Sponsors

  • Microsoft
  • Nebula
  • Google
  • SugarCRM
  • Facebook
  • HP
  • Intel
  • Rackspace Hosting
  • WSO2
  • Alfresco
  • BlackBerry
  • CUBRID
  • Dell
  • eBay
  • Heroku
  • InfiniteGraph
  • JBoss
  • LeaseWeb
  • Liferay
  • Media Temple, Inc.
  • OpenShift
  • Oracle
  • Percona
  • Puppet Labs
  • Qualcomm Innovation Center, Inc.
  • Rentrak
  • Silicon Mechanics
  • SoftLayer Technologies, Inc.
  • SourceGear
  • Urban Airship
  • Vertica
  • VMware
  • (mt) Media Temple, Inc.

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the convention, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com

Download the OSCON Sponsor/Exhibitor Prospectus

Contact Us

View a complete list of OSCON contacts

Sessions tagged with 'android'

Marko Gargenta (Twitter)
Learn to develop an Android application from start to finish. In this hands-on tutorial, you will learn design principles and we provided code snippets to put together an Android application. By end of this tutorial, you will understand main building blocks for Android application development.
Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Christopher Neugebauer (chris.neugebauer.id.au)
Presentation: external link
Learn why Android is awesome, and how you can build useful apps for the world’s most popular tiny computer even if you hate the idea of a telephone. Find out why a good UI and well thought-through interaction design are not optional components for mobile hackers, and build an actual app in 3 hours in this hands-on, fast paced tutorial. For existing programmers of any language at any level.
John Hawley (Red Hat), Shawn Pearce (Google)
The Google Android platform has sky rocketed in popularity over the last few years, boasting uncounted devices and a vibrant development community. We aim to pull back the curtain on the behind the scenes infrastructure that supports this world wide development effort from Gerrit code review to the servers that push the source code.
Zigurd Mednieks (Surfaceable.com)
One theme of Programming Android is that Android is now client Java. Client Java is what every Java coder started with when they start learning Java, but then, when it gets down to working for a living, it's all server Java now. So you have millions of coders who are primed for a successful client Java, and many of them work in enterprise IT. How will Android impact the work of Java coders?
Joe Bowser (Adobe Systems)
A cautionary tale of all the documented and undocumented quirks involved with developing applications with web technologies on Android. This will cover the fundamentals, as well as the obscure facts about developing Android Web Applications in the real world.
Chris DiBona (Google, Inc.)
First done at OSCON 2010, we though this session was extremely useful in helping developers work better with Google technology and answer questions they might be baffled about. So, for 40 minutes, we'll be happy to answer nearly any question an engineer might have. Many Googlers covering everything from Android to search will be in attendance and ready to answer your questions.
Josh Long (Pivotal)
Today's users expect their applications and data to follow them beyond the web-browser as they go mobile, watch TV, and work with their local operating system environment. In this talk, Josh Long introduces common ways to build these applications and how Spring can help simplify things both on the server side and client side.
Java is a great language but it's not supported on all mobile platforms. This session will show you how to use the open source GWT Java->JavaScript compiler and the PhoneGap build tool to create great mobile applications in Java that run on virtually all smartphone OSes: including webOS, Android, and iOS. We will see how to get started, build a few apps, and adapt them to different screen sizes.
PhoneGap is an open source Mobile framework for developing native applications for multiple devices. The developer programs using standard, well known Web technologies but gets access to device features using JavaScript apis. Build the app with web technologies, wrap it in the PhoneGap framework for device access, deploy on iOS, Android, Blackberry and more! One application, many platforms!
Arno Puder (http://www.heise.de/)
In this presentation we demonstrate how an Android application can be cross-compiled to other smartphones such as the iPhone or Windows Phone 7. We will give a technical overview of the cross-compilation process based on the Open Source project XMLVM.
Avinash Agrawal (SETI Institute), Francis Potter (The Hathersage Group)
Most people have ideas on SETI; if only they had a chance, they would enhance the search. Wait no more. setiQuest gives you access to data, software that we just open-sourced after 20 years of being closed, and sophisticated front-end tools. Learn how you can help us improve the data and tools, or use them yourself to find ETI. If we succeed, this could be most profound scientific discovery ever.
