Sponsors

  • Microsoft
  • Nebula
  • Google
  • SugarCRM
  • Facebook
  • HP
  • Intel
  • Rackspace Hosting
  • WSO2
  • Alfresco
  • BlackBerry
  • CUBRID
  • Dell
  • eBay
  • Heroku
  • InfiniteGraph
  • JBoss
  • LeaseWeb
  • Liferay
  • Media Temple, Inc.
  • OpenShift
  • Oracle
  • Percona
  • Puppet Labs
  • Qualcomm Innovation Center, Inc.
  • Rentrak
  • Silicon Mechanics
  • SoftLayer Technologies, Inc.
  • SourceGear
  • Urban Airship
  • Vertica
  • VMware
  • (mt) Media Temple, Inc.

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the convention, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com

Download the OSCON Sponsor/Exhibitor Prospectus

Contact Us

View a complete list of OSCON contacts

Personal schedule for Deborah Lewis

Download or subscribe to Deborah Lewis's schedule.

Javascript & HTML5
Location: Portland 251
Estelle Weyl (Standardista.com)
Average rating: **...
(2.90, 30 ratings)
HTML5 and CSS3 are the new buzz words. Recruiters will soon be asking for 5 to 10 years of HTML5 experience. While we can't give that to you, we can help you stay ahead of the game! In this workshop you will learn what CSS3 and HTML5 features are implementable and how to implement them. Read more.
Keynote
Location: Oregon Ballroom 203/204
Benjamin Black (Boundary)
Average rating: ***..
(3.67, 12 ratings)
Keynote by Benjamin Black, Co-founder, fast_ip. Read more.
Keynote
Location: Oregon Ballroom 203/204
Average rating: **...
(2.50, 2 ratings)
An open microphone question and answer session with the morning's keynote speakers. Read more.
Data: Hadoop
Location: C123
Tom Hanlon (Cloudera)
Average rating: ****.
(4.27, 11 ratings)
Hadoop gives you the ability to process massive amounts of data at scale. This presentation will show you how hadoop makes use of commodity hardware to allow you to build a system that scales, that deals gracefully with failure of individual nodes, and gives you the power of Map/Reduce to process Petabytes. Read more.
Data: NoSQL Databases
Location: B118-119
Tags: nosql_nerd
Roger Bodamer (10gen)
Average rating: ***..
(3.83, 6 ratings)
In this workshop, one of the core MongoDB committers will present the fundamental principles of MongoDB, how to set up and interact with the database, and what to consider when building applications using a document-based data model. Read more.
Data: NoSQL Databases
Location: B118-119
Ezra Zygmuntowicz (VMware Inc)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 2 ratings)
Redis is an entry in the new breed of nosql databases. But it takes a different approach that makes it much more interesting then most of the other key/value stores in the same category. Come learn what makes redis so useful that it seems everyone is adding it to their toolbox. Read more.
Java: JVM
Location: A105
Martin Odersky (Typesafe)
Average rating: ***..
(3.89, 9 ratings)
Multicore processors are on every desk now. How are we going to make use of the extra power they provide? A promising solution is parallel programming using collections. Programing by transforming and aggregating collections is simple and powerful, and can be parallelized well. In this talk I will describe the design principles behind the Scala collections framework which implements these ideas. Read more.
Noah Pepper (Lucky Sort), Homer Strong (Lucky Sort)
Average rating: ***..
(3.18, 11 ratings)
We produce gorgeous LaTeX reports while harnessing the power of R on the backend. The data is pulled from our PostgreSQL database, the analysis and visualizations are fast and distributed thanks to Redis. We'll talk about weaving together open source tools to build powerful analytics reporting engines that rival the commercial alternatives. Read more.
Programming
Location: D137/138
Andrew Gerrand (Google)
Average rating: ****.
(4.30, 10 ratings)
Go is a new, concurrent, garbage-collected programming language that aims to combine the speed and safety of a static language like C with the flexibility and agility of a dynamic language like Python or JavaScript. This hands-on tutorial will cover the essentials of Go, ranging from its basic syntax through to its type system and concurrency primitives. It is a huge amount of fun! Read more.
Java: Trends
Location: A105
Josh Bloch (Google)
Average rating: ****.
(4.85, 13 ratings)
The Java programming language has evolved significantly since its introduction in 1995. In this talk, I'll discuss language changes from the addition of assertions in JDK 1.4 through Project Coin in Java 8, discussing what worked, what didn't, and why. Finally, I'll discuss ongoing efforts (Project Lambda for Java 8) and future plans, in light of the lessons learned from previous changes. Read more.
Java: JVM
Location: A105
Steve Jenson (Twitter, Inc)
Average rating: ***..
(3.60, 5 ratings)
