Sponsors

  • Google
  • JBoss
  • OpenShift
  • Oracle
  • VMware
  • WSO2

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the convention, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com

Download the OSCON Java Sponsor/Exhibitor Prospectus

Media Partner Opportunities

For information on trade opportunities with O'Reilly conferences or contact mediapartners@ oreilly.com

Press and Media

For media-related inquiries, contact Maureen Jennings at maureen@oreilly.com

OSCON Bulletin

To stay abreast of convention news and annoucements, please sign up for the OSCON email bulletin (login required)

Contact Us

View a complete list of OSCON contacts

Joe Darcy
Member of Technical Staff, Oracle

Website

Joe was the lead engineer of Project Coin and specification lead for JSR 334, the effort to select and implement a set of small Java language changes for JDK 7. From its inception in 2007 until March 2011, Joe was also the release manager, lead engineer, and quality lead for OpenJDK 6, an open source implementation of the Java SE 6 platform. A longtime member of the JDK engineering group, Joe was previously specification lead for JSR 269, the Pluggable Annotation Processing API, which delivered a standardized annotation processing API and mirror-based language model into JDK 6 to supersede the earlier apt tool from JDK 5. Joe assisted in implementing the JDK 5 language changes with work spanning core reflection, javac hacking, and general library support.
Joe blogs at http://blogs.oracle.com/darcy.

Sessions

Keynote
Location: Oregon Ballroom 201/202
Tags: java, jvm, jdk, coin
Joe Darcy (Oracle)
Average rating: ***..
(3.57, 7 ratings)
Come hear a lively overview of the new features in JDK 7, including the language changes of Project Coin, the filesystem and other I/O features from NIO.2, and the new invokedyamic JVM instruction. Read more.
Java: JVM
Location: A107/108
Tags: java, jvm, jdk
Joe Darcy (Oracle)
Average rating: ***..
(3.25, 4 ratings)
Starting in 2006, portions of the JDK code base were released under open source, starting the OpenJDK effort. Today OpenJDK 6 derived binaries are found in most Linux distributions and OpenJDK 7 is being used for the reference implementation of Java SE 7. Learn about the ongoing work in OpenJDK 6, hear about the new features in JDK 7, and get an overview of the functionality expected in JDK 8. Read more.