Sponsors

  • Microsoft
  • Nebula
  • Google
  • SugarCRM
  • Facebook
  • HP
  • Intel
  • Rackspace Hosting
  • WSO2
  • Alfresco
  • BlackBerry
  • CUBRID
  • Dell
  • eBay
  • Heroku
  • InfiniteGraph
  • JBoss
  • LeaseWeb
  • Liferay
  • Media Temple, Inc.
  • OpenShift
  • Oracle
  • Percona
  • Puppet Labs
  • Qualcomm Innovation Center, Inc.
  • Rentrak
  • Silicon Mechanics
  • SoftLayer Technologies, Inc.
  • SourceGear
  • Urban Airship
  • Vertica
  • VMware
  • (mt) Media Temple, Inc.

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the convention, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com

Download the OSCON Sponsor/Exhibitor Prospectus

Contact Us

View a complete list of OSCON contacts

OSCON 2011 Speaker Slides & Video

Presentation slides will be made available after the session has concluded and the speaker has given us the files. Check back if you don't see the file you're looking for—it might be available later! (However, please note some speakers choose not to share their presentations.) Also, check out the presentation files from the 2010 edition of OSCON.

Business

Wade Minter (TeamSnap), Andrew Berkowitz (TeamSnap)
Getting everyone in your company or development team on the same page can be a challenge. This on-your-feet workshop will teach fast, fun improv techniques for helping your group to bond as a team. Learn the secrets of improv-based team building from two professionals who have decades of experience working in open source, Internet start-ups and corporate training.
Richard Fontana (Red Hat, Inc.)
Presentation: external link
Formal contributor agreements give rise to a number of social, economic and ethical problems, threatening to undermine many of the advantages of open source development, without offering any real legal benefits. Projects and their sponsoring organizations should implement explicit but informal contribution policies that are grounded in free software tradition and that encourage community-building.
Wade Minter (TeamSnap), Andrew Berkowitz (TeamSnap)
You’re great with programming. You can code circles around the competition. People dig your technology. But will they love your company? In this session, two geeky individuals show you how their startup has managed to build a devoted following among a customer base that’s more Peyton Manning than Perl Monger, while winning praise from people like Robert Scoble and Jeanne Bliss.
Cat Allman (Google)
Free and Open Source projects are volunteer efforts but they still needs funds to pay for misc like bandwidth, hardware and the all important tee-shirts. This talk covers the basics of raising money: types of potential sponsors, choosing who to approach, how to "make the ask", special considerations for events, and some ideas on how to accept funds, including pitfalls to avoid.
Simon Phipps (Open Source Initiative), Allan Foster (ForgeRock AS), Lasse Andresen (ForgeRock)
Most open source start-ups have some sort of lock on the code - dual licensing, contributor agreements, "open core" add-ons and more. But is it possible to start a profitable company without any of those - with just skilled people delivering expert service and developing new code in the community? I don't just think it's possible - I'm doing it!
Tarus Balog (The OpenNMS Group, Inc.)
Building on last year's presentation on starting a business based on open source software, this presentation will cover the best ways to market such a business.
Sheeri K. Cabral (Mozilla Foundation)
Congratulations! You have done well having been promoted to managing your team....but how do you do that? Sheeri Cabral, DB Operations Lead at PalominoDB, takes her experience managing geeks and shows how to deal with tough geek management issues -- from how to deal with problem employees to the dreaded "how do you tell an employee they have body odor?"

Citizen Science

Rich Gibson (Gigapan.org), Schuyler Erle (SimpleGeo), Anne Wright (CMU)
The Explorable Microscopy project is creating open source devices to capture multi gigapixel images of small things: from frames from a bee hive down to individual diatoms.

Presentation

Joel Parker (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)
The General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) is an open-source mission design tool actively used and developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. It is available now in beta form, and will be released fully by the end of the year.
Melanie Swan (Broader Perspective)
Preventive medicine is a grand challenge. A key step is establishing baseline markers of wellness and pre-clinical interventions using personalized genomic data and phenotypic data. DIYgenomics has created such a methodology and completed a MTHFR/Vitamin B deficiency pilot study. An aging study is in enrollment, and other studies are in design for Vitamin D, metabolism, and mental performance.

Presentation

Cloud Computing

Paul Voccio (Rackspace), Ewan Mellor (Citrix Systems, Inc.)
There are many challenges to being able to move virtual machines to and from your datacenter and public cloud hosting service providers (in other words to obtain hybrid cloud mobility). In this session, members of the OpenStack and Xen.org communities discuss the open source and open standards approach that they are taking and include some of the challenges they face.
Wesley Beary (Heroku)
Cloud computing scared the crap out of me - the quirks and nightmares of provisioning cloud computing, dns, storage, etc on AWS, Terremark, Rackspace, etc - until I took the bull by the horns. Come see me demonstrate tools and examples that will allow you to skip the headaches and cut straight to the cloud.
Francois Marier (Catalyst IT)
An approach to building freedom-respecting online services and a presentation of Libravatar, a federated clone of the Gravatar profile image hosting service.

Presentation

Matthew Garrett (Nebula)
Real clouds look fluffy but mass up to a million tonnes. Virtual clouds look cheap but consume the output of 10 nuclear power stations. Real life factors can seriously influence your data center requirements. How can Linux help you?
wesley chun (Google)
Google App Engine is an application development and cloud-hosting platform that lets users create apps to run Google's datacenters. In this 3-part tutorial, we'll give a 1-hour intro talk on cloud computing and App Engine, a 90-100 minute introductory codelab to get your feet wet with App Engine development, and finally conclude with about a half-hour intro to some of App Engine's newest features!
Eric Day (craigslist), James Turnbull (Docker)
The OpenStack project was launched last summer during OSCON by Rackspace, NASA, and a number of other cloud technology leaders in an effort to build a fully-open cloud computing platform. It is a collection of scalable, secure, standards-based projects consisting of compute, storage, images, and more. This session will introduce the projects, the principles behind it, and how to get started.
Tom Hanlon (Cloudera)
Is your application distributed ? How have you chosen to deal with the implications of this distribution? In this session we will introduce and explore zookeeper. Originally developed at Yahoo and used by hbase, zookeeper is a wonderful tool. Zookeeper is straightforward and provides an interface allowing for easy configuration and use.
Wade Minter (TeamSnap), Michael Mayo (Rackspace)
OpenStack is an effort to build a completely open, community driven, enterprise-level cloud computing and storage platform. Not only is the technology open, but the APIs are as well. This session will show how to leverage the power of the current compute and storage APIs, as well as look down the road to future releases.
James Loope (Janrain)
This session will demonstrate an example scenario from Janrain and discuss the implications, benefits, and pitfalls of moving to a utility cloud computing architecture from a traditional co-located hosting environment.

Community

Jono Bacon (XPRIZE Foundation)
In this new talk from Jono Bacon, the Ubuntu Community Manager, author of The Art Of Community, and founder of the Community Leadership Summit, he discusses the changing state of community management, and what opportunities and challenges lay ahead for this young science.
Wade Minter (TeamSnap), Andrew Berkowitz (TeamSnap)
Getting everyone in your company or development team on the same page can be a challenge. This on-your-feet workshop will teach fast, fun improv techniques for helping your group to bond as a team. Learn the secrets of improv-based team building from two professionals who have decades of experience working in open source, Internet start-ups and corporate training.
Dave Neary (Red Hat), Dawn Foster (Puppet Labs)
Every community manager knows that community metrics are important. But they all have their own set of hacky scripts for extracting data from various tools. Building on the work of Pentaho, Talend, MLStats, gitdm and a host of others, we built a generic community dashboard for the MeeGo project. This presentation will cover the data we extracted, how we did it, and how you can do it too.
Audrey Eschright (Elevated Code / Stumptown Syndicate), Sherri Koehler (Samatha Yoga / Open Source Bridge / Ignite Portland), Christie Koehler (Mozilla / Stumptown Syndicate)
A fun, comprehensive overview of how to host a successful code sprint, hackathon, (un)conference or workshop.
Arthur Richards (Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.)
A reflection on how the Wikimedia Foundation raised $16 million using all open-source software for the annual fundraiser in 2010. Nearly all of the money raised came from small, online donations from users of Wikipedia and other Wikimedia projects. This talk will explore the components of the system, development methodology, challenges faced and challenges we face for next year.
Avni Khatri (Massachusetts General Hospital)
Ever dreamed of traveling to remote places and foreign countries and using your technology skills to improve the world? Come learn how you can join us (or perhaps learn to avoid some of our more dangerous exploits) and make the world a better place by teaching kids about technology and free and open source software.

Presentation

Sonya Barry (Oracle)
People hate change, and Java.net, a java-centric open source forge and community, needed a lot of change. Not just a facelift, but a whole new infrastructure with new development tools and a modern content management system. With 5600 projects and 600,000 registered members, and a handful of engineers dedicated to the task, how do you move a community this big without destroying it?
Ilen Zazueta-Hall (Enphase Energy Inc.)
Two years ago, the SFRuby Meetup routinely drew just one or two women to an event of 50 people or more. Twelve Railsbridge Open Workshops and six hundred students later, meetups now routinely draw 15-20% women. Applying open source thinking to workshop planning, organization and teaching made this change possible. Learn how you can use this approach to start a workshop of your own!
This talk explores the similarities and differences between Volunteers and Contributors and the various ways to keep "motivational paychecks" from bouncing. Developers can always point to their code as "proof" of contribution, but what can we give our non-developer volunteers as their "proof" of contribution.

