Clarity Training, Inc.)
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11:30am JavaScript Libraries You Aren't Using...Yet Nathaniel Schutta (ntschutta.com)
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1:40pm You Ain't SPDY Chris Strom (EEE Computes)
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2:30pm Test Driven UI Development Joakim Recht (Tradeshift)
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4:10pm What's Up with HTML5 Video? Scott Davis (ThirstyHead.com)
Portland 252
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10:40am Apache Hadoop - The Future is Now Arun Murthy (Hortonworks Inc.)
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1:40pm Scaling near-realtime analytics with Kafka and HBase Dave Revell (Urban Airship), Nate Putnam (Urban Airship )
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2:30pm Sensor Network Data Collection and Storage Charles Bell (Oracle)
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4:10pm Hybrid Applications with MongoDB and RDBMS Steve Francia (10gen)
Portland 255
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11:30am Exploring Java 8 Technology Martijn Verburg (jClarity), Ben Evans (jClarity)
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1:40pm Above the Clouds: Introducing Akka Jonas Bonér (Typesafe)
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2:30pm Lightweight Web Apps with Ratpack Tim Berglund (GitHub)
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4:10pm Concurrent Programming Using The Disruptor Trisha Gee (MongoDB)
D135
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11:30am Writing a Django e-Commerce Framework David Winterbottom (Tangent Labs)
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1:40pm Permission or Forgiveness? Alex Martelli (Google), Anna Martelli Ravenscroft (Self)
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2:30pm Using Python to Solve Computationally Hard Problems Rachael Madsen (Optimal Design Software LLC)
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4:10pm Bootstrapping Django with Ease Mike Biglan (Twenty Ideas), M Wiggins (Concentric Sky), Josh Bothun (Concentric Sky)
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5:00pm Moving from Apps to Services Craig Kerstiens (Heroku)
D136
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10:40am Perl 5: Today, Tomorrow, and Christmas Ricardo Signes (Pobox.com)
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11:30am Programming in the Future Eric Wilhelm (Cisco, Inc.)
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1:40pm Profiling memory usage of Perl applications Tim Bunce (TigerLead)
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2:30pm Introduction to Git for the Perl Hacker Mark Allen (Mark Allen)
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4:10pm The O'Reilly Author Experience Matt Neuburg (TidBITS)
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5:00pm The Conway Channel Damian Conway (Thoughtstream)
Portland 256
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10:40am The Path to Go 1 Andrew Gerrand (Google), Rob Pike (Google, Inc.)
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11:30am C++11 as a new language Thiago Macieira (Intel)
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1:40pm Effective Code Review Dan Menard (Netflix)
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2:30pm Modern Software Development Anti-patterns Martijn Verburg (jClarity), Ben Evans (jClarity)
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4:10pm Designing Hypermedia APIs Steve Klabnik (Jumpstart Lab)
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5:00pm What Makes a Great Open API? John Musser (ProgrammableWeb)
D138
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10:40am Harnessing the Good Intentions of Others for your OSS Project Llewellyn Falco (Spun Labs), Lynn Langit (Teaching Kids Programming)
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11:30am Open Source Community Growth as a User Experience Problem Asheesh Laroia (Eventbrite), Karen Rustad (OpenHatch)
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1:40pm Open Source 2.0: The Science of Community Management David Eaves (Eaves Consulting)
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2:30pm Scaling Your Community by Nurturing Leaders Meghan Gill (10gen)
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4:10pm Mind Over Machine--How-To Make Your Own Mind-Controlled Robot Mary Jane Kelly (Casaba Security)
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5:00pm Open Source tools for local history Brian Capouch (Saint Josephs College)
E144
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10:40am PHP in 2012 Rasmus Lerdorf (Etsy)
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11:30am PHP 5.4 Features You Will Actually Use Lorna Jane Mitchell (LornaJane)
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1:40pm I Can't Believe You Still Do It That Way:12 Years of PHP Best Practice Talks revisited Laura Thomson (Mozilla Corporation), Luke Welling ([Redacted])
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2:30pm Developing easily deployable PHP Applications John Mertic (SugarCRM)
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4:10pm Get Some Rest: Best RESTful API Practices Lorna Jane Mitchell (LornaJane)
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5:00pm Dependency Injection with PHP Bastian Hofmann (ResearchGate GmbH)
E145
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10:40am Living with Open Source Software Brian Olore (The Boeing Company), Katie Gengler (The Boeing Company)
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11:30am The Ten Commandments of Open Innovation Thierry Carrez (OpenStack)
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2:30pm Hiding Data Kills Innovation Gil Elbaz (Factual)
D139-140
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10:40am Comparing Open Source Private Cloud Platforms Lance Albertson (Oregon State University Open Source Lab)
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1:40pm Apache HTTPD 2.4.0: Watch out cloud! Jim Jagielski (ASF)
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2:30pm Apache ZooKeeper in Action Mahadev Konar (Hortonworks)
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5:00pm Programming with the OSS Cloud Stack Mike Amundsen (Layer 7 Technologies)
D137
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10:40am Open Sourcing User Experience Design Jeff Gothelf (Proof)
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11:30am Consumer Science and Product Development at Netflix Rochelle King (Netflix), Matt Marenghi (Netflix)
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1:40pm Arduino Hacking 101: Importing the Universe Federico Lucifredi (Canonical | Ubuntu)
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5:00pm Building a Home Automation Server Bruce Momjian (EnterpriseDB)
E146
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10:40am BodyTrack: Open Source Tools for Health Empowerment through Self-Tracking Anne Wright (CMU), Candide Kemmler (Fluxtream.com), Rich Gibson (Gigapan.org)
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11:30am Hacking Yourself: Hard Core Behavior Change Fred Trotter (FredTrotter.com)
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1:40pm Experience Sampling Experience Bob Evans (Google)
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4:10pm Don't Fear Unicode Jacinta Richardson (Perl Training Australia)
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5:00pm Global communities building open source Health IT platforms: The OpenMRS experience Paul Biondich (OpenMRS), Burke Mamlin (OpenMRS), Hamish Fraser (Partners In Health)
E147
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10:40am Scaling to 100+ APIs Joe Gregorio (Google)
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11:30am Open Data and Visualization in Smallest Federated Wiki Ward Cunningham (Cunningham & Cunningham, Inc.)
