Sponsors

  • Microsoft
  • Nebula
  • Google
  • SugarCRM
  • Facebook
  • HP
  • Intel
  • Rackspace Hosting
  • WSO2
  • Alfresco
  • BlackBerry
  • CUBRID
  • Dell
  • eBay
  • Heroku
  • InfiniteGraph
  • JBoss
  • LeaseWeb
  • Liferay
  • Media Temple, Inc.
  • OpenShift
  • Oracle
  • Percona
  • Puppet Labs
  • Qualcomm Innovation Center, Inc.
  • Rentrak
  • Silicon Mechanics
  • SoftLayer Technologies, Inc.
  • SourceGear
  • Urban Airship
  • Vertica
  • VMware
  • (mt) Media Temple, Inc.

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the convention, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com

Download the OSCON Sponsor/Exhibitor Prospectus

Contact Us

View a complete list of OSCON contacts

Raymond McCauley

Raymond McCauley
Genomera

Website | @raymondmccauley

Raymond (www.raymondmccauley.net) is Chief Science Officer at Genomera, working on health collaboration and personal genomics. He has 20 years of experience in the biotech and high tech arenas, with Exponential Biosciences (www.exponentialbio.com), Illumina (http://www.illumina.com/), Ingenuity Systems, QIAGEN Genomics, Applied Carbon, various startups and governmental agencies, and a stint as executive producer for PBS television series at TANSTAAFL Media.

Raymond is on the faculty of Singularity University (singularityu.org), an advisor to two biotech stealth startups, and an active participant in the BioCurious Community Lab (www.biocurious.org), DIYgenomics (www.diygenomics.com), and Quantified Self communities. His background is in computer science, electrical engineering, biochemistry, biophysics, and bioinformatics, including graduate studies at Texas A&M University and Stanford University, with support from the NSF Student Scholar Program and a Lechner Fellowship.

His personal interests include genomic medicine, DIYbio, the citizen science movement, practical nanotechnology, and raising his twin boys to be superheroes.

Sessions

Citizen Science
Location: D136
Greg Biggers (Genomera), Raymond McCauley (Genomera)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 6 ratings)
How one person’s desire to know if his vitamins really worked became a set of tools for doing open, crowd-sourced health experiments. By combining data and analysis from engaged individuals, we can answer big questions traditionally asked exclusively by pharma companies and research institutions. And for less than 1/1000 of the cost. Read more.