Twitter is the largest Ruby on Rails installation on the web right now -- however, we have been moving from solely hosting Rails applications to a mixed Rails and JVM deployment. This migration has been ongoing for a few years at Twitter and we now run several back-end, high-throughput, and critical components on the JVM. Read more.
Programming
Location: Portland 255
Rob Pike (Google, Inc.)
Average rating: ****.
(4.06, 18 ratings)
The Go programming language was designed to make programming productive and efficient. Go is a concurrent language that compiles quickly to machine code yet has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. This talk is an introduction to Go that focuses on how the design of the language helps it achieves those goals. Read more.
Geek Lifestyle
Location: D138
Ryo Chijiiwa (Laptop and a Rifle.com)
Average rating: ****.
(4.29, 14 ratings)
Ever wish you could live in a cabin in the woods? Geeks, with their high income, superior problem solving skills, and ability to work remotely, are often in a better position to realize such Thoreauvian dreams. Based on my own experiences of going from the cubicles of Silicon Valley to the backwoods of Northern California, the talk will cover the ins, outs, hows and whys of life in the woods. Read more.
Programming
Location: Portland 255
Brian Fitzpatrick (Google, Inc.), Ben Collins-Sussman (Google, Inc.)
Average rating: ***..
(3.64, 14 ratings)
Are languages, compilers, debuggers, and algorithms all you need to be a successful software engineer? In a perfect world, those who produce the best code should be the most successful. Unfortunately, we live in a world of imperfect people, and collaborating with others is at least as important as having great technical skills if you want to write great software. Read more.
Ruby
Location: D135
Kate Matsudaira (SEOmoz)
Average rating: ***..
(3.43, 7 ratings)
Ruby on Rails is a great framework for quickly building applications, but what happens when you are wildly successful and need to scale WAY up? This talk is a case study in the evolution of our Rails application from a monolithic "does everything" systems running on a hosted server to a service-oriented system running in the cloud. Read more.
Mobile Platforms
Location: Portland 252
Yehuda Katz (Tilde Inc)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 11 ratings)
Just a few years ago, most people used just a single personal computer, and application developers only needed to worry about single-device applications. Today, people expect to use applications on their desktops and seamlessly switch to phones, tablets or even televisions. Instead of just building an iPhone app, companies should think about the multi-device trend when designing a mobile strategy. Read more.
Python
Location: D133
Brian Quinlan (Google Australia)
Average rating: ****.
(4.67, 6 ratings)
A blatant rip-off of Josh Bloch's "Java Puzzlers: Traps, Pitfalls, and Corner Cases", Python Puzzlers reveals some of Python's productivity-threatening oddities by showing several short code examples and asking the audience to explain their behavior. Read more.
Cloud Computing
Location: Portland 251
Eric Day (craigslist), James Turnbull (Docker)
Average rating: **...
(2.83, 12 ratings)
The OpenStack project was launched last summer during OSCON by Rackspace, NASA, and a number of other cloud technology leaders in an effort to build a fully-open cloud computing platform. It is a collection of scalable, secure, standards-based projects consisting of compute, storage, images, and more. This session will introduce the projects, the principles behind it, and how to get started. Read more.
Open Data
Location: F150
Joseph Smarr (Google)
Average rating: ****.
(4.60, 5 ratings)
OpenID, OAuth, and other efforts to open up the social web are a dizzying mix of successes and setbacks. Are they being widely adopted, or eclipsed by proprietary alternatives? Are they good enough for mainstream users, or still too geeky? And have their fiercest proponents “sold out” by taking jobs at Google and Facebook, or are they continuing the fight from within? Come hear the inside story. Read more.
Brian Martin (Martin Consulting Services, Inc.)
Average rating: ****.
(4.18, 11 ratings)
So you've written a disaster recovery plan for your data center, and you've tested it until it works ... what could go wrong? Brian Martin describes his experience is a real, full scale "abandon the building" disaster, what went wrong, and draws lessons for taking a plan to the next level of reliability. Read more.
Ruby
Location: D135
Tags: ruby, unix, cli
David Copeland (Stitch Fix)
Average rating: ****.
(4.57, 7 ratings)
From a quick automation script to a more involved command-line based system, it's hard to make a polished and maintainable command line application. With Ruby, and a handful of open-source libraries, it's actually pretty easy. Read more.