Databases

Richard Tibbetts (StreamBase Systems)
StreamSQL EventFlow is a Complex Event Processing language for building real-time applications. EventFlow is unique in that it is primarily a visual language. This talk will focus on the StreamBase Event Processing Platform, the design of visual representations for language features and the co-development of an Eclipse-based IDE along with a new programming language.

Education

Wade Minter (TeamSnap), Andrew Berkowitz (TeamSnap)
Getting everyone in your company or development team on the same page can be a challenge. This on-your-feet workshop will teach fast, fun improv techniques for helping your group to bond as a team. Learn the secrets of improv-based team building from two professionals who have decades of experience working in open source, Internet start-ups and corporate training.
Jacinta Richardson (Perl Training Australia)
You have so much you want to teach, how do you structure it so that your training course is both interesting and challenging? How much theory can you squeeze into an hour before your attendees have forgotten where you started? How do you structure your course to account for classes which move slower or faster than average? This talk will cover all of these answers and more.

Emerging Languages

Tucker Taft (SofCheck)
This talk will introduce the new programming language ParaSail which is focused on two themes: programming should be by default parallel, with programmers working harder to make things sequential if necessary, and second, all checks should be performed at compile-time, including checks for race-conditions, uninitialized variables, out-of-bounds array indices, null pointers, numeric overflow, etc.
Karl Naden (Carnegie Mellon University), Jonathan Aldrich (Carnegie Mellon University)
Plaid is a new programming language with native support for typestate and permissions. Typestate captures the changing states an object can be in, allowing the object's interface, representation, and behavior to change. A gradual (optional) type system tracks the typestate of objects, using permissions like "unique" to reason in the presence of aliasing. The PL's power is demonstrated by examples.
Ola Bini (ThoughtWorks)
Presentation: Seph Presentation [PDF]
Seph is a new experimental language. It is based on pure differential prototype based object orientation, with immutability and polymorphic dispatch built in deep. Seph uses the new features in Java 7 to full effect, by compiling highly dynamic code to use method handles and invoke dynamic. It's got light weight threads and the mature concurrency primitives from Clojure.
Richard Tibbetts (StreamBase Systems)
StreamSQL EventFlow is a Complex Event Processing language for building real-time applications. EventFlow is unique in that it is primarily a visual language. This talk will focus on the StreamBase Event Processing Platform, the design of visual representations for language features and the co-development of an Eclipse-based IDE along with a new programming language.
Daniel Spiewak (Novell)
Object-functional languages have a number of desirable properties and have proven very useful in practice. Unfortunately, the merger brings with it a raft of complexities, being the root of nearly all of Scala's infamous complexity. This talk will present a new framework for resolving these issue, based around the notion of statically-typed functional object prototypes.
Yann Orlarey (GRAME, Centre National de Creation Musicale)
FAUST (Functional AUdio STreams) is a programming language for real-time signal processing and synthesis that targets high-performance DSP applications and audio plugins. The talk will be the opportunity to discover Faust and its applications in the musical and audio domains.
Andrey Breslav (JetBrains)
We present a new statically typed JVM-targeted programming language developed by JetBrains and intended for industrial use.

Geek Lifestyle

Michael Brewer (UGA: Franklin College OIT)
For the past two Open Source Bridge conferences, we've had Geek Choir sessions; in this presentation, we discuss lessons learned from the Geek Choir experience, advantages and disadvantages to mixing music and mathematically-inclined people, the benefits of singing, open source tools to assist in the process, and online open music resources. There also might be applied examples (aka singing).
Sarah Sharp (Intel)
Open source folks are naturally lazy. Anything mundane task they can automate, they will. So what does an open source developer do when faced with planning, planting, and tediously watering a garden? Automate!

Presentation

Matthew McCullough (GitHub, Inc.), Neal Ford (ThoughtWorks), Nathaniel Schutta (ntschutta.com)
Giving a presentation is a scary experience for most developers. Yet, worrisome as they are, they are a great way to influence technical decisions. They aid informed choices through the distribution of pertinent knowledge. Our highly actionable "Gang of Four" style patterns illustrate tried-and-true ways to build technical presentations that inform, convince and inspire.
Ben Collins-Sussman (Google, Inc.)
Think Zork is dead? Wrong! Come see what 30 years of evolution has done to the fascinating intersection of creative writing and programming. Witness the amazing open source tools that have made it possible: virtual machines, domain-specific programming languages, and IDEs. Learn about the intense indie community that develops these works, and how you can get involved as either a player or writer.

Government

Guy Martin (CollabNet), Aaron Lippold (Forge.mil)
Since its inception in 2009, Forge.mil, the Department of Defense’s groundbreaking collaborative software development platform, has improved the ability of agencies to rapidly deliver dependable software. This session will provide insight into the continued progress of Forge.mil, which has quickly garnered over 8000 members and over 400 projects.
Paul Scott (DSTV Online)
Presentation: Open Africa Presentation [ODP]
With the passing of the FIFA Soccer World Cup in 2010, Africa, especially South Africa, now has much better infrastructure availble for Open data access. Utilising African projects such as Chisimba, which allows for easy API creation, the time is now ripe to create semantically connected data stores for government, education and business
Ethan Phelps-Goodman (Sunlight Foundation)
The Sunlight Foundation and its partner organizations make a variety of data on the influence of money in politics and the operation of government easily available to application developers. This talk will give a broad overview of the data sets and APIs available and the applications that have been built with them, including stand alone sites, browser extensions and mobile apps.
William Schroeder (Kitware, Inc.), Brian Wylie (Sandia National Labs), Marcus Hanwell (Kitware, Inc.)
Open source serves as a superb platform for collaborative R&D and the practice of Open Science. In this panel three members of the research community discuss ways to fund, support, and grow research programs based on open source practices.

Presentation

Healthcare

Alison Muckle (NORC at the University of Chicago), Jason Goldwater (NORC at the University of Chicago)
The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) commissioned a Study and Report on Open Source Health Information Technology (health IT) as part of its obligation under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH). This represented the first time the Federal Government has ever invested resources into a study of open source EHRs
David Riley (The Alembic Foundation)
The Alembic Foundation promotes the use of Open Source to address significant challenges in society. As its first project, Alembic launched the Aurion Project to build upon the work of the federal government through CONNECT. Aurion extends the value of CONNECT by creating a forum for public and private organizations to build standards-based, Open Source health information exchange software.
Daniel Haas (Children's Hospital Boston)
Indivo (http://indivohealth.org) is an open-source health record platform, developed by the Children's Hospital Informatics Program in Boston, that empowers patients to take control of their personal health record. It is the "secure Facebook platform for personal health," enabling the development of substitutable personal health applications through which patients view and annotate their data.
Charlie Quinn (Benaroya Research Institute)
Case study in using open data and open source systems to enable research in personalized medicine. Will show how we leverage publicly available data along with clinical and experimental data from collaborators in 5 different countries to advance disease detection and personalized medicine.
David Richards (Fleet Ventures)
A survey of open source software for helping find patterns in pathologies and generating physician recommendations, with a focus on the presenter's Fathom, a decision support framework.
popHealth is an open source tool that allows healthcare providers to calculate quality measures. A quality measure is a calculation of the number of individuals in a population that meet a specific standard of care. This ONC sponsored effort integrates with electronic health record systems using standards based patient summary documents to calculate and report on quality measures.
Vaibhav Bhandari (Optum, United Health Group), Ali Emami (Microsoft, Health Solutions Group)
Do you want to enable your doctor to send your health information through an e-mail in secure way? Well, the Direct Project enables better patient care, and reduces cost of Healthcare by providing a standard and simple mechanism to share Healthcare information between providers, organizations and consumers. The project is an exemplary collaboration of public and private sector.

Presentation

Shahid Shah (Netspective)
Most medical devices today use proprietary/custom software platforms (operating systems, messaging framework, alarms, etc.). This talk will present the Shahid's recent work using FOSS to build safety-critical medical devices and the challenges associated with such solutions. Shahid will present architectures considered, the benefits and detriments, and findings of real-world FOSS implementations.

Java & JVM

Richard Tibbetts (StreamBase Systems)
StreamSQL EventFlow is a Complex Event Processing language for building real-time applications. EventFlow is unique in that it is primarily a visual language. This talk will focus on the StreamBase Event Processing Platform, the design of visual representations for language features and the co-development of an Eclipse-based IDE along with a new programming language.

Javascript & HTML5

Bradley Holt (Found Line)
CouchApps are web applications built using CouchDB, JavaScript, and HTML5. CouchDB is a document-oriented database that stores JSON documents, has a RESTful HTTP API, and is queried using map/reduce views. This talk will answer your basic questions about CouchDB, but will focus on building CouchApps and related tools.