1:40pm TBC
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2:30pm The Secret Diaries of a Performance Tuning Superhero Steve Burton (AppDynamics)
5:00pm TBC
F150
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11:30am Remixing Android Marko Gargenta (Twitter)
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1:40pm Android Security Essentials Pragati Ogal Rai (PayPal, eBay Inc.)
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2:30pm Speech Enabling Android Applications Simon MacDonald (IBM), Bryce Curtis (IBM)
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4:10pm MongoDB Geospatial and Android Paul Scott (DSTV Online), Herman Smith (Touchlab)
F151
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10:40am The Shared Learning Collaborative Sharren Bates (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation)
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1:40pm Open Education Analytics Infrastructure: How we enable the next 10 years. Greg Grossmeier (Creative Commons), Steve Midgley (US Department of Education)
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2:30pm Big Little Boolean: The FERPA Restriction and You Michael Brewer (UGA: Franklin College OIT)
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5:00pm Designing Systems for Fluid Teacher Adoption Jonathan Briggs (Eastside Preparatory School)
E141
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10:40am A Deeper Look at the Enyo JavaScript Framework Dave Freeman (Hewlett Packard)
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1:40pm Designing for DevOps: Building Ops at New Relic Chris Kelly (New Relic)
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5:00pm Building Functional Hybrid Apps For The iPhone And Android Carlos Andreu (IBM), Michael Thompson (IBM)
E143
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10:40am Logging as Event Streams Brandon Philips (Rackspace, Inc)
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11:30am Why The Sequel To NoSQL Is SQL Ori Herrnstadt (FoundationDB)
E142
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10:40am Massively Scalable NoSQL with Apache Cassandra Jonathan Ellis (DataStax, Inc)
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1:40pm Running MongoDB for High Availability Greg Brockman (Stripe)
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2:30pm Open Innovation on Demand John Igoe (Dell), Winston Damarillo (Morphlabs), Russell P. Reeder (Media Temple, Inc.)
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4:10pm Taking the Guesswork Out of Implementing Hadoop Audrey Ng (Hewlett-Packard), Steve Watt (Hewlett-Packard)
Expo Hall
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5:40pm Event
Room: Expo Hall
Booth Crawl
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8:45am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Opening Welcome Edd Dumbill (Silicon Valley Data Science), Sarah Novotny (NGINX), Sam Adams (City of Portland, Oregon)
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8:50am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
The Science of Open Source Community Management David Eaves (Eaves Consulting)
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9:05am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
The Learning Map Danny Hillis (Applied Minds, LLC)
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9:20am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
The Mudslide Hypothesis of Science Kaitlin Thaney (Digital Science)
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9:35am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Scaling OpenStack Technology. Lessons From The Field Brian Aker (HP)
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9:50am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
The Clothesline Paradox and the Sharing Economy Tim O'Reilly (O'Reilly Media, Inc.)
10:10am Morning Break
Room: Exhibit Hall D
3:10pm Afternoon Break - Sponsored by DataStax
Room: Exhibit Hall D
12:10pm Lunch - Sponsored by Google
Room: Exhibit Hall E
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Javascript & HTML5
Mind-blowing apps with HTML5 Canvas
David Geary (Clarity Training, Inc.)
This talk is a demo-fueled, fast-paced introduction to HTML5 Canvas.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Javascript & HTML5
JavaScript Libraries You Aren't Using...Yet
Nathaniel Schutta (ntschutta.com)
Believe it or not, the JavaScript party hasn't stopped. What other libraries are out there? What do they offer? This talk will survey the field of modern JavaScript libraries getting you up to speed on what's new.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Javascript & HTML5
You Ain't SPDY
Chris Strom (EEE Computes)
You package your assets. You use CSS sprites. You serve up everything with gzip compression. You obsess over Yslow recommendations. But you are still not SPDY. Fundamental limitations in HTTP and TCP/IP still add up to 60% overhead to your site. Find out how to reclaim that lost bandwidth and increase the robustness of your sites at the same time.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Javascript & HTML5
Test Driven UI Development
Joakim Recht (Tradeshift)
Testing HTML UIs - can it be done? Most people instinctively say no, but it doesn't have to be like that. Using technologies like Webdriver, Selenium, and Geb, it actually becomes possible, and we'll take a look at how.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Javascript & HTML5
What's Up with HTML5 Video?
Scott Davis (ThirstyHead.com)
If you are flummoxed with HTML5 video—browers, codecs, and containers—this is your talk. In a plain-spoken, easy to understand style, Scott Davis will help you cut through the hype and the hope and add video to your website.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Javascript & HTML5
WebRTC and the Future of Video Communications
Ben Strong (vline)
WebRTC is a new web standard for HD video calling and conferencing that will be supported in Chrome and Firefox this summer. We'll give an overview of the APIs and protocol stack and explore how it will change the way people communicate.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Data
Apache Hadoop - The Future is Now
Arun Murthy (Hortonworks Inc.)