Python
Location: D133
Charles Bell (Oracle), Mats Kindahl (Oracle)
Average rating: **...
(2.00, 4 ratings)
Managing a MySQL database server can become a full time job. What we need are tools that bundle a set of related tasks into a common utility. While there are several such utility libraries to choose, it is often the case that you need to customize them to your needs. The MySQL Utilities library is the answer to that need. It is open source so you can modify and expand it as you see fit. Read more.
Cloud Computing
Location: Portland 251
Tags: cloud, ruby
Wesley Beary (Heroku)
Average rating: ***..
(3.57, 7 ratings)
Cloud computing scared the crap out of me - the quirks and nightmares of provisioning cloud computing, dns, storage, etc on AWS, Terremark, Rackspace, etc - until I took the bull by the horns. Come see me demonstrate tools and examples that will allow you to skip the headaches and cut straight to the cloud. Read more.
Javascript & HTML5
Location: D137
Scott Davis (ThirstyHead.com)
Average rating: ****.
(4.56, 9 ratings)
JavaScript is the language everyone loves to hate. From its pathological global-fetish to its weird take on object-orientation (prototypes? really?), it's hard to believe that JavaScript has not only survived for the past 15 years, but continues to thrive. Read more.
Tools and Techniques
Location: Portland 255
Tim Anglade (Apigee)
Average rating: **...
(2.00, 11 ratings)
A look at the state of data storage, management & analysis, from SQL to NOSQL, “NewSQL” and beyond. I will explain why the core premises of data management have changed; tell some of the tales of success and failure I have collected on the topic; share some counterintuitive rules-of-thumb about the sometimes mind-blowing, sometimes nerve-wrecking reality of life with an alternative datastore. Read more.
Mobile Platforms
Location: Portland 252
Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Christopher Neugebauer (chris.neugebauer.id.au), Jonathon Manning (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 9 ratings)
Learn how to remain true to your open source ideals, as well as the open source community at large, when developing and designing software for Apple’s iOS. This talk covers the ins and outs of open source iOS frameworks and libraries as well as licensing pitfalls and tips. Read more.
Business
Location: E146
Simon Phipps (Open Source Initiative), Allan Foster (ForgeRock AS), Lasse Andresen (ForgeRock)
Average rating: ****.
(4.14, 7 ratings)
Most open source start-ups have some sort of lock on the code - dual licensing, contributor agreements, "open core" add-ons and more. But is it possible to start a profitable company without any of those - with just skilled people delivering expert service and developing new code in the community? I don't just think it's possible - I'm doing it! Read more.
Programming
Location: Portland 255
Roger Bodamer (10gen), Peter Neubauer (Neo Technology), Matt Pfeil (DataStax), Tim Anglade (Apigee), Antony Falco (Basho Technologies)
Average rating: *....
(1.75, 16 ratings)
This panel discussion features the key innovators in the NoSQL space. Read more.
Programming
Location: Portland 255
Piers Cawley (Thermeon)
Average rating: ***..
(3.29, 24 ratings)
Languages with first class functions are different. Callbacks and `each' are just the start - the fun really begins when you start learning from the Lisp guys and writing code that writes code that writes code. Think differently about your Javascript and do more with less code Read more.
Programming
Location: Portland 255
Alex Martelli (Google)
Average rating: ***..
(3.08, 26 ratings)
Designing interfaces so that other code can interact with ours (whether our code is a library, framework, application, website...) is a very common and clearly crucial activity, but fraught with dangers — stuff we all keep doing wrong time after time. This talks shows some common cases of API design errors encountered in the wild, with tips on how to avoid them when you design your next API. Read more.
Programming
Location: Portland 255
Jeremiah Peschka (Brent Ozar PLF)
Average rating: ***..
(3.27, 11 ratings)
Writing SQL is has very little in common with writing application code. Refactoring SQL has nothing in common with writing application code. Good object-oriented refactoring techniques frequently cause problems with SQL. This talk covers tried and true methods for refactoring SQL. Read more.
Cloud Computing
Location: D139/140
Stewart Smith (Percona)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 12 ratings)
Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. This is part survey, part critique of the various Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation and Durability models available from various modern databases and data stores used in modern Web and Cloud environments. Read more.
Open Data
Location: F150
Tags: design, api, oauth
Eran Hammer-Lahav (@WalmartLabs)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 5 ratings)
Sled (sled.com) is a new experimental productivity tool for small groups of close friends and family members. The session will take a detailed look at how OAuth 2.0 played a central role in the product architecture, and how it influence the product design and open source policy. Read more.
Jordan Sissel (Elasticsearch)
Average rating: ****.
(4.77, 13 ratings)
Get the most out of your logs with logstash. Logstash is free, open source, and scalable, and exists to help you debug, analyze, and correlate issues in real-time across your infrastructure and your business. Read more.
Programming
Location: Portland 255
Average rating: ***..
(3.91, 11 ratings)
How does Unicode support across major platforms, including Java, Perl, Python, Ruby, and more, stack up? Who's doing the best job, and who's failing miserably? Is anyone doing a good job? Does anyone actually implement to standard, and to what extent? I'll compare the major platforms to separate the losers from the not-so-losers. Read more.
Mats Kindahl (Oracle), Lars Thalmann (Oracle)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
The ability to replicate from one MySQL server to another is a well established and proven technology. Until recently, replication from a MySQL server to an external application was not supported. This technology would not only enable a universe of applications, it would also permit developers to integrate near real time data changes from MySQL quickly and reliably into their own solutions. Read more.
Education
Location: D138
Steve Hargadon (Classroom 2.0)
Average rating: ****.
(4.60, 5 ratings)
I've run the Open Source Lab for the last five years at some of the largest and most influential educational technology shows, including ISTE and CUE. Over the years I've gained some understanding of why and how Open Source Software is adopted (or not) by schools. Read more.
Programming
Location: Portland 252
Laura Thomson (Mozilla Corporation)
Average rating: ****.
(4.19, 16 ratings)
Review worst practices for releasing software: how to destroy scope in a single meeting; "death sprints" (more agile than death marches); how to avoid testing; how to make your software impossible to configure; and finally, when pushing out a webapp release, how to make your ops team hate you. This tongue in cheek session will review things learned painfully and late at night. Read more.
Javascript & HTML5
Location: Portland Ballroom
Bastian Hofmann (ResearchGate GmbH)
Average rating: ****.
(4.62, 21 ratings)
Nowadays many modern web applications are solely relying on JavaScript to render their frontend. But if you want to create mashups, load data from many different places or include external widgets into your site, you are quickly running into boundaries because of browser and security restrictions. In this presentation I will talk about techniques old and new helping you with such problems. Read more.
Tools and Techniques
Location: D136
Trevor Parscal (Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.), Roan Kattouw (Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.)
Average rating: ****.
(4.44, 9 ratings)
Discover a variety of creative techniques for dramatically improving page load speed which focus on low-hanging fruit rather than micro-optimization, and what impact they had when applied to the world's fifth largest website, Wikipedia. Trevor and Roan will explore optimization beyond server load, minification and gzip, and offer up new open source libraries to help others do the same. Read more.
Programming
Location: Portland 252
Gleicon Moraes (7co.cc)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 6 ratings)
Sometimes there is a mix between performance and scalability, but they are different dimensions. Changing your code from blocking to non-blocking yields scalability at the cost of a complexity. In this talk I show how Python, Ruby and JS do that, the differences between their async toolkits and some basic building blocks for web and high load applications. Read more.
Tools and Techniques
Location: Portland 256
Tags: git
Michael Schwern (eval Empire), Ricardo Signes (Pobox.com)
Average rating: ***..
(3.93, 14 ratings)
Git makes so much more sense when you understand how it really works. It only has two tricks, and they're really simple, but explanations go on about Directed Acyclic Graphs and Octopus Merges and a bunch of CS jargon nobody understands. Feh. You can illustrate and understand git using just children's toys! Read more.