Presentation

The Canvas element is one of the most exciting features added to HTML since the marquee tag. You can draw 2D graphics, implement special effects, edit photos at the pixel level, and bring rich animation to both desktop and mobile browsers alike; no plugins required! This workshop will cover Canvas in depth, from basic shapes to advanced pixel buffer effects, and even a few experimental APIs.
Estelle Weyl (Standardista.com)
Presentation: external link
HTML5 and CSS3 are the new buzz words. Recruiters will soon be asking for 5 to 10 years of HTML5 experience. While we can't give that to you, we can help you stay ahead of the game! In this workshop you will learn what CSS3 and HTML5 features are implementable and how to implement them.
Filip Maj (Nitobi)
Learn how to combine open source development tools with HTML5 to build full-featured, cross-platform mobile apps in HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

Presentation

Estelle Weyl (Standardista.com)
Presentation: external link
Web forms have been the bane of web developers existence for years. HTML5 Web Forms make forms (almost) fun. In this workshop, we'll cover the new HTML5 forms types and attributes, and show how web form building, UI and validation can actually be easy.
Remy Sharp (Left Logic)
Clue: I won't say "no" and sit in silence for 3 hours. This workshop I will go through a number of HTML5 and (new) non-HTML5 technologies and show you, with working code, how these technologies can be used in production today.

Presentation

Stoyan Stefanov (Facebook)
Doing more with less? How about learning one language and doing everything with it: client-side browser scripting, server-side programming with node.js, shell scripting, cross-OS desktop applications, browser extensions, photoshop scripting and even native phone apps. Come learn how to leverage "the world's most misunderstood language".

Presentation

Remy Sharp (Left Logic)
Presentation: Learning jQuery Presentation [ZIP]
Paper: Learning jQuery Paper [PDF]
Learn how to master the most popular and powerful JavaScript library by writing less and doing more.
Tom Hughes-Croucher (Change.org)
Learn how to build scalable Internet applications with Node.js, the event-driven server-side JavaScript framework. You'll see how Node.js solves many scaling and speed problems that weigh down other web application frameworks.

Presentation

Bastian Hofmann (ResearchGate GmbH)
Nowadays many modern web applications are solely relying on JavaScript to render their frontend. But if you want to create mashups, load data from many different places or include external widgets into your site, you are quickly running into boundaries because of browser and security restrictions. In this presentation I will talk about techniques old and new helping you with such problems.

Presentation

Matt McCarthy (Netflix), Kim Trott (Netflix)
Learn how Netflix builds its third-generation device user interfaces with web technologies. Between device performance limitations, new technologies like CORS and CSS3 transitions, techniques for managing directional input, and developing both subtle and wildly different UI variants for A/B tests, developing Webkit-based UI for TV devices like the PlayStation 3 is a whole new world.
Scott Mattocks (GSN Digital)
This talk looks at the advantages and disadvantages of different techniques for dynamic content updates: short polling, long polling, and WebSockets. These techniques allow web developers to provide users with a fluid experience that keeps pace with their expectations. The talk concludes with a deep dive into both the WebSocket API and protocol.

Mobile Platforms

Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Christopher Neugebauer (chris.neugebauer.id.au)
Presentation: external link
Learn why Android is awesome, and how you can build useful apps for the world’s most popular tiny computer even if you hate the idea of a telephone. Find out why a good UI and well thought-through interaction design are not optional components for mobile hackers, and build an actual app in 3 hours in this hands-on, fast paced tutorial. For existing programmers of any language at any level.
Joe Bowser (Adobe Systems)
A cautionary tale of all the documented and undocumented quirks involved with developing applications with web technologies on Android. This will cover the fundamentals, as well as the obscure facts about developing Android Web Applications in the real world.
PhoneGap is an open source Mobile framework for developing native applications for multiple devices. The developer programs using standard, well known Web technologies but gets access to device features using JavaScript apis. Build the app with web technologies, wrap it in the PhoneGap framework for device access, deploy on iOS, Android, Blackberry and more! One application, many platforms!
Maximiliano Firtman (ITMaster Professional Training)
Lots of mobile platforms and stores are available out there. How to create a mobile app for many mobile devices and platforms? How to deal with porting and compatibility problems? jQuery Mobile is a HTML5-powered framework, open sourced, that deals with these problem for us. Any web designer or web developer can create a mobile app in just minutes using standard HTML5 code.
Patrick Mueller (IBM, Apache)
Weinre is a debugger for mobile web apps. It reuses the user interface of WebKit's Web Inspector debugger to allow you to debug your web applications running on a device or emulator from your desktop.
Maximiliano Firtman (ITMaster Professional Training)
Presentations: external link,
external link
Mobile development becomes a big problem for everyone trying to create mobile applications, games or experiences. Standards, such as HTML5-related APIs and open sourced projects, such as PhoneGap, WURFL, or cocos2d for iOS and Android are great examples of how to create multiplatform solutions for mobile devices.
Deborah Wallach (Google), Eni Mustafaraj (Wellesley College), Dave Wolber (University of San Francisco), Ralph Morelli (Trinity College, Hartford, CT)
App Inventor is a new visual programming environment developed by Google, free to the public. Since Fall 2009, several educational institutions have been using it to teach programming in introductory computer science courses. This presentation will share experiences from these courses, showcase examples of mobile apps created by students, and discuss the future of App Inventor use in education.
Chase Douglas (Canonical)
Multitouch hardware has now reached consumer open source products. How can we enable developers to create immersive and useful touch software? How do we look to the future, while still enabling software from the past? In this talk, we will look at the new software technologies and frameworks that will revolutionize user interfaces.

Open Hardware

Federico Lucifredi (Canonical | Ubuntu)
This session aims to give you the tools to import the real world into the programming scope of your trusty $30 microcontroller, by covering the technology fundamentals and integration essentials of a wide variety of sensors and actuators, as well as providing a few alternative power schemes and even mobility options to increase the variety of choices in your design arsenal.
Colin Miller (Microsoft), Chris Walker (Secret Labs, LLC)
The makers of two collaborating Open Source projects--the .NET Micro Framework and the Netduino electronics platform--talk about how you can easily create connected devices using a RESTful interface and standard Web technologies. Come see how you can try out your own connected device solutions for under a hundred dollars using the same tools and skills that are used on the desktop.
Brian Gerkey (Willow Garage)
ROS, or Robot Operating System, was designed as the ideal open source (BSD) platform for personal robotics because a common software platform is the best way for roboticists, from university researchers to hobbyists, to share their best work and to grow the industry faster. In this session, Brian Gerkey of Willow Garage will provide an introduction to this rapidly-growing OS.
Hunyue Yau (HY Research, LLC)
Prototyping a Mobile Linux device around off the shelf hardware has been easier then ever.Low power mobile processor boards such as the Beagle board can provide the core of a Mobile Linux Devicel A basic UI can be rapidly implemented by Android, QT, etc. This session will look at the process of getting a basic Android mobile device prototype built.
Federico Lucifredi (Canonical | Ubuntu)
You can now easily place a trivially sized computing device anywhere a power plug is present. This fast paced session will provide a complete, hands-on review of the currently available Plug format devices, their capabilities, advantages and pitfalls. We will demonstrate development and debugging on the most recent Sheevaplug-class device as a hands-on introduction to embedded Linux environments.

Operations & System Administration

Mats Kindahl (Oracle), Lars Thalmann (Oracle)
The ability to replicate from one MySQL server to another is a well established and proven technology. Until recently, replication from a MySQL server to an external application was not supported. This technology would not only enable a universe of applications, it would also permit developers to integrate near real time data changes from MySQL quickly and reliably into their own solutions.
Leif Hedstrom (Apple)
Getting started with Apache Traffic Server can be a daunting task. There are a large number of configuration files and literally hundred of configuration options. This presentation will give the audience a thorough understanding how to setup and operate Traffic Server. We will pay extra attention to common use cases and scenarios, going into details for every use case.