The Apache Hadoop project is becoming the de-facto big-data platform. The community is gearing up the first major release of Hadoop in over 2 years. This talk will cover the major highlights of the release and also the mechanics of what it takes to deliver a major Hadoop release. Arun C Murthy is VP, Apache Hadoop at ASF and the Release Manager for this release.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Data
Storm: distributed and fault-tolerant realtime computation
Nathan Marz (Twitter)
Storm is an open-source realtime computation system relied upon by Twitter for much of its analytics. Storm does for realtime computation what Hadoop did for batch computation. It has a huge range of applications and combines ease of use with a robust foundation. Since being open-sourced, Storm has been adopted by over 25 companies.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Data
Scaling near-realtime analytics with Kafka and HBase
Dave Revell (Urban Airship) et al
Turning billions of events into near-realtime analytics is hard. Urban Airship collects events from hundreds of millions of mobile apps and turns them into meaningful analytics using open source technology like Hadoop, Kafka and HBase. We’ll cover near-realtime big data scaling techniques from the architectural level to the operational level.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Data
Sensor Network Data Collection and Storage
Charles Bell (Oracle)
Building sensor networks, while challenging, can be a data rich endeavor. But what do you do with all of the data you collect? How do you store and make sense of the results? Where do you store the information? This session explores the options available and demonstrates how to store the data in a database system for easy retrieval.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Data
Hybrid Applications with MongoDB and RDBMS
Steve Francia (10gen)
It is common to use multiple systems as part of the infrastructure of an application, but it’s sometimes unclear to developers when to use MongoDB alongside a relational database and what the best practices are. This presentation will introduce MongoDB, make the case for hybrid applications, and outline several real-world examples of such applications.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Data
Integrating Apache Cassandra with test-driven Development
Nate McCall (Apigee)
Integrating a distributed database with standard test-driven development techniques can be next to impossible, especially the breadth and complexity of failure scenarios that need to be created. This Session, led by Nate McCall of DataStax, will show attendees how to make the best of the open source utilities and projects available for integrating Apache Cassandra with your testing environment.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Java & JVM
The Java EE 7 Platform: Developing for the Cloud
Arun Gupta (Oracle)
This talk introduces the Java EE 7 platform, the latest revision of the Java platform for the enterprise.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Java & JVM
Exploring Java 8 Technology
Martijn Verburg (jClarity) et al
The speakers recently stumbled across a time machine containing a system built in Java 8 technology which has fallen back in time. This talk will explain some of the advanced features and future code archeology of this amazing find!
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Java & JVM
Above the Clouds: Introducing Akka
Jonas Bonér (Typesafe)
This talk introduces the Akka platform. Akka is the platform for the next generation of event-driven, scalable and fault-tolerant architectures on the JVM.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Java & JVM
Lightweight Web Apps with Ratpack
Tim Berglund (GitHub)
Ratpack is a Groovy-based web framework inspired by Sinatra. This talk is an overview of Ratpack development paradigms, build idioms, and deployment options.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Java & JVM
Concurrent Programming Using The Disruptor
Trisha Gee (MongoDB)
The Disruptor is an open source concurrency framework developed by LMAX, a London financial exchange. While it’s fashionable to use languages to hide away multithreading, the Disruptor does the opposite - enables developers to parallelize their architecture easily. In this session, Trisha Gee will show how to use the Disruptor, proving that concurrent programming doesn't have to be complicated.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Java & JVM
Aparapi: An Open Source tool for extending the Java promise of ‘Write Once Run Anywhere’ to include the GPU
Gary Frost (AMD)
Aparapi provides an API for expressing data parallel workloads in Java and a runtime capable of converting Java bytecode into OpenCL for execution on a GPU. For some data-parallel algorithms, executing on the GPU can offer substantial performance gains. We will introduce Aparapi, demonstrate key features as well as discuss lessons learned during the transition from closed to open-source.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Python
Python 3: the Next Generation (is here already)
wesley chun (Google)
An update from last year's well-received public service talk, we'll discuss the evolution of Python & answer common FAQs. There are those who worry that Python 3 is backwards-incompatible to Python 2. We address that issue, discuss what the main differences are, mention migration, the roles of 2.6/2.7 & other transition tools, and conclude with an update on what has been & yet needs to be ported.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Python
Writing a Django e-Commerce Framework
David Winterbottom (Tangent Labs)
This talk details the challenges, frustations, horror and ultimately joy, of writing an open-source e-commerce framework in Django.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Python
Permission or Forgiveness?
Alex Martelli (Google) et al
Grace Murray Hopper's famous motto, "It's easier to ask forgiveness than permission", has many useful applications -- in Python, in concurrency, in networking, as well of course as in real life. However, it's not universally valid. This talk explores both useful and damaging applications of this principle.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Python
Using Python to Solve Computationally Hard Problems
Rachael Madsen (Optimal Design Software LLC)
The Traveling Salesman Problem is a classic example of an NP-Complete task that is much more difficult than it seems on the surface. There are a number of algorithms available for solving it. In this session, we will look at different options for implementing complex mathematics within Python. We will evaluate the different options in relation to the specific algorithms used.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Python
Bootstrapping Django with Ease
Mike Biglan (Twenty Ideas) et al
The underlying bootstrapping (i.e. "startproject") and environmental setup process in Django has remained mostly unchanged for many years. Djenesis decouples bootstrapping from Django while allowing a user to choose their template or setup an existing project. Just as important, it also sets beginners up with a smoother learning-curve and simplifies environmental setup.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Python
Moving from Apps to Services
Craig Kerstiens (Heroku)
Django's unique app structure enables developers to break their application into functional units from the start of a project. The next step is to move from many Django apps in a single project to many services that talk across defined contracts and API's. We'll walk through practices for doing this and how Django enables it easily, but also the places it introduces complexities.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Perl
Perl 5: Today, Tomorrow, and Christmas
Ricardo Signes (Pobox.com)
In this session, Ricardo Signes (rjbs), the Perl 5 project lead, will discuss the future of the Perl language, the guiding principles of its ongoing design, and the specific changes toward which the Perl 5 Porters are working. It will also describe the way Perl 5 development really happens, how that is changing, and what we might want it to become.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Perl
Programming in the Future
Eric Wilhelm (Cisco, Inc.)