Suzanne Alexandra (Motorola)
This session presents the best design and development tips for creating Android tablet applications that users love, using Android 3.0 or later.
Chris DiBona (Google, Inc.), Carol Smith (Google, Inc.)
In this talk we'll talk about the years events in open source at Google, including a breakdown of the Google code-in project and an update on the Summer of Code.
Sarah Sharp (Intel)
Open source folks are naturally lazy. Anything mundane task they can automate, they will. So what does an open source developer do when faced with planning, planting, and tediously watering a garden? Automate!
Josh Bloch (Google)
In my technical presentation, I'll be discussing all of the changes to the Java programming language since its inception. In this this keynote, I'll focus my attention on the starting point: I'll present my candidates for the best and worst features in the platform as it was originally released (JDK 1.0), and explain the reasoning behind my choices.
Kim Weins (OpenLogic)
Most mobile apps incorporate open source software, yet many of these apps may not be complying with open source licenses. The Free Software Foundation position is that iTunes and GPL are incompatible. This session will present research by OpenLogic on the use of open source software in mobile apps and the level of compliance with open source licenses.
Media organizations are using open source to stretch their budgets further. And as more content platforms continue to emerge, open source projects provide alternative modes of development. But what does this paradigm look like on the ground? The returns can be huge. But not everything is rose-colored. Through NPR's experiences with Android, Chrome, and more, we can chart some of these waters.
Manfred Moser (simpligility technologies inc.)
The Android SDK is open source and developed transparently. Although not well known, this is just the tip of the iceberg. There is a huge variety of development, test and build tools available. You can reuse some existing Java libraries and will find that more and more Android specific libraries are being created and used. Get a good overview and see what the future might bring.
Bryan Smith (Fossetcon)
Pandaboard is the Goliath of Open Hardware Embedded Platforms. A Dual-core Arm Cortex A9 processor aND 1GB of DDR2 RAM make it ideal for a myraid of use scenarios. Pandaboard touts an HDMI interface, Hardware accelerated 1080p HD video playback, 802.11n Wifi, Bluetooth, and USB OTG all on an Omap 4 platform. Have fun exploring this amazing Open Hardware platform up close and personal.
Deborah Wallach (Google), Eni Mustafaraj (Wellesley College), Dave Wolber (University of San Francisco), Ralph Morelli (Trinity College, Hartford, CT)
App Inventor is a new visual programming environment developed by Google, free to the public. Since Fall 2009, several educational institutions have been using it to teach programming in introductory computer science courses. This presentation will share experiences from these courses, showcase examples of mobile apps created by students, and discuss the future of App Inventor use in education.
Hunyue Yau (HY Research, LLC)
Prototyping a Mobile Linux device around off the shelf hardware has been easier then ever.Low power mobile processor boards such as the Beagle board can provide the core of a Mobile Linux Devicel A basic UI can be rapidly implemented by Android, QT, etc. This session will look at the process of getting a basic Android mobile device prototype built.
Jon Cruz (Inkscape)
SVG as a vector graphics format has been around for many years, but its usefulness has recently blossomed. Web support extending to being native in all major browsers, inclusion in HTML5, iOS device and now Android support are just the beginning of where SVG can be applied. This talk will give an overview of SVG and then present many of the different areas where one might use it today.
Josh Bloch (Google)
The Java programming language has evolved significantly since its introduction in 1995. In this talk, I'll discuss language changes from the addition of assertions in JDK 1.4 through Project Coin in Java 8, discussing what worked, what didn't, and why. Finally, I'll discuss ongoing efforts (Project Lambda for Java 8) and future plans, in light of the lessons learned from previous changes.
Stephen Chin (Oracle)
Visage is the successor to the JavaFX Script Language, a domain-specific language for writing UIs. It excels at rapid application design and can be used on any platform that supports Java. In this lab you will have an opportunity to write Visage applications that deploy to and run on Android mobile devices. No prior experience with Android or Visage development is required.