Presentation

Shyam Mani (Mozilla Corporation)
Presentation: DNSSEC @ Mozilla Presentation 1 [PDF]
The story about deploying DNSSEC at Mozilla (for mozilla.org), the issues we faced & the mistakes we made.
Lance Albertson (Oregon State University Open Source Lab), Peter Krenesky (Open Source Lab)
Looking for an easy, scalable way to manage your Ganeti-based clusters? Ganeti Web Manager provides admins an easy to deploy, Django based GUI that effectively manages private clusters & works equally well for providing customers access. With a caching system designed to scale to thousands of virtual machines without decreasing performance, Ganeti Web Manager makes cluster management truly simple.
Lance Albertson (Oregon State University Open Source Lab), Peter Krenesky (Open Source Lab)
Ganeti is a cluster virtualization management software tool built on top of existing virtualization technologies such as Xen or KVM and other Open Source software. This hands-on tutorial will give an overview of Ganeti, how to install it, how to get started deploying VMs, & administrative guide to Ganeti. The tutorial will also cover installing & using Ganeti Web Manager as a web front-end.
Jordan Sissel (Elasticsearch)
Presentation: external link
Get the most out of your logs with logstash. Logstash is free, open source, and scalable, and exists to help you debug, analyze, and correlate issues in real-time across your infrastructure and your business.
Selena Deckelmann (PostgreSQL)
Presentation: Mistakes Were Made Presentation [PDF]
Ever have a code release go horribly wrong? Have a routine system upgrade turn into 12 hours of downtime? Had to field angry phone calls from engineers, customers and your boss? Sometimes things go horribly wrong. This talk will teach you how to plan for the worst, minimize risk and recover gracefully from failure.
Gerardo Narvaja (SkySQL Inc.)
Briefly review how to use mysql-agent w/ OpenNMS. Present an alternative using SNMP's pass_persist protocol. Walk through an example on how to add a new variable and it's corresponding chart in OpenNMS
Steven Ellis (Red Hat New Zealand)
A relatively recent addition to Linux, CGroups provide a mechanism to control resource allocation in a manner that has long existed on Unix environments. Most recently released Linux distributions now include CGroups in their standard package repositories, but few system administrators are aware of the features they provide.
Patrick Guiran (Linagora)
This talk focuses on building an SSH proxy which shields the remote targets from the users by hidding their specific credentials. Using an unpatched openssh on any UNIX flavor, sshGate provides an administration CLI, ACLs, groups, and logs users' sessions, which can be replayed anytime later. Users can use any standard ssh clients, and no installation is required on the managed targets.
James Turnbull (Docker)
Vagrant is a tool for building and distributing virtualized development environments. It uses VirtualBox combined with configuration management to deliver fast and portable development and testing environments. I'll demonstrate how to use Vagrant and Puppet to easily build environments that you can deploy (and re-deploy) to developers and testers.
Brian Martin (Martin Consulting Services, Inc.)
So you've written a disaster recovery plan for your data center, and you've tested it until it works ... what could go wrong? Brian Martin describes his experience is a real, full scale "abandon the building" disaster, what went wrong, and draws lessons for taking a plan to the next level of reliability.

Perl

Victor Felix (Univ. of Maryland)
With systems such as Grid Engine, Condor and others, it is relatively easy these days for organizations to create robust distributed compute farms. See how the Grid::Request Perl module can make the authoring, submission and control of large distributed jobs easy and in a scheduler agnostic manner.
Mark Allen (Mark Allen)
Dancer is a lightweight web framework for Perl inspired by Sinatra. Using simple URL routes and handlers to take action when routes are matched, it is possible to quickly build interesting and useful web applications with very little boilerplate code. This talk will cover the basics, as well advanced routing, plugins and showcase a tutorial application.
brian d foy (The Perl Review, LLC)
Presentation: Mastering Perl Presentation 1 [PDF]
In this tutorial, brian d foy will cover aspects of his book Mastering Perl, which is practical advice for working programmers on creating professional, enterprise-quality Perl programs. He will cover four major topics from the book: modules as programs, modifying and jury-rigging third party code, profiling Perl programs, and secure programming techniques.
Ricardo Signes (Pobox.com)
Moose continues to emerge as the new standard for writing OO libraries in Perl. It provides a powerful, consistent API for building classes with a minimum of code. It can be customized with reusable components, making it easier to refactor your code as you go. This tutorial will explain what Moose is, how its parts work together, and how to start using Moose today to get more done with less.
Jacinta Richardson (Perl Training Australia)
Perl has come a very long way even in the last 6 years since Dr Conway's Perl Best Practices book was published. This talk will provide a lightning tour of the current status of Perl's best practices using many of the ideas from Modern Perl.
Kevin Falcone (Best Practical Solutions)
Presentation: external link
As any open source project that leverages the power of the CPAN or other dependency rich sources knows, streamlining installation for your users is critical. Shipwright allows you to build and distribute relocatable vessels that can ship everything above libc and allow a user a truly dependency-free installation.
Simple patterns like [a-z] or \d no longer cut the mustard, partly because Unicode is such a large character set, and partly because of multiple ways of writing characters with diacritics. There are many land mines in regular expressions now that Unicode matters
A.Sinan Unur (Unur)
HTML5's canvas element allows graphics generation to be offloaded to the client's web browser. Various Perl modules make it easy to take data in various "spreadsheet" formats and turn them into easily chartable data. This presentation will demonstrate a simple web application built using Perl's Dancer to tie these elements together.

PHP

Damien Seguy (Expert Services Consultant)
PHP code is still audited manually. This is boring! Let's have PHP itself check its own dog food, and audit statically applications for security, code quality. It'll be faster, and more exhaustive than human, as long as we provide him with directions: here comes the cornac!

Presentation

Sebastian Bergmann (thePHP.cc)
Jenkins is the leading open-source continuous integration server. Thanks to its thriving plugin ecosystem, it supports building and testing virtually any project. This session will familiarize the audience with Jenkins and show how it can be leveraged for PHP projects.
John Mertic (SugarCRM)
Learn techniques and best practices for enabling customization of your PHP application
Gopal Vijayaraghavan (Zynga Game Network, India)
With the prevalence of multi-core systems and virtualization, several assumptions made during the design & optimization of PHP & APC are no longer valid. This talk covers the basic under-the-hood changes that have gone into making PHP perform better on multiple cores & virtualized environments.
Sebastian Bergmann (thePHP.cc)
Presentation: Reviewing PHP Code Presentation [PDF]
A code review can help detect bugs and keep the code maintainable. In this session, Sebastian Bergmann, a pioneer in the field of quality assurance in PHP projects and creator of various development tools, will introduce the audience to the best practices and available tools to perform code reviews of PHP-based software projects.
Sebastian Bergmann (thePHP.cc)
Packed with in-depth information and step-by-step guidance, this tutorial sets you on a path to create, maintain and extend sustainable software of high quality with PHP. You will learn how to plan, execute and automate tests for the different layers and tiers of a Web application.

Presentation

Kristopher Wallsmith (OpenSky), Jeremy Mikola (Exercise.com), Dustin Whittle (AppDynamics)
An in-depth tutorial on today's cutting edge PHP libraries including Symfony2, Doctrine2, Doctrine MongoDB ODM, Twig and Assetic. Get up to speed on PHP 5.3 in a hurry!

Presentation

Programming

Dean Wampler (Typesafe)
You've heard that Functional programming (FP) is good for concurrency. Mastering FP will improve all the code you write. FP changes practices like TDD; learn how design is more structured and tests are more precise. See why FP-style functions and data structures are actually more reusable than objects. Leave with new tools that eliminate bloat, improve code quality, and speed development.
Matt Harrison (MetaSnake)
Python is used all over the place and gaining in popularity. This introduction to Python assumes you know how to program, but don't know Python. You'll learn the basics, write some code and hopefully leave being able to grok Python.
Laura Thomson (Mozilla Corporation)
Review worst practices for releasing software: how to destroy scope in a single meeting; "death sprints" (more agile than death marches); how to avoid testing; how to make your software impossible to configure; and finally, when pushing out a webapp release, how to make your ops team hate you. This tongue in cheek session will review things learned painfully and late at night.
Gleicon Moraes (7co.cc)
Sometimes there is a mix between performance and scalability, but they are different dimensions. Changing your code from blocking to non-blocking yields scalability at the cost of a complexity. In this talk I show how Python, Ruby and JS do that, the differences between their async toolkits and some basic building blocks for web and high load applications.
Bryan Call (Yahoo!)
Techniques and tools to used to profile software applications. Examples and usage of OProfile, Google Profiler, Valgrind's Callgrind, and strace, geared towards profiling C/C++ applications. People should come away with the knowledge of what tools are available and how to diagnose performance issues in software.
Jeremiah Peschka (Brent Ozar PLF)
Writing SQL is has very little in common with writing application code. Refactoring SQL has nothing in common with writing application code. Good object-oriented refactoring techniques frequently cause problems with SQL. This talk covers tried and true methods for refactoring SQL.
Richard Hipp (SQLite.org)
Geeks hate paperwork and protocol, which presents a challenge to anyone trying to organize a quality-control system for an open-source software project. This talk describes and demonstrates how simple, unintrusive checklists that can reduce development time and improve software quality without provoking a mutiny.
Rob Pike (Google, Inc.)
The Go programming language was designed to make programming productive and efficient. Go is a concurrent language that compiles quickly to machine code yet has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. This talk is an introduction to Go that focuses on how the design of the language helps it achieves those goals.
Mike Amundsen (Layer 7 Technologies)
One of the key properties of RESTful Web applications is the ability to evolve over time. Too many Web APIs don’t evolve; they just get old, and useless; they rot. Why? Because they are little more than URI-based RPC calls returning serialized objects. Instead, Web APIs should rely on well-crafted media-type messages driven by links; they should be more RESTful.