How does programming change and what will it be like in 25 years when you take your flying car to the office? Do the past 25 years of Perl give us enough perspective to see 25 years into the future? We'll look at recent progress, new features, and see how you can use a deeper knowledge of the inner workings to revolutionize your approach solving problems today.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Perl
Profiling memory usage of Perl applications
Tim Bunce (TigerLead)
Why is my process using that much memory? Is there a memory leak, and if so where is it? In this talk I'll show you how to find answers to these questions and more.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Perl
Introduction to Git for the Perl Hacker
Mark Allen (Mark Allen)
For many Perl programmers, using git is a bit of a black box. This talk hopes to bring some clarity around the rather unintuitive interface of the git distributed version control system. The talk is geared for git beginners, primarily, although some of the content may be interesting to people who are comfortable with the basic git workflow of "add, commit, push."
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Tools and Techniques
The O'Reilly Author Experience
Matt Neuburg (TidBITS)
The process of writing, editing, and publishing an O'Reilly programming book has been tending increasingly into the open source domain, relying on open source tools and technologies. This talk describes one author's experience, along with considerations about the possible future of the book in an increasingly open source world.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Perl
The Conway Channel
Damian Conway (Thoughtstream)
Who knows what evil lurks in the heart of Perl? The Damian knows!
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Programming
The Path to Go 1
Andrew Gerrand (Google) et al
Go 1 is a stable version of the Go Programming Language that will be supported for years to come. In this talk, Rob Pike and Andrew Gerrand outline the major highlights of the release and discuss the details behind some specific libraries and tools. They show that Go is not just a language, but a cohesive programming environment for producing high quality software.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Programming
C++11 as a new language
Thiago Macieira (Intel)
The past 15 years have seen many languages be created to solve problems that languages before it couldn't solve or had not solved properly. In 2011, our old and familiar C and C++ languages received an upgrade: C11 and C++11. The changes to C++11 are so important it is almost a new language. This talk will present some of the most interesting changes aimed at making a developer's life easier.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Programming
Effective Code Review
Dan Menard (Netflix)
Why don't more companies practice code review? We all know how beneficial it is, and we've all seen it's successes in open source. What's so hard about bringing it over to the world of commercial software development? Nothing! This is a success story about adopting code review from the open source community and applying it to commercial development. It worked for us. It can work for you too.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Programming
Modern Software Development Anti-patterns
Martijn Verburg (jClarity) et al
Following on from a popular OSCON 2011 Ignite talk, the Diabolical Developer and Ben Evans (the voice of reason) returns with a full length presentation full of controversy and thought provoking material. In short, this session provides a wealth of tips and tricks to free you from the chains of so call 'modern software development best practices'.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Programming
Designing Hypermedia APIs
Steve Klabnik (Jumpstart Lab)
In this talk, Steve will explain how to design your APIs so that they truly embrace the web and HTTP. Just as there's an impedance mismatch between our databases, our ORMs, and our models, there's an equal mismatch between our applications, our APIs, and our clients. Pros and cons of this approach will be discussed, as well as why more people aren't building APIs this way yet.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Programming
What Makes a Great Open API?
John Musser (ProgrammableWeb)
If open APIs and open data are the new open source, then what makes a good API into a great API? This session is a deep-dive on helping you build better APIs. And designing an open API is a lot harder than it looks: protocols, data formats, optimizations, security, abstractions, and more. This session draws on our experience at ProgrammableWeb where we've looked at over 5,000 different open APIs.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Community
Harnessing the Good Intentions of Others for your OSS Project
Llewellyn Falco (Spun Labs) et al
We have had a history of taking a different approach that has been highly successful in turning small emails and twitter comments into people programming with us on our OSS projects. In this session we will share our stories so that you can also the harness good intentions of others and turn those intentions into committable code.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Community
Open Source Community Growth as a User Experience Problem
Asheesh Laroia (Eventbrite) et al
In your open source project's community, some people contribute. Most people don't. By analyzing the typical open source project's on-ramp for new contributors through the lens of user experience design, we provide practical tips to make any project more approachable and that diversify the community.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Community
Open Source 2.0: The Science of Community Management
David Eaves (Eaves Consulting)
What do data analytics and negotiation theory have in common? In this talk, community management adviser David Eaves will outline how these two disciplines form the core of a new Science of Community Management: an approach to measure and manage contributors to make participation less frustration and more productive.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Community
Scaling Your Community by Nurturing Leaders
Meghan Gill (10gen)
In this session, we’ll talk about strategies for nurturing, empowering and rewarding community leaders to help scale your open source community.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
Mind Over Machine--How-To Make Your Own Mind-Controlled Robot
Mary Jane Kelly (Casaba Security)
Long have people dreamed of finding psychokinetic powers. From ancient mythology to the Uncanny X-Men, mental superpowers have been the stuff of legend. Now, with an Arduino and an EEG sensor headset, the amazing power of telekinesis can be yours!
