Sponsors

  • Microsoft
  • Nebula
  • Google
  • SugarCRM
  • Facebook
  • HP
  • Intel
  • Rackspace Hosting
  • WSO2
  • Alfresco
  • BlackBerry
  • CUBRID
  • Dell
  • eBay
  • Heroku
  • InfiniteGraph
  • JBoss
  • LeaseWeb
  • Liferay
  • Media Temple, Inc.
  • OpenShift
  • Oracle
  • Percona
  • Puppet Labs
  • Qualcomm Innovation Center, Inc.
  • Rentrak
  • Silicon Mechanics
  • SoftLayer Technologies, Inc.
  • SourceGear
  • Urban Airship
  • Vertica
  • VMware
  • (mt) Media Temple, Inc.

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the convention, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com

Download the OSCON Sponsor/Exhibitor Prospectus

Contact Us

View a complete list of OSCON contacts

If Hacker News had a conference, it would be OSCON. Join with fellow programmers on a continual odyssey of honing your skills and finding new ways to think.

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Location: Portland 252
Tags: python, tdd, handson
Matt Harrison (MetaSnake)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 10 ratings)
Python is used all over the place and gaining in popularity. This introduction to Python assumes you know how to program, but don't know Python. You'll learn the basics, write some code and hopefully leave being able to grok Python. Read more.
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Location: Portland 256
Dean Wampler (Typesafe)
Average rating: ***..
(3.31, 13 ratings)
You've heard that Functional programming (FP) is good for concurrency. Mastering FP will improve all the code you write. FP changes practices like TDD; learn how design is more structured and tests are more precise. See why FP-style functions and data structures are actually more reusable than objects. Leave with new tools that eliminate bloat, improve code quality, and speed development. Read more.
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Location: D137/138
Andrew Gerrand (Google)
Average rating: ****.
(4.30, 10 ratings)
Go is a new, concurrent, garbage-collected programming language that aims to combine the speed and safety of a static language like C with the flexibility and agility of a dynamic language like Python or JavaScript. This hands-on tutorial will cover the essentials of Go, ranging from its basic syntax through to its type system and concurrency primitives. It is a huge amount of fun! Read more.
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Location: Portland 252
Tags: developer, vim
Damian Conway (Thoughtstream)
Average rating: ****.
(4.96, 25 ratings)
You use your editor all day, every day. But how much of that editor do you actually use? This tutorial explores many of the less widely known but more powerful features of the Vim editor, and explains how developers can greatly improve their productivity by optimizing, automating, or even eliminating the common coding tasks they perform every day. Read more.
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Location: D137/138
Francesco Cesarini (Erlang Solutions Ltd)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 2 ratings)
Erlang can be used to build fault tolerant systems with a fraction of the effort needed when using conventional languages. The trick is avoiding defensive programming while focusing on the correct case. This hands-on tutorial will go through the Erlang constructs and libraries that provide the building blocks used to develop reliable systems that never fail. Read more.
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Location: Portland 255
Rob Pike (Google, Inc.)
Average rating: ****.
(4.06, 18 ratings)
The Go programming language was designed to make programming productive and efficient. Go is a concurrent language that compiles quickly to machine code yet has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. This talk is an introduction to Go that focuses on how the design of the language helps it achieves those goals. Read more.
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Location: Portland 255
Brian Fitzpatrick (Google, Inc.), Ben Collins-Sussman (Google, Inc.)
Average rating: ***..
(3.64, 14 ratings)
Are languages, compilers, debuggers, and algorithms all you need to be a successful software engineer? In a perfect world, those who produce the best code should be the most successful. Unfortunately, we live in a world of imperfect people, and collaborating with others is at least as important as having great technical skills if you want to write great software. Read more.
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Location: Portland 255
Richard Hipp (SQLite.org)
Average rating: ***..
(3.93, 14 ratings)
Geeks hate paperwork and protocol, which presents a challenge to anyone trying to organize a quality-control system for an open-source software project. This talk describes and demonstrates how simple, unintrusive checklists that can reduce development time and improve software quality without provoking a mutiny. Read more.
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Location: E145