Python

Eric Holscher (Urban Airship)
Read the Docs is a documentation hosting site for the community. It was built in 48 hours in the 2010 Django Dash. In January 2010 it had 100,000 page views, and increases daily. I will talk about all of the code to deploy and run a sizable Django site. We will go through the highlights and interesting parts of the code, as well as some of the lessons learned from the site being open source.
Matt Harrison (MetaSnake)
Python is used all over the place and gaining in popularity. This introduction to Python assumes you know how to program, but don't know Python. You'll learn the basics, write some code and hopefully leave being able to grok Python.
wesley chun (Google)
This talk is about the evolution of Python. We will discuss Python 2 and Python 3: what the compatibility issues are, what the main differences are, and also talk about migration, Python 2.6 & 2.7, and other transition tools.
Matthew Momjian (Student)
Blender has a powerful Python engine for automation and game creation. This talk will cover the basics of Blender python syntax and allow users to get started making their own 3D programs. Case study involving 3D countdown.
Charles Bell (Oracle), Mats Kindahl (Oracle)
Managing a MySQL database server can become a full time job. What we need are tools that bundle a set of related tasks into a common utility. While there are several such utility libraries to choose, it is often the case that you need to customize them to your needs. The MySQL Utilities library is the answer to that need. It is open source so you can modify and expand it as you see fit.
Joshua Boverhof (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab), Shreyas Cholia (NERSC)
RESTful HTTP web services have many advantages over the "big" web services paradigm of SOAP/WSDL/XML Schema. RESTful services are simpler to create, use, and test. REST/HTTP is native to the web, thus it's easy to digest these services from Javascript or a backend. NEWT is a RESTful web API to NERSC HPC resources, used by other scientific portals.
Charles McLaughlin (Atlassian)
Presentation: external link
In this session we'll cover the fundamentals of scaling Django applications using the Mercurial hosting service bitbucket.org for real world examples. We'll cover how we moved the site from EC2 to our own hardware in a data center and scaled to meet demand. Topics will include deployment, caching, replication, load balancing, and monitoring.
Adam Parrish (Socialbomb)
This presentation relates my experience teaching Python as a tool for creative writing---or, more specifically, as a tool for creatively reading, transforming, and generating poetic text. Code examples link Python with contemporary practices in creative writing (cut-ups, flarf, generative poetics). Discussion will include hints, tips, and obstacles in using Python in a pedagogical environment.
Pyramid is the web framework at the core of the Pylons Project. It's a "pay only for what you eat" framework. You can get started easily and learn new concepts as you go, and only if you need them. It's simple, well tested, well documented, and fast. This course will present Pyramid and lead you through the creation of a an application as the concepts from the framework are introduced.

Ruby

Darian Shimy (Attensity)
Hot Potato is an open source real-time processing framework written in Ruby. Originally designed to process the Twitter firehose at 3,000+ tweets per second, it has been extended to support any type of streaming data as input or output to the framework.
Gregg Pollack (Envy Labs), Eric Allam (Envy Labs), Tyler Hunt (Envy Labs), Carlos Souza (Envy Labs), Jason VanLue (Envy Labs), Nick Walsh (Envy Labs)
This is an introductory course which teaches the basics of web application development using the Ruby language with the most recent release of the Ruby on Rails framework. If you've never tried Rails or you've only "played with it" at home, then this tutorial is for you.
Clinton N. Dreisbach (Relevance, Inc.)
Smart developers have been using Ruby on Rails to build web applications for over 5 years. Cutting-edge projects have aged into legacy apps. Rails 3 and Ruby 1.9 offer new features that are guaranteed to take the squeak out of that old wheel and grease the tracks of new development. We're going to walk through upgrading real projects and work together to solve issues the audience has found.
David Copeland (Stitch Fix)
Presentation: external link
From a quick automation script to a more involved command-line based system, it's hard to make a polished and maintainable command line application. With Ruby, and a handful of open-source libraries, it's actually pretty easy.

Tools and Techniques

John Hawley (Red Hat), Shawn Pearce (Google)
The Google Android platform has sky rocketed in popularity over the last few years, boasting uncounted devices and a vibrant development community. We aim to pull back the curtain on the behind the scenes infrastructure that supports this world wide development effort from Gerrit code review to the servers that push the source code.
Tim Anglade (Apigee)
A look at the state of data storage, management & analysis, from SQL to NOSQL, “NewSQL” and beyond. I will explain why the core premises of data management have changed; tell some of the tales of success and failure I have collected on the topic; share some counterintuitive rules-of-thumb about the sometimes mind-blowing, sometimes nerve-wrecking reality of life with an alternative datastore.

Presentation

Zhi-Da Zhong (Etsy)
We'll talk about the roles of A/B testing and similar techniques in web applications, examine an open-source A/B framework for PHP, and present general design ideas that can be applied to building similar systems using other technology stacks.
Tim Berglund (GitHub), Matthew McCullough (GitHub, Inc.)
Presentation: Git Foundations Presentation [PDF]
Matthew McCullough, trainer for GitHub.com, and Tim Berglund, co-presenter of the O'Reilly Git Master Class, will guide you through the fundamentals of Git in three hours of lecture, discussion, and hands-on exercises.
Trevor Parscal (Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.), Roan Kattouw (Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.)
Discover a variety of creative techniques for dramatically improving page load speed which focus on low-hanging fruit rather than micro-optimization, and what impact they had when applied to the world's fifth largest website, Wikipedia. Trevor and Roan will explore optimization beyond server load, minification and gzip, and offer up new open source libraries to help others do the same.
Neil Mansilla (Mashery, Inc.)
Presentations: external link,
external link
A web API needs documentation, unit tests, functional tests and possibly a WADL. Usually one or more is out of date or just doesn't exist. The Unico DSL can generate all these for you from a natural-language document written by project manager-types. Build a quick API in this session and BELIEVE.

Presentation

John Goulah (Etsy), Erik Kastner (Kickstarter)
Developers deploy production code more than 20 times per day at Etsy. Small rapid changes allow us to move fast, detect failure, and respond quickly. This works for a number of cultural and technical reasons. Learn about the tool we built, Deployinator, to automate this processand how we accomplish this effectively.
Jon Cruz (Inkscape)
SVG as a vector graphics format has been around for many years, but its usefulness has recently blossomed. Web support extending to being native in all major browsers, inclusion in HTML5, iOS device and now Android support are just the beginning of where SVG can be applied. This talk will give an overview of SVG and then present many of the different areas where one might use it today.
Lindsey Simon (Google)
As the market for browsers on the desktop and mobile platforms becomes increasingly fragmented, remembering what works where and what doesn't becomes increasingly hard. Browserscope is an open source, community-driven project for profiling web browsers. The goals are to foster innovation by tracking and sharing browser functionality and performance. Learn how you can use this cloud resource.

Open Data

Eric van der Vlist (Dyomedea)
Links that disappear are a major threat for long living sites. This danger can be minimized by creating personal web archives. A next step could be to create a catalogue of these personal web archives to build a decentralized collective memory of the web. This presentation proposes a first step to bootstrap this process.
Matt Blair (Elsewise LLC)
Presentation: external link
A review of three open data projects, from a developer's perspective: assembling a map of poetry posts, crowd-sourcing photos of Heritage Trees, and showcasing Portland's extensive collection of Public Art. Includes practical tips, such as using CouchDB to manage datastores that continue to evolve based on citizen input. Ideal for anyone hoping to get their community engaged in open data projects.

Presentation

Joseph Smarr (Google)
OpenID, OAuth, and other efforts to open up the social web are a dizzying mix of successes and setbacks. Are they being widely adopted, or eclipsed by proprietary alternatives? Are they good enough for mainstream users, or still too geeky? And have their fiercest proponents “sold out” by taking jobs at Google and Facebook, or are they continuing the fight from within? Come hear the inside story.
Luke Closs (Recollect)
Come learn the story of the award winning VanTrash open data app and the opportunities such apps can lead to for sustainable development of open data applications. Luke will show different models that open data hackers can pursue to turn their projects into small businesses.
Daniel Jacobson (Netflix)
The Netflix API has been incredibly successful in getting your favorite movies and TV shows on to hundreds of devices. It is handling billions of requests and is the centerpiece of the Netflix distribution strategy. Given this tremendous success, why are we completely redesigning the API? Come and find out how we plan to make the API better, scale it in the cloud and improve our API's efficiency.
Chris Smith (Portland Transport)
The Transit Appliance project uses real-time arrival web services, low-cost hardware like the Chumby, a light layer of open source JavaScript business logic and JSON data stores to put transit information in front of users in building lobbies, cafes and other public and private locations at disruptively low costs.

Data: Analytics and Visualization

Jonathan Seidman (Orbitz Worldwide), Ramesh Venkataramaiah (Orbitz Worldwide)
An overview of the state of the art for bringing together the analytical power of the R language with the big data capabilities of Hadoop.
Jeff Hamann (Forest Informatics)
Learn how to cobble together a PostgreSQL database, install a few handy R packages, a pinch of language extensions, and a handful of publicly available data to generate a forest monitoring platform to help landscape managers make better decisions using basic design-engineering paradigms to perform quick trade-off analyses.
Robin Anil (Google), Ted Dunning (MapR Technologies)
This hands-on tutorial aims at learning the basics of the important machine learning algorithms in Mahout. It aims to help you get it up and running on a Hadoop cluster. Mahout is open source implementation of a collection of algorithms designed from ground up to sift through terabytes of data and help bring out important patterns which are otherwise not in the reach of standard tools.