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Geek Lifestyle
Open Source tools for local history
Brian Capouch (Saint Josephs College)
Pastfinder is a prototype system developed by the software engineering class at Saint Joseph's College to keep track of a wide variety of geolocated historical assets. Based on Open Source tools, it was used to develop an online "virtual cemetery" which represents Independence Cemetery, a large pioneer graveyard in Jasper County, Indiana.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) PHP
PHP in 2012
Rasmus Lerdorf (Etsy)
A look at the state of PHP in 2012 and how it fits into the current technology stack. The session will cover common mistakes and a detailed review of new PHP 5.4 features.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) PHP
PHP 5.4 Features You Will Actually Use
Lorna Jane Mitchell (LornaJane)
Did you know that the newest version of PHP ships with its own development server? This talk discusses when this might be useful (and when it isn't!) and also covers a selection of the other features new in PHP.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) PHP
I Can't Believe You Still Do It That Way:12 Years of PHP Best Practice Talks revisited
Laura Thomson (Mozilla Corporation) et al
For the last twelve years we've been giving conference talks and writing books about how to develop for the web in PHP. Over that time we've made a bunch of recommendations: some still hold true, and some things have changed quite a bit since 2000. We'll talk about how the landscape's changed, and how and when you should change the way you work.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) PHP
Developing easily deployable PHP Applications
John Mertic (SugarCRM)
Here's the scenario: you wrote a PHP application that is designed to run on Linux, Apache, and MySQL. Now you have a customer that wants to run it on Windows. Or using Oracle. Or they like using Memcache instead of APC. How do you do it, without sacrificing performance, stability, simplicity, and your own sanity? learn what it takes to make that project a success.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) PHP
Get Some Rest: Best RESTful API Practices
Lorna Jane Mitchell (LornaJane)
Whether you're consumer or provider, getting the API right is a puzzle. This session gives the best practices for making this relationship easier all round, with clear PHP-based examples and a few war stories to go with them.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) PHP
Dependency Injection with PHP
Bastian Hofmann (ResearchGate GmbH)
Dependency Inversion is an important technique of object oriented software design and one of Uncle Bob's S.O.L.I.D. principles. In this talk I'll show you what this means and how modern PHP dependency injection containers can help you massively. I will especially highlight rg\injection, a new, fetaure rich container inspired by google-guice.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Business
Living with Open Source Software
Brian Olore (The Boeing Company) et al
Why do you decide to use Open Source Software? How do you choose one Open Source project over another? Join us for a discussion of the critical factors to consider to "mitigate risk" when choosing to use a project, including techniques for living with that choice. We'll talk about several different projects that we have integrated to various ends: success, forking, adoption, and abandonment.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Business
The Ten Commandments of Open Innovation
Thierry Carrez (OpenStack)
As open source becomes ubiquitous, open innovation becomes the new frontier. How do we create truly collaborative multi-company open source projects, and how do we make them successful ? This talk will reflect back on the good and the bad of the OpenStack project experience to distill ten principles that anyone should apply to their own open innovation projects.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Business
‘Open Movie’ 3D Animation and the Business of Free Culture
Bassam Kurdali (URCHN)
Artist, programmer, entrepreneur and activist Bassam Kurdali on the non-traditional URCHN.ORG animation studio, the Tube Open Movie, F/LOSS for independent filmmaking, art work and doing business in the commons.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Business
Hiding Data Kills Innovation
Gil Elbaz (Factual)
Hiding data in a siilo no longer needs to be the status quo. Indeed, this presentation argues that it shouldn’t be. In this presentation, Gil Elbaz will discuss the detriments of hiding data and the relationship between data accessibility and innovation.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Business
How The App Store Killed Free Software, And Why We're OK With That
Robert "r0ml" Lefkowitz (Sharewave)
Software Freedom™ doesn't come from access to the source code any more than Freedom of the Press comes from the ability to take apart the machines that print the newspaper. The App Store has changed the software industry to create software freedom without access to source code.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Business
It’s not our code, but it is our product! Managing the security impact of bundled Open Source Software
Tim Sammut (Cisco Security Research and Operations)
The use of Open Source Software in products or services can create numerous benefits; however, it simultaneously presents security challenges that are often overlooked. How do you learn of new vulnerabilities in OSS that you use? How do you effectively manage and track those issues? How do you disclose issues to your customers? This session will address these questions and many more.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Cloud
Comparing Open Source Private Cloud Platforms
Lance Albertson (Oregon State University Open Source Lab)
Private cloud computing has become an integral part of global business. While each platform provides a way for virtual machines to be deployed, implementations vary widely. It can be difficult to determine which features are right for your needs. This session will discuss the top open source private cloud platforms and provide analysis on which one is the best fit for you.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Cloud
Highly Available Cloud: OpenStack integration with Pacemaker
Florian Haas (hastexo)
An introduction to high availability for the OpenStack cloud stack, using the Pacemaker cluster management framework.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Cloud
Apache HTTPD 2.4.0: Watch out cloud!
Jim Jagielski (ASF)
With its latest release (2.4.0), Apache httpd is ideally suited for the cloud, both in performance and capability. See what enhancements have been made so that you can also take advantage of Apache 2.4.0.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Cloud
Apache ZooKeeper in Action
Mahadev Konar (Hortonworks)
This talk will include a review of the breadth of ZooKeeper features and use cases in low latency systems like ad platforms, high latency WAN environment and high throughput deployments. The talk will also include the future roadmap for ZooKeeper.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Ops
One-man ops; deploying at scale in EC2 while letting you sleep through the night
Jos Boumans (Krux Digital)
Using the AWS infrastructure, affordable third party services and solid Open Source Software, this talk will focus on setting up a solid operations environment and practice that will scale with your site.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Cloud
Programming with the OSS Cloud Stack
Mike Amundsen (Layer 7 Technologies)
The "cloud stack" development environment—one that lets you not just build cloud-based app for the web, but actually build them while on the Web—is a reality. Using open source, standardized software and management tools, it’s now possible to code, test, debug, and deploy web based solutions; all from a modern browser.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) UX
Open Sourcing User Experience Design
Jeff Gothelf (Proof)
Design is often perceived as “making things user-friendly.” To combat that oversimplification, designers shroud their work in specialized tools & jargon. This gives designers a false sense of value & control over their work. In actuality, this drives divisions between designers & their teams. By open sourcing design process via transparency, the true value of Design and designers becomes clear.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) UX
Consumer Science and Product Development at Netflix
Rochelle King (Netflix) et al
Netflix has created one of the most beloved and, at times, controversial consumer products of the last decade. Two veteran executives of the company, leaders of product design and product engineering,will give a detailed, behind-the-scenes look at how the experiment-oriented culture of Netflix drives product decisions.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Open Hardware
Arduino Hacking 101: Importing the Universe
Federico Lucifredi (Canonical | Ubuntu)
This session aims to give you the tools to import the real world into the programming scope of your trusty $30 microcontroller, by covering the technology fundamentals and integration essentials of a wide variety of sensors and actuators, as well as providing a few alternative power schemes and even mobility options to increase the variety of your design arsenal.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Open Hardware
Arduino & Handbag: Create Android Accessories Without Android Code
Philip Lindsay (rancidbacon.com)
The Android Open Accessory Protocol makes it possible for you to create custom Arduino-based accessories for your Android phone or tablet. Attend this session to learn how to get started, the hardware & software required and how the Handbag for Android project makes development easier.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Open Hardware
Hacking Together A Basic Remote Sensor With An Arduino, Xbee Radios, and Linux
Rob Reilly (Rob Reilly Consulting)
The hacker community has enthusiastically embraced the Arduino microcontroller. Linux and Open Source hackers are some of the most sophisticated and forward thinking in the business. This talk with give them plenty of ideas for building highly capable, remote sensor projects.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Open Hardware
Building a Home Automation Server
Bruce Momjian (EnterpriseDB)
There are more options for home automation than ever before --- a growing number of inputs and outputs can be harnessed to make your home life easier. This presentation ties shows how sensors, temperatures, wireless devices, and telephones can be tied into lights, sounds, and even coffee pots to make your home "smart".
