Sponsors

  • Google
  • JBoss
  • OpenShift
  • Oracle
  • VMware
  • WSO2

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the convention, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com

Download the OSCON Java Sponsor/Exhibitor Prospectus

Media Partner Opportunities

For information on trade opportunities with O'Reilly conferences or contact mediapartners@ oreilly.com

Press and Media

For media-related inquiries, contact Maureen Jennings at maureen@oreilly.com

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Contact Us

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Charles Nutter

Charles Nutter
JRuby Architect, Engine Yard, Inc

Charles Oliver Nutter has been programming most of his life, as a Java
developer for the past decade and as a JRuby developer for over four
years. He co-leads the JRuby project, an effort to bring the beauty of
Ruby and the power of the JVM together. Charles believes in open
source and open standards and hopes his efforts on JRuby and other
languages will ensure the JVM remains the preferred open-source
managed runtime for many years to come. Charles blogs at blog.headius.com and tweets as headius on Twitter.

Sessions

Java: JVM
Location: A105
Charles Nutter (Engine Yard, Inc)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 2 ratings)
JRuby is just a Ruby implementation for the JVM, right? Wrong! JRuby has gone well beyond other language implementations by supporting arbitrarily-encoded strings, native library calls, reloadable applications, and much more. This talk will explore how JRuby is pushing the JVM and Java platform in new directions, and how you can take advantage of this new power. Read more.
Java: JVM
Location: Oregon Ballroom 201
Charles Nutter (Engine Yard, Inc)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 7 ratings)
You've written applications for the JVM, using various frameworks and maybe even various languages. You understand how to rig up the CLASSPATH, get .class files to load, compile source, and set up an IDE. But you've always wanted a better understanding of the plumbing underneath. How does JVM bytecode work? What happens to bytecode after you hand it off to the JVM? Read more.