Presentation

Jean-Daniel Cryans (Cloudera)
Imagine for a moment doing a JOIN on two HBase tables, crazy talk right? Well now you can thanks to Hive. True, it is only meant to be used in a batch context, but we have being doing it for a few months now at StumbleUpon and our analysts and engineers love it. This presentation will cover how the Hive-HBase integration works and how we use it at our company.
Josh Patterson (Cloudera)
Time Series sensors are being ubiquitously integrated in places like cell phones, environmental sensors, and the smart grid. As we scale out this type of data RDBMS systems strain to scale with the high insertion rates and real time query requirements. In this talk we introduce “Lumberyard” which is a scalable indexing and low latency fuzzy pattern searching time series data.
Russell Hanson (RSI/Harvard/TCIN)
Synthetic biology is a new field where basic biological components can be engineered to create something new. It often involves DNA synthesizers, ligation, promoters, and polymerase chain reaction -- which may or may not be safe for your in silico environment. However, as the size and complexity of the systems increase, tools become more and more important, thus CAD for biology has emerged.

Data: Big Data

Tom Wilkie (Acunu Ltd)
The standard Linux storage stack wasn't designed for write-heavy big data workloads, nor is it well-suited to modern hardware: large, slow SATA disks, SSDs or many cores. Castle, an open-source project, is a ground-up overhauling of RAID, file systems, and the POSIX interface.
Jared Williams (New York State Senate), Noel Hidalgo (World Economic Forum), Graylin Kim (New York State Senate)
The story of the development team and what lessons we learned in building Open Legislation - an open government platform. It will detail our transition from a MySQL back end to an application fully powered by Lucene, the data quality and efficiency issues that we’ve had to address, and how we’re now trying to rebuild internal trust after our iterative and initially shaky development process.
Jay Kreps (LinkedIn)
The last few years have brought a wealth of new data technologies organized around horizontal scalability. This talk will cover the essential infrastructure areas: real-time stream processing, offline data crunching, large-scale data deployments and live serving. The focus will be on how these ingredients come together to enable innovative data-driven products at LinkedIn.

Presentation

Data: Scaling

Laura Thomson (Mozilla Corporation), Josh Berkus (PostgreSQL Experts), Corey Shields (Mozilla Corporation), Justin Dow (Mozilla Corporation)
If you've ever had to move from data center to data center or to the cloud, or from old hardware to new hardware, you know that it's even more painful than moving house. In this presentation, survivors will tell you how to stay sane (and how to get it right) with a case study from Mozilla: moving 30TB of crash reports with no downtime in data collection.
Andy Blyler (Barracuda Networks), Lindsay Snider
Solr, an open source enterprise search server, scales very well within an index (vertical scaling). It is when you have multiple indexes (horizontal scaling) that it starts to get hairy, which happens a lot when you are hosting a cloud based solution for multiple users. In this session we will discuss these issue as well as the techniques of how to overcome them in-depth.

Presentation

Data: Hadoop

Owen O'Malley (HortonWorks)
Adding security to an existing product is never easy, but our team at Yahoo added strong authentication to Apache Hadoop by integrating it with Kerberos. This project was delivered on time and is currently deployed on all of Yahoo's 40,000 Hadoop computers. Come learn how we added security to and why it matters.
Greg Fodor (Etsy)
The data & analytics teams at Etsy build up and tear down more than a thousand independent Hadoop clusters on EC2 each month. This talk discusses the benefits of this approach, where Elastic Map Reduce serves as a "meta-cluster" in which on-demand Hadoop clusters can be created, used, and shut down quickly and easily.
Tom Hanlon (Cloudera)
Hadoop gives you the ability to process massive amounts of data at scale. This presentation will show you how hadoop makes use of commodity hardware to allow you to build a system that scales, that deals gracefully with failure of individual nodes, and gives you the power of Map/Reduce to process Petabytes.
Josh Patterson (Cloudera)
Time Series sensors are being ubiquitously integrated in places like cell phones, environmental sensors, and the smart grid. As we scale out this type of data RDBMS systems strain to scale with the high insertion rates and real time query requirements. In this talk we introduce “Lumberyard” which is a scalable indexing and low latency fuzzy pattern searching time series data.
Arun Murthy (Hortonworks Inc.)
YARN is the next generation of Hadoop Map-Reduce designed to scale out much further while allowing for running applications other than pure Map-Reduce in a highly fault-tolerant manner.

Data: Relational

Ryan Lowe (Percona), Haidong Ji (Percona)
With most modern web applications, there are requirements for both SQL access to complex data as well as simple Key-Value look-ups. This session will cover how to use the HandlerSocket Plug-In for MySQL to get exponentially faster look-ups for simple access patterns.
Bruce Momjian (EnterpriseDB)
Presentation: MVCC Unmasked Presentation [PDF]
Multiversion Concurrency Control (MVCC) allows Postgres to offer high concurrency even during significant database read/write activity. MVCC specifically offers behavior where "readers never block writers, and writers never block readers". This talk explains how MVCC is implemented in Postgres and highlights optimizations which minimize the downsides of MVCC. This talk is for advanced users.
Presentation: external link
We at DeNA (largest social game provider in Japan) handle over 2 billion page views per day with MySQL. We heavily use SSD and tune Linux. We run non-trivial solutions such as non-stop, automated MySQL master failover. We also use MySQL not only as traditional RDBMS but also an extremely high performance NoSQL. I'd like to introduce our MySQL solutions to make our social games scale better.
Lars Thalmann (Oracle)
We describe the new replication features in MySQL 5.5 (GA) and MySQL 5.6 (Development release).
Jeremy Bingham (Dailykos.com)
Keeping a busy site going when you don't have a lot of servers or developer resources can be a struggle. Hear what we did at Daily Kos to make the most of what we had to bring MySQL in line, make it quick, and keep the users and the boss happy.

Data: NoSQL Databases

Roger Bodamer (10gen)
In this workshop, one of the core MongoDB committers will present the fundamental principles of MongoDB, how to set up and interact with the database, and what to consider when building applications using a document-based data model.

Presentation

Jeffrey Kirkell (Project Management Institute)
The popularity of NoSQL opens up an endless array of possible uses but also causes its own set of problems. Riak, a NoSQL offering created by Basho solves this by claiming to have no single point of failure. Proving this goes a long way to dispelling the concerns within an enterprise to begin adopting a non-relational solution.
Bradley Holt (Found Line)
Presentation: external link
CouchDB is a document-oriented database that uses JSON documents, has a RESTful HTTP API, and employs map/reduce views for querying data. This tutorial will teach web developers the concepts they need to get started using CouchDB in their projects. Libraries are available for CouchDB’s RESTful HTTP API in many programming languages and we will take a look at some of the more popular ones.
Josh Patterson (Cloudera)
Time Series sensors are being ubiquitously integrated in places like cell phones, environmental sensors, and the smart grid. As we scale out this type of data RDBMS systems strain to scale with the high insertion rates and real time query requirements. In this talk we introduce “Lumberyard” which is a scalable indexing and low latency fuzzy pattern searching time series data.
Siddharth Anand (LinkedIn)
Presentation: external link
Over the past few years, Netflix has migrated to the cloud. This talk details Netflix's transition away from relational databases and towards high-availability (NoSQL) storage systems. We rely on a combination of proprietary (e.g. SimpleDB and S3) and open-source (e.g. Cassandra and HBase) NoSQL technologies.

Presentation

Adam Silberstein (Yahoo!)
Presentations: PNUTS Presentation [PPTX],
PNUTS Presentation 1 [PPT]
I will overview PNUTS, a large-scale, geographically-replicated serving data store in widespread use at Yahoo! I will introduce key use cases, the main system components, key design decisions, and ongoing work.
Rusty Klophaus (Basho Technologies)
The Basho engineering team has been working to make Riak more queryable with the addition of built-in indexing plus a SQL-style query language. In this talk, Rusty describes the usage, benefits, limitations, and evolution of this this functionality, called Secondary Indices. He also covers the challenges and pitfalls of adding indexing to a distributed datastore.
Erik Hatcher (LucidWorks)
Quick and effective jump start for using Apache Solr, the Lucene-based search server. Solr powers the search and discovery systems of sites such as Zappos, Smithsonian's collections, The Motley Fool, Orbitz, and many many others. This three hour session will give you the basics to immediately begin using Solr on your own data.

Presentation

Data: Real-Time and Streaming

David Pacheco (Joyent), Brendan Gregg (Netflix)
We'll present the architecture and implementation of a Node.js/DTrace-based distributed platform for analyzing the performance of cloud applications in real-time. We'll do a live demo on a real, internet-facing cloud and discuss some of the interesting performance pathologies we've found and explained using this tool.
Benoit Sigoure (StumbleUpon, Inc.)
OpenTSDB is an open-source, distributed time series database designed to monitor large clusters of commodity machines at an unprecedented level of granularity. OpenTSDB enables operations teams to keep track in real-time of all the metrics exposed by operating systems, applications and network equipment, and makes the data easily accessible.
Aaron Kimball (Magnify Consulting)
This talk introduces an open-source SQL-based system for continuous or ad-hoc analysis of streaming data built on top of Flume-based data collection for Hadoop. Attendees will understand how to use a new tool to extend their Hadoop data collection pipeline with real-time streaming analytics.
John Hugg (VoltDB)
In this talk, we will introduce a simple formula for all Big Data applications: Big Data = Fast Data + Deep Data. Through a use-case format, we will discuss the specialized requirements for real-time (“fast”) and analytic (“deep”) data management.