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Healthcare
BodyTrack: Open Source Tools for Health Empowerment through Self-Tracking
Anne Wright (CMU) et al
The BodyTrack project develops open source tools to aggregate and visualize self-tracking data from a variety of sources. We seek to empower individuals to explore how various factors affect them, such as evaluating potential food sensitivities, asthma or migraine triggers, or other environment/health interactions. We will discuss these tools and experiences using them.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Healthcare
Hacking Yourself: Hard Core Behavior Change
Fred Trotter (FredTrotter.com)
I run the public running behaviour change site RunOrElse.com. The idea is simple. You set a distance goal each week. You track that goal with RunKeeper. If you meet your goal, nothing happens and you keep your money. If you fail your goal, we automatically charge your Paypal account, sending money to charity. During this talk we will release and demo Open Source code that does the same thing!
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Healthcare
Experience Sampling Experience
Bob Evans (Google)
Get started building your own Android health trackers in minutes with PACO. PACO is an opensource Android tool that lets you create all sorts of experience sampling studies to track health & wellness as well as visualize all the data together across your experiments. It started out inside Google but is now being used by Quantified Self-ers, med schools, psychology departments, & businesses.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Healthcare
Building safety-critical medical device platforms and Meaningful Use EHR gateways
Shahid Shah (Netspective)
Medical devices can no longer be seen as standalone components because of the significant clinical data they collect. Creating connected devices is a major requirement for most manufacturers and this talk with show how to use modern, open source and open software architecture techniques to build connected devices.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Perl, Programming
Don't Fear Unicode
Jacinta Richardson (Perl Training Australia)
Unicode isn't new, but it still seems hard when you're starting at the beginning and haven't even been told the difference between a glyph, a codepoint, a character and a byte. Every year there are talks and tutorials at conferences about it, but if you haven't grasped the basics, you can feel frustrated and lost much too quickly. Fear not! It's about to get easier.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Healthcare
Global communities building open source Health IT platforms: The OpenMRS experience
Paul Biondich (OpenMRS) et al
What are the advantages and disadvantages of building Health IT platforms instead of out-of-the box systems? How can people building these systems share tools and resources with others in different countries who may do very different work? This panel of participants in the OpenMRS community will share their real-world experiences from multiple continents on a variety of scales.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Tools and Techniques
Scaling to 100+ APIs
Joe Gregorio (Google)
So you've shipped an API. But what if you had to ship over 100 APIs? Come hear the lessons Google learned, and the unique challenges we faced, as we scaled our system for developing and serving APIs from a handful to over 100.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Tools and Techniques
Open Data and Visualization in Smallest Federated Wiki
Ward Cunningham (Cunningham & Cunningham, Inc.)
Federation lets you have your data and share it too. Learn how you can use this new wiki to provide or consume open data in an environment architected to make this safe and easy.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m)
Session
To be confirmed
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Tools and Techniques
The Secret Diaries of a Performance Tuning Superhero
Steve Burton (AppDynamics)
As applications become more distributed, virtual and elastic, many organizations are losing their grip on application performance and scalability. This session will use customer case studies to look at the biggest performance bottlenecks of the past year, as well as best practices around finding and troubleshooting them.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Tools and Techniques
Faster! Faster! Accelerate your business with blazing prototypes
Drew Engelson (Celerity)
Bring your ideas to life! Convince your boss to that open source development is faster and cheaper than the "safe" COTS solution they probably hate anyway. Let's investigate ways to get real-life, functional prototypes up with blazing speed. We'll look at and compare tools for truly rapid development including Python, Django, Flask, PHP, Amazon EC2 and Heroku.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m)
Session
To be confirmed
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Mobile
Concurrent Programming for Mobile Application: Is Android Up To The Challenge?
G. Blake Meike (Open Mobile World Wide)
The mobile platform adds new challenges to concurrent programming making it much more like what used to be called "real time programming". The Android OS addresses these challenges with three frameworks: a managed application lifecycle, the Looper class, and the AsyncTask template. But is it enough?
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Mobile
Remixing Android
Marko Gargenta (Twitter)
Learn how to take vanilla Android, rip it open, remix it, and build a new image that can run on your device on choice. In this talk, we'll explore the black magic of Android internals. You will learn how to reconfigure the build system by adding our applications, services, daemons, or libraries. By the end of this talk, you should have basic understanding of creating a custom ROM.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Mobile
Android Security Essentials
Pragati Ogal Rai (PayPal, eBay Inc.)
Android is the leading mobile operating system. With its growing popularity and adoption, it is important to understand the security architecture of Android so developers can secure their data and also protect the privacy and confidentiality of their users. This session discusses the overall Android security architecture and talks about different security artifacts provided by Android.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Mobile
Speech Enabling Android Applications
Simon MacDonald (IBM) et al
Learn about the android.speech package and enable Speech Recognition and Text to Speech functionality in your Android apps today. This presentation will give a brief overview of the basics and best practices of Speech Recognition. Then we will quickly put together an application using Speech Recognition for input and TTS for output that can answer almost any question you put to it. 
