Sponsors

  • Google
  • JBoss
  • OpenShift
  • Oracle
  • VMware
  • WSO2

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the convention, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com

Download the OSCON Java Sponsor/Exhibitor Prospectus

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For information on trade opportunities with O'Reilly conferences or contact mediapartners@ oreilly.com

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For media-related inquiries, contact Maureen Jennings at maureen@oreilly.com

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OSCON Java Keynote Speakers

Keynote presentations at OSCON will leave you educated and inspired. Wednesday's keynotes will be shared with OSCON Data and OSCON Java attendees.

Josh Bloch

Josh Bloch, Google Software Architect, Open Source Program Office

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Joshua Bloch is a software architect in the Open Source Program Office at Google, author of the bestselling, Jolt Award-winning “Effective Java” (Addison-Wesley, 2001; Second Edition, 2008), and coauthor of “Java Puzzlers: Traps, Pitfalls, and Corner Cases” (Addison-Wesley, 2005) and “Java Conurrency in Practice” (Addison-Wesley, 2006). He was previously a Distinguished Engineer at Sun Microsystems, where he led the design and implementation of numerous Java platform features including the Java Collections Framework and JDK 5.0 language enhancements. He holds a Ph.D. from CMU and a B.S. from Columbia.

9:30am Tuesday, 07/26/2011
In my technical presentation, I'll be discussing all of the changes to the Java programming language since its inception. In this this keynote, I'll focus my attention on the starting point: I'll present my candidates for the best and worst features in the platform as it was originally released (JDK 1.0), and explain the reasoning behind my choices.
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Location: Oregon Ballroom 201/202
Patrick Curran

Patrick Curran, Java Community Process Chair, Java Community Process

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Patrick Curran is Chair of the JCP. In this role he oversees the activities of the organization’s Program Management Office including driving the process, managing its membership, guiding specification leads and experts through the process, leading Executive Committee meetings, and managing the JCP.org web site.

Patrick has worked in the software industry for more than 25 years, and at Sun (and now Oracle) for almost 20 years. He has a long-standing record in conformance testing, and most recently led the Java Conformance Engineering team in Sun’s Client Software Group. He was also chair of Sun’s Conformance Council, which was responsible for defining Sun’s policies and strategies around Java conformance and compatibility.

Patrick has participated actively in several consortia and communities including the W3C (as a member of the Quality Assurance Working Group and co-chair of the Quality Assurance Interest Group), and OASIS (as co-chair of the Test Assertions Guidelines Technical Committee). Patrick’s blog is here.

9:10am Tuesday, 07/26/2011
In this keynote Patrick will discuss the history of standards, the role that they play in the modern world, and the way in which Java standards are developed through the JCP. He will explain how Java developers can get involved in the standards-developing process, and the benefits of doing so.
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Location: Oregon Ballroom 201/202
Presentation: Who Needs Standards Presentation [PDF]

Joe Darcy, Oracle Member of Technical Staff

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Joe was the lead engineer of Project Coin and specification lead for JSR 334, the effort to select and implement a set of small Java language changes for JDK 7. From its inception in 2007 until March 2011, Joe was also the release manager, lead engineer, and quality lead for OpenJDK 6, an open source implementation of the Java SE 6 platform. A longtime member of the JDK engineering group, Joe was previously specification lead for JSR 269, the Pluggable Annotation Processing API, which delivered a standardized annotation processing API and mirror-based language model into JDK 6 to supersede the earlier apt tool from JDK 5. Joe assisted in implementing the JDK 5 language changes with work spanning core reflection, javac hacking, and general library support. Joe blogs at http://blogs.oracle.com/darcy.

10:00am Monday, 07/25/2011
Come hear a lively overview of the new features in JDK 7, including the language changes of Project Coin, the filesystem and other I/O features from NIO.2, and the new invokedyamic JVM instruction.
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Location: Oregon Ballroom 201/202
Steven G. Harris

Steven G. Harris, Oracle Senior Vice President, Application Server Development

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Steve Harris joined Oracle in 1997 to manage the development team that delivered native Java support in the Oracle database. Since that time, his team has grown to include overall Java server development at Oracle, including WebLogic, GlassFish, and the Java Enterprise Edition platform. Steve has been a key stakeholder and leader in open source and open standards work at Oracle, and in developing and executing on Oracle’s strategy in these areas. The acquisition of Sun has brought new opportunities and responsibilities to Oracle, particularly in the Java and open source worlds. Steve and the Java server team remain at the center of the many changes happening at Oracle as a result.

9:10am Monday, 07/25/2011
Mystified as to how Oracle’s decisions on open source fit together? Stop looking at your crystal ball and get insight into how Oracle views open source and the role Java plays in the developer community. Find out where Oracle sees Java heading and how you can navigate the best path as an open source Java developer and decision-maker to participate in moving Java forward.
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Location: Oregon Ballroom 201/202
Raffi Krikorian

Raffi Krikorian, Twitter Developer

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At Twitter, @raffi leads the Applications Services group, the custodians of Twitter’s core logic – his teams manage, amongst other things, the business logic, scalable delivery, APIs, and authentication of Twitter’s application. Previously, he was the lead of the public APIs as well as being the one of those behind Twitter’s Geospatial APIs.

Before Twitter he used to create technologies to help people frame their personal energy consumption against global energy production (Wattzon – Business Week’s “Best Idea” 2008), and also ran a consulting company building off-the-wall projects. At one point, he used to teach at NYU’s ITP (created the class “Every Bit You Make”) and spent way too much time as a student at MIT and the MIT Media Lab (Internet 0 – Scientific American September 2004).

9:30am Monday, 07/25/2011
Keynote by Raffi Krikorian, developer, Twitter.
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Location: Oregon Ballroom 201/202
Bob Lee

Bob Lee, Square Inc. CTO

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Bob Lee is the CTO of Square Inc. Prior to Square, Bob led Android’s core library development, created the Jolt award-winning Guice framework, and led JSR 330 Dependency Injection for Java.

9:45am Tuesday, 07/26/2011
Keynote by Bob Lee, CTO, Square Inc.
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Location: Oregon Ballroom 201/202
Martin Odersky

Martin Odersky, Typesafe Chairman and Chief Architect

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Martin Odersky is the inventor of the Scala language, a professor at EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland, and Chairman and Chief Architect of Typesafe. His work concentrates on the fusion of functional and object-oriented programming. He believes the two paradigms are two sides of the same coin, to be unified as much as possible. To prove this, he has worked on a number of language designs, from Pizza to GJ to Functional Nets. He has also influenced the development of Java as a co-designer of Java generics and as the original author of the current javac reference compiler.

9:45am Monday, 07/25/2011
Today's world of parallel and distributed computing poses hard new challenges for software development. A rapidly increasing number of developers now have to deal with races, deadlocks, non-determinism, and we are ill-equipped to do so. How can we keep things simple, in spite of the complexity of the underlying runtimes?
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Location: Oregon Ballroom 201/202