Sponsors

  • Microsoft
  • Nebula
  • Google
  • SugarCRM
  • Facebook
  • HP
  • Intel
  • Rackspace Hosting
  • WSO2
  • Alfresco
  • BlackBerry
  • CUBRID
  • Dell
  • eBay
  • Heroku
  • InfiniteGraph
  • JBoss
  • LeaseWeb
  • Liferay
  • Media Temple, Inc.
  • OpenShift
  • Oracle
  • Percona
  • Puppet Labs
  • Qualcomm Innovation Center, Inc.
  • Rentrak
  • Silicon Mechanics
  • SoftLayer Technologies, Inc.
  • SourceGear
  • Urban Airship
  • Vertica
  • VMware
  • (mt) Media Temple, Inc.

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the convention, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com

Download the OSCON Sponsor/Exhibitor Prospectus

Contact Us

View a complete list of OSCON contacts

Personal schedule for Mark Allen

Download or subscribe to Mark Allen's schedule.

Tools and Techniques
Location: D136
Damian Conway (Thoughtstream)
Average rating: ****.
(4.71, 14 ratings)
The class examines (from a geek perspective) seven basic principles of good presentation, covering preparation, content selection, delivery techniques, and handling questions...or the lack thereof. It also explores a dozen simple and practical techniques for making your slides not suck. Read more.
Javascript & HTML5
Location: E145/146
Tom Hughes-Croucher (Change.org)
Average rating: ***..
(3.81, 21 ratings)
Learn how to build scalable Internet applications with Node.js, the event-driven server-side JavaScript framework. You'll see how Node.js solves many scaling and speed problems that weigh down other web application frameworks. Read more.
Event
Location: Oregon Ballroom
Average rating: ****.
(4.79, 24 ratings)
If you had five minutes on stage what would you say? What if you only got 20 slides and they rotated automatically after 15 seconds? Would you pitch a project? Launch a web site? Teach a hack? We’re going to find out when we conduct our third Ignite event at OSCON. Read more.
Programming
Location: Portland 252
Tags: developer, vim
Damian Conway (Thoughtstream)
Average rating: ****.
(4.96, 25 ratings)
You use your editor all day, every day. But how much of that editor do you actually use? This tutorial explores many of the less widely known but more powerful features of the Vim editor, and explains how developers can greatly improve their productivity by optimizing, automating, or even eliminating the common coding tasks they perform every day. Read more.
Perl
Location: Portland 256
Jesse Vincent (Best Practical)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 17 ratings)
Come learn about the Perl community's plans for our 2012 release: Perl 5.16. We'll look at how we're refactoring the core language, the Perl distribution and the Perl development community. Read more.
Perl
Location: Portland 256
Tags: perl, web, psgi, plack
Tatsuhiko Miyagawa (COOKPAD)
Average rating: ****.
(4.11, 9 ratings)
Plack and PSGI have opened a new landscape of developing Perl web frameworks and servers. Now that most web frameworks have adopted PSGI support, this talk will focus on the other side of the ecosystem: how to deploy Plack based web applications. Read more.
Perl
Location: Portland 256
Mark Allen (Mark Allen)
Average rating: ***..
(3.20, 5 ratings)
Dancer is a lightweight web framework for Perl inspired by Sinatra. Using simple URL routes and handlers to take action when routes are matched, it is possible to quickly build interesting and useful web applications with very little boilerplate code. This talk will cover the basics, as well advanced routing, plugins and showcase a tutorial application. Read more.
Perl
Location: Portland 256
Tags: perl_6
Damian Conway (Thoughtstream)
Average rating: ****.
(4.43, 21 ratings)
Over the past eighteen months Damian has revisited some of his most popular Perl 5 modules and reimplemented them in "native" Perl 6. In this talk he will walk through the changes needed to port several of those modules, a journey that gives a surprisingly thorough overview of how the two languages differ, as well as insights into the relative strengths of each. Read more.
Programming
Location: Portland 255
Mike Amundsen (API Academy, CA Technologies)
Average rating: ***..
(3.33, 15 ratings)
One of the key properties of RESTful Web applications is the ability to evolve over time. Too many Web APIs don’t evolve; they just get old, and useless; they rot. Why? Because they are little more than URI-based RPC calls returning serialized objects. Instead, Web APIs should rely on well-crafted media-type messages driven by links; they should be more RESTful. Read more.
Perl
Location: Portland 256
Damian Conway (Thoughtstream)
Average rating: ****.
(4.79, 28 ratings)
Once again, Perl's own Dr. Evil emerges from his secret lair on a remote Pacific island to beam a devastating onslaught of dangerously useful software ideas directly into your unsuspecting frontal lobes. Read more.
Python
Location: D133
Eric Holscher (Urban Airship)
Average rating: ***..
(3.50, 2 ratings)
Read the Docs is a documentation hosting site for the community. It was built in 48 hours in the 2010 Django Dash. In January 2010 it had 100,000 page views, and increases daily. I will talk about all of the code to deploy and run a sizable Django site. We will go through the highlights and interesting parts of the code, as well as some of the lessons learned from the site being open source. Read more.
Programming
Location: Portland 255
Alex Martelli (Google)
Average rating: ***..
(3.08, 26 ratings)
Designing interfaces so that other code can interact with ours (whether our code is a library, framework, application, website...) is a very common and clearly crucial activity, but fraught with dangers — stuff we all keep doing wrong time after time. This talks shows some common cases of API design errors encountered in the wild, with tips on how to avoid them when you design your next API. Read more.
Perl
Location: Portland 256
Average rating: ***..
(3.80, 5 ratings)
Simple patterns like [a-z] or \d no longer cut the mustard, partly because Unicode is such a large character set, and partly because of multiple ways of writing characters with diacritics. There are many land mines in regular expressions now that Unicode matters Read more.
Programming
Location: Portland 255
Average rating: ***..
(3.91, 11 ratings)
How does Unicode support across major platforms, including Java, Perl, Python, Ruby, and more, stack up? Who's doing the best job, and who's failing miserably? Is anyone doing a good job? Does anyone actually implement to standard, and to what extent? I'll compare the major platforms to separate the losers from the not-so-losers. Read more.