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Mobile
MongoDB Geospatial and Android
Paul Scott (DSTV Online) et al
Build a MongoDB geospatial datastore using Creative Commons licensed world data and an Android client to consume the service for fun and profit!
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Mobile
Building a Mobile, Offline Mapping Stack Using Open Tools & Data
Justin Miller (Mapbox)
This presentation will focus on a process for taking open data sources, turning them into beautiful custom maps, using them on mobile in an offline-capable way, and doing it all with entirely open source code.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Education
The Shared Learning Collaborative
Sharren Bates (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation)
The Shared Learning Collaborative (SLC) is building a set of shared technology services that will allow states and school districts to connect student data and education materials that currently exist in different formats and locations. Learn about the developing technology, including the technical specifications, data store, APIs and SDK, and address participant questions.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Education
How The Tools And Philosophies Of Open Source Will Save Education In The 21st Century
Kurt Bollacker (Applied Minds)
Our current public education system was built using industrial age thinking, and is now struggling to adapt to modern educational needs. Open Source philosophies have given us an information age of prosperity. Recent developments mean we can finally use "open source thinking" to transform our educational system into a 21st century success- but it won't look much like it does today.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Education
Open Education Analytics Infrastructure: How we enable the next 10 years.
Greg Grossmeier (Creative Commons) et al
We've done it. We've created a ton of high quality OER. But how can that material enable a personalized learning environment? How do students find the best material for their unique needs and desires? The Learning Registry coupled with the new LRMI metadata standard provide that infrastructure. Come learn how you can improve your own learning platforms, or write the next generation.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Education
Big Little Boolean: The FERPA Restriction and You
Michael Brewer (UGA: Franklin College OIT)
One of the many parts of the FERPA law is the ability of students to put a restriction on the release of their academic information. While this sounds simple enough, there are many powerful (and sometimes unforeseen) consequences of choosing the Restriction. In this session, we will discuss why you should add the field to your student records, why students opt in, and what side effects can happen.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Education
Backyard Brains: Improving neuroscience education through open-source lessons and technology
Nathan Dotz (Detroit Labs)
We are bringing a previously unrepresented field, neuroscience, to K12 education with an unheard of method: we are open-sourcing everything. You'll learn how building upon open source technologies and using open licensing on our creations lets us do what no one else has -- bring neuroscience to primary education classrooms around the world!
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Education
Designing Systems for Fluid Teacher Adoption
Jonathan Briggs (Eastside Preparatory School)
Take a tour of 8 years of lessons learned building, assembling, purchasing and adapting an optimal online learning ecosystem at a forward thinking 5-12 independent school. Find out how to get rapid teacher adoption, maximize resources and influence instructional practices. We will also take a tour of how Eastside Prep's integrated systems support all levels of the school.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored Sessions
A Deeper Look at the Enyo JavaScript Framework
Dave Freeman (Hewlett Packard)
In this session, we will explore the ideas behind the Enyo framework, a new JavaScript framework that takes the ideas of encapsulation and reusable code objects into the web application and mobile worlds. We will also explore the ecosystem of new libraries build on the Enyo core, especially the Onyx user-interface system which was designed to be beautiful and usable across multiple platforms.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Open Source in the Enterprise: Billing and Payment Processing Systems
Jason Hall (Bluehost)
In this talk, Jason Hall will discuss the problems that every developer misses, why your finance gets frustrated, and the marketing team cries about your existing billing code. He will also show you how to avoid problems by utilizing existing open source billing toolkits like Freeside as the base of your billing and payments system.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Designing for DevOps: Building Ops at New Relic
Chris Kelly (New Relic)
If you can build a DevOps team from the ground up, what would it look like? How do you hire for DevOps? What tools do you use? What about culture and process? We'll share our experiences from building an operations team designed for DevOps.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Alfresco: An Open Source Platform for Content Management, On-Premise or in the Cloud
Jeff Potts (Alfresco Software)
Find out how Java-based Alfresco, a rich content repository that is open source and fully standards compliant, can be a building block in your architecture for content-heavy solutions. We'll explore different patterns of implementation in order to get you started on your next project. Includes live demos and code snippets.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Building Functional Hybrid Apps For The iPhone And Android
Carlos Andreu (IBM) et al
Watch as we show you how to rapidly build a functional hybrid mobile app starting from conception to a working application for iOS and Android devices – with time left over to discuss various deployment challenges to developing hybrid applications.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Logging as Event Streams
Brandon Philips (Rackspace, Inc)
Logging infrastructures have traditionally been centered around building human readable logging, but as systems have grown, the volume of log data is impractical for a human to consume.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Why The Sequel To NoSQL Is SQL
Ori Herrnstadt (FoundationDB)
If you are thinking of implementing noSQL because you have no alternative, we’ll show you how to drop Akiban Server into your existing application & solve problematic SQL queries w/o investing in an entirely new approach to storing data. Your applications operate on Objects - we will demonstrate how much performance can be gained when you remove the SQL impedance mismatch with the Akiban Server.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Life After Sharding: Monitoring and Managing a Complex Data Cloud
Boris Livshutz (Appdynamics)
Data systems have struggled to keep up with the rapid growth of application data. As a result, many have turned to sharding their data as a solution. These new complex systems or "data clouds" present a new array of challenges. In this session we'll discuss best practices around monitoring and managing your data cloud.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
How to Write Compilers and Optimizers (and solve Data Transformation Problems)
Shevek . (Nebula)
Compilers don't just turn C into binary, they transform data, and the optimizer is a critical decision-maker in the process. If we understand both, we can often solve tedious data transformation, scheduling or logic problems with very little effort. This presentation will teach you the magic, and convey a wealth of experience. Attendees have been known to subsequently write compilers.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Massively Scalable NoSQL with Apache Cassandra
Jonathan Ellis (DataStax, Inc)
This session will explain how Apache Cassandra meets OLTP big data needs, and its relationship with big data analytics. Jonathan will explain why Cassandra is the leading big data OLTP solution and how Cassandra delivers linear scale-out capabilities with true high availability, with examples from real-world production use cases.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
The HipHop Virtual Machine: PHP Execution At The Speed Of JIT
Jason Evans (Facebook)
The HipHop Virtual Machine (hhvm) is a mostly compatible PHP implementation that Facebook is actively developing.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Running MongoDB for High Availability
Greg Brockman (Stripe)
Applications are only as reliable as the database they use. At Stripe, we've developed a set of practical techniques for running MongoDB without downtime even in the face of catastophic machine failure. This session will cover a range of these techniques (and the tales behind their development).