Data: Roulette

Gleicon Moraes (7co.cc)
Ever had to dig into a system that misused the most basic features of a RDBMS ? Better yet - after the whole NoSQL storm had you wondered why it didn't shown before when you had to twist your schema to fit into something it was not designed for ? Check on this anti-patterns collection and feel better that you are not alone - and how you can benefit from it even not having big data around.
Sharing data is critical in a world where crisis can occur at any moment. Often, valuable data is stored in disparate locations with no information on how to access. This presentation discusses spatial data discovery and open source tools for implementing a data-sharing catalog. Esri’s Geoportal Server will be used to show sharing and discovery in action. Talk is open to all attendees.
Peter Neubauer (Neo Technology)
Location-based services are hot, but geographic datasets are complex. But this shouldn’t put you off writing awesome location-aware services. This talk will show how to create spatial models and query the Open Street Map dataset together with social data using the Neo4j graph database.

Presentation

Ted Dziuba (eBay Local/Milo.com)
What happens when you write data to disk? We'll explore everything between your programming language and the spinning platters - both optimizations and dangerous pitfalls.

Java: Cloud

Martin Odersky (Typesafe)
Akka is using the Actors together with STM to create a unified runtime and programming model for scaling both UP (multi-core) and OUT (grid/cloud). Akka provides location transparency by abstracting away both these tangents of scalability by turning them into an ops task. This gives the Akka runtime freedom to do adaptive automatic load-balancing, cluster rebalancing, replication & partitioning
Adrian Cole (jclouds)
You've heard about NoSQL. You've heard about the Cloud. What if you could spin up something like HBase in a couple minutes and try out both at the same time. By the end of this session, you'll learn how to do just that, in a way portable across several NoSQL projects and dozens of compute clouds.
Andrew Phillips (jclouds)
As adoption of cloud platforms grows, both in dedicated and "mixed-use" configurations, the original Cloud 1.0 vision of "run anything, anywhere" has been extended and refined to cover a number of considerations that are turning out to be essential across various cloud usage models.

Presentation

Java: Craftsmanship

Andrew Bayer (Cloudera, Inc.)
A look at using Jenkins for continuous integration, focusing on three different use cases at three different companies, along with a general update on the state of the project.
Yoav Landman (JFrog)
See the challenges and some of the best practices behind assembling robust continuous release and delivery pipelines. Learn how to combine your CI server with smart module management to achieve full release automation.

Java: JVM

Stuart Sierra (Relevance, Inc.)
Meet Clojure, a new dynamic language for the JVM, with innovative ideas for state management and concurrency.
Steve Jenson (Twitter, Inc)
Twitter is the largest Ruby on Rails installation on the web right now -- however, we have been moving from solely hosting Rails applications to a mixed Rails and JVM deployment. This migration has been ongoing for a few years at Twitter and we now run several back-end, high-throughput, and critical components on the JVM.
Martin Odersky (Typesafe)
Multicore processors are on every desk now. How are we going to make use of the extra power they provide? A promising solution is parallel programming using collections. Programing by transforming and aggregating collections is simple and powerful, and can be parallelized well. In this talk I will describe the design principles behind the Scala collections framework which implements these ideas.
Charles Nutter (Engine Yard, Inc)
JRuby is just a Ruby implementation for the JVM, right? Wrong! JRuby has gone well beyond other language implementations by supporting arbitrarily-encoded strings, native library calls, reloadable applications, and much more. This talk will explore how JRuby is pushing the JVM and Java platform in new directions, and how you can take advantage of this new power.
Charles Nutter (Engine Yard, Inc)
You've written applications for the JVM, using various frameworks and maybe even various languages. You understand how to rig up the CLASSPATH, get .class files to load, compile source, and set up an IDE. But you've always wanted a better understanding of the plumbing underneath. How does JVM bytecode work? What happens to bytecode after you hand it off to the JVM?

Presentation

Tom Lee (Shine Technologies)
Learn how to build a simple JVM compiler with Scala's parser combinators and Apache's BCEL.
Tim Berglund (GitHub)
In the bewildering array of Java and JVM frameworks, Grails is emerging as a standard choice in environments ranging from startups to the enterprise. It's a full-stack solution build on rock-solid components, fully relying on convention over configuration, and using the best application language the JVM has yet seen: Groovy. This is the place to be for web apps on the JVM.
Daniel Hinojosa (evolutionnext.com)
Presentation: Testing in Scala Presentation [ODP]
The best way to learn a new language happens to be the best way to program - with a test. Learn test-driven development in Scala with this introductory presentation to some of Scala's most popular tools like SBT, Specs, ScalaTest, Borrachio, and Scala Check.
Stephen Chin (Oracle)
Visage is the successor to the JavaFX Script Language, a domain-specific language for writing UIs. It excels at rapid application design and can be used on any platform that supports Java. In this lab you will have an opportunity to write Visage applications that deploy to and run on Android mobile devices. No prior experience with Android or Visage development is required.

Java: Trends

Jeff Genender (Savoir Technologies)
Learn how to get involved in open source and learn the Open Source Way(tm). Topic covers the tools and methods of opensource, how to use this methodology at your work place, and maybe even get paid to develop opensource.
Manfred Moser (simpligility technologies inc.)
The Android SDK is open source and developed transparently. Although not well known, this is just the tip of the iceberg. There is a huge variety of development, test and build tools available. You can reuse some existing Java libraries and will find that more and more Android specific libraries are being created and used. Get a good overview and see what the future might bring.
Dalibor Topic (Oracle, Corp.)
In this session you'll learn about Oracle’s strategy for and inner workings of OpenJDK, the community where the development of open source implementations of the Java Plaform, Standard Edition takes place.
Patrick Curran (Java Community Process), Bruno Souza (SouJava)
Learn how the Java Community Process is structured and how Java standards are developed.
Greg Luck (Terracotta)
Presentation: Theory of Caching Presentation [ZIP]
This supplies the theory behind caching and introduces CAP theorem, N * Problem, SOR Coherency Problem, and the tradeoffs made by cache designers, and much more.
Toby Crawley (RedHat, Inc.)
The power of enterprise Java is now available through the expressiveness of Ruby. More and more projects are suited to new technologies and frameworks such as Ruby on Rails. Using TorqueBox, a team's members can leverage their knowledge, investments, skills, and trust in Java while exploring the cutting edge of new development models.

Java: Client

Bruce Snyder (SpringSource/VMware)
If you use ActiveMQ, chances are you have run into some problems for which there don't seem to be easy answers. This session examines some common questions from developers using ActiveMQ and provides explanations and solutions.
Zigurd Mednieks (Surfaceable.com)
One theme of Programming Android is that Android is now client Java. Client Java is what every Java coder started with when they start learning Java, but then, when it gets down to working for a living, it's all server Java now. So you have millions of coders who are primed for a successful client Java, and many of them work in enterprise IT. How will Android impact the work of Java coders?
Arun Gupta (Oracle)
GlassFish 3.1 adds support for clustering, high availability, and centralized administration. It provides a RESTful interface to administration, allows SSH-based provisioning, application-scoped resources. This talk will guide through the features introduced in GlassFish 3.1 that allows you to easily deploy and manage your Java EE 6 applications in a multi-instance cluster.
Joonas Lehtinen (Vaadin Ltd)
Vaadin Framework provides a desktop-like programming model on the server for creating Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) in plain Java - without the need for HTML, XML, plug-ins or JavaScript. In this session, one of the core Vaadin developers lays out the key concepts of the server-side RIA development model and shows how to build an application with Vaadin ground up.

Java: Server

Arun Gupta (Oracle)
Java EE 6 is an extreme makeover from previous versions and allows to author web applications using light-weight and easy-to-use APIs and tools. This demo-intensive workshop will introduce attendees to Java EE 6 technologies and how it can help them build a web application very easily using IDEs.
Les Hazlewood (Katasoft, Inc.)
Securing your applications can be a painful and confusing process, but it doesn't have to be. Apache Shiro simplifies all aspects of application security without sacrificing power or flexibility. Les Hazlewood, Apache Shiro PMC Chair, will explain all of Shiro's core features and demonstrate how to easily secure your own application- from small mobile to large enterprise applications.