Average rating: ****.
(4.69, 13 ratings)
In "topics we're looking for", the call for papers has the phrase "open, open, open". And the word "open" appears eleven times. The word "source" appears thrice. This talk is about "source, source, source." It is the intelligibility, the accessibility, the understandability of the *source* code and data which creates community and collaboration. Presenting source patterns and anti-patterns. Read more.
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Location: Portland 255
Paul Jones (http://paul-m-jones.com/)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 3 ratings)
This talk examines the importance of careful benchmarking and how it can help with predicting resource usage. Read more.
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Location: Portland 255
Bryan Call (Yahoo!)
Average rating: ***..
(3.71, 7 ratings)
Techniques and tools to used to profile software applications. Examples and usage of OProfile, Google Profiler, Valgrind's Callgrind, and strace, geared towards profiling C/C++ applications. People should come away with the knowledge of what tools are available and how to diagnose performance issues in software. Read more.
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Location: Portland 255
Mike Amundsen (API Academy, CA Technologies)
Average rating: ***..
(3.33, 15 ratings)
One of the key properties of RESTful Web applications is the ability to evolve over time. Too many Web APIs don’t evolve; they just get old, and useless; they rot. Why? Because they are little more than URI-based RPC calls returning serialized objects. Instead, Web APIs should rely on well-crafted media-type messages driven by links; they should be more RESTful. Read more.
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Location: Portland 255
Roger Bodamer (10gen), Peter Neubauer (Neo Technology), Matt Pfeil (DataStax), Tim Anglade (Apigee), Antony Falco (Basho Technologies)
Average rating: *....
(1.75, 16 ratings)
This panel discussion features the key innovators in the NoSQL space. Read more.
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Location: Portland 255
Piers Cawley (Thermeon)
Average rating: ***..
(3.29, 24 ratings)
Languages with first class functions are different. Callbacks and `each' are just the start - the fun really begins when you start learning from the Lisp guys and writing code that writes code that writes code. Think differently about your Javascript and do more with less code Read more.
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Location: Portland 255
Alex Martelli (Google)
Average rating: ***..
(3.08, 26 ratings)
Designing interfaces so that other code can interact with ours (whether our code is a library, framework, application, website...) is a very common and clearly crucial activity, but fraught with dangers — stuff we all keep doing wrong time after time. This talks shows some common cases of API design errors encountered in the wild, with tips on how to avoid them when you design your next API. Read more.
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Location: Portland 255
Jeremiah Peschka (Brent Ozar PLF)
Average rating: ***..
(3.27, 11 ratings)
Writing SQL is has very little in common with writing application code. Refactoring SQL has nothing in common with writing application code. Good object-oriented refactoring techniques frequently cause problems with SQL. This talk covers tried and true methods for refactoring SQL. Read more.
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Location: Portland 255
Average rating: ***..
(3.91, 11 ratings)
How does Unicode support across major platforms, including Java, Perl, Python, Ruby, and more, stack up? Who's doing the best job, and who's failing miserably? Is anyone doing a good job? Does anyone actually implement to standard, and to what extent? I'll compare the major platforms to separate the losers from the not-so-losers. Read more.
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Location: Portland 252
Laura Thomson (Mozilla Corporation)
Average rating: ****.
(4.19, 16 ratings)
Review worst practices for releasing software: how to destroy scope in a single meeting; "death sprints" (more agile than death marches); how to avoid testing; how to make your software impossible to configure; and finally, when pushing out a webapp release, how to make your ops team hate you. This tongue in cheek session will review things learned painfully and late at night. Read more.
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Location: Portland 252
Gleicon Moraes (7co.cc)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 6 ratings)
Sometimes there is a mix between performance and scalability, but they are different dimensions. Changing your code from blocking to non-blocking yields scalability at the cost of a complexity. In this talk I show how Python, Ruby and JS do that, the differences between their async toolkits and some basic building blocks for web and high load applications. Read more.