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Open Innovation on Demand
John Igoe (Dell) et al
Open source software is not just fueling innovation, but leading it, according to a recent 451 Group survey. It's leading innovation in cloud and big data, as well as creating innovative business models such as Open SaaS. In this session, John Igoe, executive director of Dell's open source Cloud and Big Data Solutions, will talk about this exciting new era of open innovation on demand.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Sponsored Sessions
Taking the Guesswork Out of Implementing Hadoop
Audrey Ng (Hewlett-Packard) et al
Apache Hadoop is clearly one of the fastest growing big data platforms used by enterprises to store and analyze arbitrarily structured data in search of business insights. However, Hadoop systems are challenging to configure, manage and scale, and Hadoop expertise is hard to find.
10:00am-5:40pm (7h 40m)
Wednesday Expo Hall Activities
From products, projects, and parties to snacks, swag, and speakers, the 2012 OSCON Expo Hall will be the place to gather outside of sessions on Wednesday and Thursday. Test drive new tools, compare products, meet with nonprofit volunteers, say hello to speakers and authors, get your Make on, hang out in the lounge, and much more.
5:40pm-7:00pm (1h 20m) Event
Booth Crawl
Quench your thirst with vendor-hosted libations and snacks while you check out all the cool stuff in the expo hall.
8:45am-8:50am (5m) Keynote
Opening Welcome
Edd Dumbill (Silicon Valley Data Science) et al
Opening remarks by Portland Mayor Sam Adams, as well as OSCON program chairs, Sarah Novotny and Edd Dumbill.
8:50am-9:05am (15m) Keynote
The Science of Open Source Community Management
David Eaves (Eaves Consulting)
An open source community depends on its capacity to attract people and the efficiency with which it can harness their energy to create great software. While a compelling mission or killer product can be helpful, effective communities must be responsive and efficient in managing the diverse needs and demands of its members.
9:05am-9:20am (15m) Keynote
The Learning Map
Danny Hillis (Applied Minds, LLC)
Applied Minds CEO, Danny Hillis will offer an introduction to The Learning Map, a Shared Learning Collaborative initiative organizing online learning material to get the right content to the right student at the right time.
9:20am-9:35am (15m) Keynote
The Mudslide Hypothesis of Science
Kaitlin Thaney (Digital Science)
The Web has transformed not only the way we approach modern day science, but a number of other facets of the research cycle: tools for analysis, mediums which now serve as “information inputs”, how we exchange ideas and even discover knowledge. Yet despite the pieces being there, changing practice is like trying to shake a castle.
9:35am-9:50am (15m) Keynote
Scaling OpenStack Technology. Lessons From The Field
Brian Aker (HP)
In this keynote, Brian Aker, HP Fellow, will share challenges and best practices from his work with OpenStack software, including how a rich set of APIs must be developed in order to drive broad platform adoption as well as the need for formal APIs.
9:50am-10:10am (20m) Keynote
The Clothesline Paradox and the Sharing Economy
Tim O'Reilly (O'Reilly Media, Inc.)
Open source software was one of the earliest successful examples of a sharing economy that has had huge economic impact. But as alternative energy advocate Steve Baer once noted, ecosystem services are often ignored in economic analysis: when you put your clothes in the dryer the energy you use is measured and counted, but when you hang them on the line, they disappear from the measured economy.
10:10am-10:40am (30m)
Break: Morning Break
3:10pm-4:10pm (1h)
Break: Afternoon Break - Sponsored by DataStax
12:10pm-1:40pm (1h 30m)
Break: Lunch - Sponsored by Google
<div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 7:00pm-9:00pm (2h) Event </div> <div class="en_popup_name">Braintree Party</div> <div class="en_popup_desc">We love being at OSCON. And we want to celebrate. So drinks are in order. Because celebration is conducive to meeting interesting people and sharing ideas. Stop by the Tap Room in MacTarnahan Bar. We&#x27;ll be there from 7-9 and we&#x27;ll grab you a beer. It&#x27;s free. It&#x27;s interesting. It&#x27;s delicious.</div> </div> <div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 7:00pm-11:00pm (4h) </div> <div class="en_popup_name">Wednesday Birds of a Feather Sessions (BoFs)</div> <div class="en_popup_desc">Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions provide face to face exposure to those interested in the same projects and concepts. BoFs can be organized for individual projects or broader topics (best practices, open data, standards). BoFs are entirely up to you. We post your topic and provide the space and time. You provide the engaging topic. </div> </div> <div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 9:00pm-11:00pm (2h) Event </div> <div class="en_popup_name">OpenStack Party</div> <div class="en_popup_desc">Please join us to celebrate the OpenStack community&#x27;s success on its 2nd anniversary during OSCON 2012! We will have food, drinks, bar games and of course, OpenStack limited-edition t-shirts! </div> </div>

Sponsors

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the conference, contact Sharon Cordesse at (707) 827-7065 or scordesse@oreilly.com.

View a complete list of OSCON contacts