Keynote

Jim Zemlin (The Linux Foundation)
On the eve of Linux’ 20th anniversary, Jim Zemlin invites the OSCON audience into his "Bizarro World” of 2011. The world of computing has been turned upside down. Microsoft’s stock is down. They now are filing anti-trust suits, not being the subject of them. Heck, Microsoft is even contributing code to Linux. And for good reason.
Adrian Cockcroft (Battery)
Keynote by Adrian Cockcroft, Cloud Architect, Netflix.
Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
Our brains are not-at-all suited for modern life, and are plagued by a raft of bugs and unwanted features that we've been unable to remove. Join us in a tour of some of the most amusing bugs and exploits wetware has to offer.
Gianugo Rabellino (Microsoft)
The world is changing, and so is Microsoft. We are continuing down the path of even greater openness and interoperability in new ways . . . not just in development, but rising to meet the challenges and opportunities of the cloud and becoming flexible and nimble in the world of mobile.
Benjamin Black (Boundary)
Keynote by Benjamin Black, Co-founder, fast_ip.
Brian Fitzpatrick (Google, Inc.)
Keynote by Brian Fitzpatrick, Engineering Manager, Google, Inc.
Dan Melton (Code for America)
Code for America is a new type of public service for geeks to leverage their engineering skills to bring open source practices to communities across America. We'll talk about the growing geek corps and the challenges of leveraging each other's work in building our digital communities.
Dwight Merriman (10gen)
Much has been made of scalability as a driver for choosing a database, but the choice of a database influences much more than the scaling architecture. Different database choices drive different data models which in turn influence the development process.
Gabe Zichermann (Gamification.Co & Gamification Summit)
Creating engaging user experiences in software have become the mantra of businesses big and small - but what about open source? Do we do enough user-centric design and are we creating the kind of long-term user engagement we want? What are the challenges for open source advocates and developers to building truly engaging experiences and how can gamification make open-everywhere a reality?
John Graham-Cumming (CloudFlare)
This talk tells the behind-the-scenes story of the apology campaign complete with source code, tips on dealing with the old-school media, how Twitter helped and didn't, and a call for people who want to change the world to be "reasonably unreasonable" because nothing ever gets done by the reasonable.
Tom Quisel (OkCupid)
Dive into the distributed system that powers OkCupid’s match searches. Learn how we use C++, event-based programming, and SSDs to solve problems that crop up when building a high performance, high availability distributed system.
Eri Gentry (BioCurious)
Join Eri Gentry, founder of BioCurious, the world’s first “hackerspace for biology” on a journey from garage biology to community lab.
Ariel Waldman (Spacehack.org)
From launching robots into space to discovering distant galaxies: how people are creating open source space exploration and hacking science.
Fred Trotter (FredTrotter.com)
Open Source software will power a new Internet layer, the Health Internet, which will finally make healthcare data liquid. The Health Internet will finally change healthcare the same way the Internet changed everything else; better, faster, cheaper.
Josh Bloch (Google)
In my technical presentation, I'll be discussing all of the changes to the Java programming language since its inception. In this this keynote, I'll focus my attention on the starting point: I'll present my candidates for the best and worst features in the platform as it was originally released (JDK 1.0), and explain the reasoning behind my choices.
Joe Darcy (Oracle)
Come hear a lively overview of the new features in JDK 7, including the language changes of Project Coin, the filesystem and other I/O features from NIO.2, and the new invokedyamic JVM instruction.
Karen Sandler (GNOME Foundation)
Keynote by Karen Sandler, Executive Director, GNOME Foundation.
Brian Aker (HP)
We love data, and today we generate data in astronomical amounts. When we hit save on a document, snap a photo, or fill out a form online, we want to know that this data will persist, and we want to know that we can share, access, or reference it in the future. For any meaningful use, we need to how data relates to other data.
The 7th Annual O’Reilly Open Source Award winners will be announced.
Steven G. Harris (Oracle)
Mystified as to how Oracle’s decisions on open source fit together? Stop looking at your crystal ball and get insight into how Oracle views open source and the role Java plays in the developer community. Find out where Oracle sees Java heading and how you can navigate the best path as an open source Java developer and decision-maker to participate in moving Java forward.
Jono Bacon (XPRIZE Foundation)
In this new keynote, Jono Bacon, author of The Art of Community (O'Reilly), founder of the Community Leadership Summit and award-winning Community Manager for the global Ubuntu community, talks about the new opportunities and challenges we face in understanding the art and science of community leadership.
Raffi Krikorian (Twitter)
Keynote by Raffi Krikorian, developer, Twitter.
Steve Yegge (Google)
It's 2021. You have a petabyte drive on your keychain, your startup company leases bulk cloud storage by the exabyte, and you have a million cores for data crunching. You even can have your own copy of the entire world's public semantic data. What do you do with it? If you're not sure yet, I've got plenty of ideas for you.
Patrick Curran (Java Community Process)
Presentation: Who Needs Standards Presentation [PDF]
In this keynote Patrick will discuss the history of standards, the role that they play in the modern world, and the way in which Java standards are developed through the JCP. He will explain how Java developers can get involved in the standards-developing process, and the benefits of doing so.
Martin Odersky (Typesafe)
Today's world of parallel and distributed computing poses hard new challenges for software development. A rapidly increasing number of developers now have to deal with races, deadlocks, non-determinism, and we are ill-equipped to do so. How can we keep things simple, in spite of the complexity of the underlying runtimes?

Event

John Mertic (SugarCRM)
SugarCRM is designed as a Rapid Application Development platform. In this half day tutorial you'll learn how to build a business application on the Open Source SugarCRM platform.

Products & Services

In this session, we'll cover what is the BlackBerry WebWorks platform, why should you care and is it really open sourced? We'll also cover Research In Motions (RIM) embracing of open source technology, participation in open source technology and where is RIM going with open source.
Derek Collison (VMware)
This talk will cover the design and building of the distributed architecture of Cloud Foundry.

Presentation

Rod Whitby (WebOS Internals)
In this session one of the most passionate and knowledgeable members of the homebrew community will provide an overview of the WebOS Internals open source homebrew development organization. Rod Whitby takes us on a tour of the architecture, operation, and ecosystem to show how to develop third-party webOS apps, patches, themes, and kernels.
Eric Sink (SourceGear)
Veracity is an open source Distributed Version Control System. This session will provide an overview and explain how Veracity is different from similar tools like Mercurial and Git.
Asanka Abeysinghe (WSO2, Inc.)
Presentation: Join The Lean Wave Presentation [PDF]
Lean and pragmatic approach to build enterprise solutions using WSO2 middleware platform.
Oren Teich (Heroku)
Procfile is a new open source way of defining the process formation that defines an application. Heroku takes advantage of Procfile to offer an incredible flexible PaaS. Oren will take you through the major features of Procfiles and how Heroku uses it, including illustrating the flexibility, visibility and confidence that you can achieve with Heroku.
Brian Clark (Objectivity)
Learn how developers and application architects can incorporate graph DB technologies alongside other data stores and open source components to solve the next wave of large-scale problems such as relationship analytics, traversal of complex relationships and connecting the dots in Big Data.
Lars Thalmann (Oracle), Johannes Schlüter (ORACLE)
Under Oracle's stewardship, MySQL continues to innovate and thrive. Join Oracle's MySQL experts and learn the latest MySQL developments, including product releases, integrations and the roadmap. You'll hear directly from key development engineers in the MySQL replication and connectors team, so don't miss this opportunity!
James Falkner (liferay.com)
Recently, the hype around NoSQL DB design has reached fever pitch. At the same time, the hype around dynamic data modeling, web based form design, and dynamic schema design (a.k.a. "creating stuff online and dynamically with no coding") has been increasing as well. In this session, see how Liferay Portal uses MongoDB to implement highly scalable dynamic data for collaboration and social features.
Jason Cannavale (Rackspace)
In this workshop, attendees should expect to gain a clear understanding of OpenStack, its capabilities and use cases, learn best practices for deploying and administering OpenStack, and experience a live demo.
Marcello Lioy (Qualcomm Innovation Center Inc.)
Peer-to-peer technology is at a crossroads, and Qualcomm’s AllJoyn initiative is taking it to the next level by enabling ad hoc, proximity-based, device-to-device messaging and gaming – without discriminating between OS or hardware. You’ll leave this presentation feeling energized about the increasingly diverse nature by which open source technology allows us to develop and communicate.
Joseph George (Hewlett-Packard (HP)), Rob Hirschfeld (Dell, Inc.)
In Prying Open the Cloud with Dell Crowbar and OpenStack, attendees will: find out about one of the fastest ways to stand up an OpenStack cloud, learn about the development, implementation and operation of Dell Crowbar, and hear how one company planned and implemented an OpenStack cloud for its business
John Newton (Alfresco Software), Jeff Potts (Alfresco Software)
This informative and interactive session will explore the open source alternative to Microsoft Sharepoint.

Data: Products and Services

Harry Heymann (foursquare)
Presentation: external link
A talk about how to scale foursquare using MongoDB and Scala.

Node Day

IT Leaders Summit

Henrik Ingo (10gen)
Studying our most popular open source projects we find that 9 are significantly larger, roughly 10x, than any of the other projects. These "XtraLarge" projects have some notable characteristics that are interesting to anyone wanting to grow his/her open source project to similar magnitude and importance. Ex: All are collaborative non-profit community projects, with modular software architectures.
David Mirza (Subgraph)
Security and open source have a history that goes back to an era long before computers. The story begins with 19th century linguist Auguste Kerckhoffs and his principle that security isn't found in obscurity. We will cover the intertwined and lesser-known history of security and open source from then to now, with his big idea as a guiding principle, making a compelling argument for open source.