Sponsors

  • Google
  • JBoss
  • OpenShift
  • Oracle
  • VMware
  • WSO2

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the convention, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com

Download the OSCON Java Sponsor/Exhibitor Prospectus

Media Partner Opportunities

For information on trade opportunities with O'Reilly conferences or contact mediapartners@ oreilly.com

Press and Media

For media-related inquiries, contact Maureen Jennings at maureen@oreilly.com

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Contact Us

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OSCON: Java 2011 Schedule

Below are the confirmed and scheduled talks (schedule subject to change).

Customize Your Own Schedule

Create your own OSCON: Java schedule using the personal scheduler function. Mark the keynotes, workshops, sessions, and events you want to attend by clicking on the calendar icon [calendar icon] next to each listing. Then click on "personal schedule" below and get your own customized schedule generated.

A105
Add JRuby: Pushing the Java Platform Further to your personal schedule
10:40am JRuby: Pushing the Java Platform Further Charles Nutter (Engine Yard, Inc)
Add Testing in Scala to your personal schedule
11:30am Testing in Scala Daniel Hinojosa (evolutionnext.com)
Add Seven Things You'll Love About Grails to your personal schedule
1:30pm Seven Things You'll Love About Grails Tim Berglund (GitHub)
Add Clojure: Lisp for the Real World to your personal schedule
2:20pm Clojure: Lisp for the Real World Stuart Sierra (Relevance, Inc.)
Add Coding over Configuration to your personal schedule
4:20pm Coding over Configuration Robert "r0ml" Lefkowitz (Sharewave)
A106
Add Theory of Caching to your personal schedule
10:40am Theory of Caching Greg Luck (Terracotta)
Add Polyglot Persistence for Java Developers - Moving Out of the Relational Comfort Zone to your personal schedule
11:30am Polyglot Persistence for Java Developers - Moving Out of the Relational Comfort Zone Chris Richardson (Chris Richardson Consulting, Inc)
Add Functional Thinking to your personal schedule
1:30pm Functional Thinking Neal Ford (ThoughtWorks)
Add Implement Your Own JVM Compiler  to your personal schedule
2:20pm Implement Your Own JVM Compiler Ian Dees (Tektronix)
Add Java Standards Annoyances to your personal schedule
3:30pm Java Standards Annoyances Ben Evans (jClarity), Martijn Verburg (jClarity)
Add Seven Habits of Highly Effective Jenkins Users to your personal schedule
4:20pm Seven Habits of Highly Effective Jenkins Users Andrew Bayer (Cloudera, Inc.)
B110-111
Add Building Better Clients with Spring to your personal schedule
10:40am Building Better Clients with Spring Josh Long (Pivotal)
Add Android is Client Java to your personal schedule
11:30am Android is Client Java Zigurd Mednieks (Surfaceable.com)
Add Java Puzzlers—Scraping the Bottom of the Barrel to your personal schedule
1:30pm Java Puzzlers—Scraping the Bottom of the Barrel Josh Bloch (Google), Bob Lee (Square Inc. )
Add Introducing the Eclipse Rich Client Platform 4.x to your personal schedule
2:20pm Introducing the Eclipse Rich Client Platform 4.x Wayne Beaton (The Eclipse Foundation)
Add TorqueBox: The Beauty of Ruby with the Power of Java to your personal schedule
3:30pm TorqueBox: The Beauty of Ruby with the Power of Java Toby Crawley (RedHat, Inc.)
Add The Future Java Developer to your personal schedule
4:20pm The Future Java Developer Fabiane Nardon (RBS Group), Bruno Souza (SouJava)
A107/108
Add The State of JDK and OpenJDK to your personal schedule
11:30am The State of JDK and OpenJDK Joe Darcy (Oracle)
Add Above the Clouds: Introducing Akka to your personal schedule
1:30pm Above the Clouds: Introducing Akka Martin Odersky (Typesafe)
Add Apache TomEE - Tomcat with a Kick to your personal schedule
4:20pm Apache TomEE - Tomcat with a Kick David Blevins (Apache Software Foundation)
Add Welcome to your personal schedule
9:00am Plenary
Room: Oregon Ballroom 201/202
Welcome Laurel Ruma (O'Reilly Media, Inc.), Stephen Chin (Oracle)
Add Open Source, Java, and Oracle – Cracking the Code to your personal schedule
9:10am Plenary
Room: Oregon Ballroom 201/202
Open Source, Java, and Oracle – Cracking the Code Steven G. Harris (Oracle)
Add Twitter: From Ruby on Rails to the JVM to your personal schedule
9:30am Plenary
Room: Oregon Ballroom 201/202
Twitter: From Ruby on Rails to the JVM Raffi Krikorian (Twitter)
Add Working Hard to Keep It Simple to your personal schedule
9:45am Plenary
Room: Oregon Ballroom 201/202
Working Hard to Keep It Simple Martin Odersky (Typesafe)
Add JDK 7 in a Nutshell to your personal schedule
10:00am Plenary
Room: Oregon Ballroom 201/202
JDK 7 in a Nutshell Joe Darcy (Oracle)
Add Ignite OSCON to your personal schedule
7:00pm Event
Room: Oregon Ballroom
Ignite OSCON
10:10am Morning Break
Room: Exhibit Hall C
12:10pm Lunch
Room: Exhibit Hall C
3:00pm Afternoon Break
Room: Exhibit Hall C
Add Monday Birds of a Feather Sessions to your personal schedule
9:00pm Plenary
Room: See BoF Schedule for Locations
Monday Birds of a Feather Sessions
Add Android Happy Hour to your personal schedule
5:00pm Event
Room: Gather (Double Tree Hotel bar)
Android Happy Hour
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Java: JVM
JRuby: Pushing the Java Platform Further
Charles Nutter (Engine Yard, Inc)
JRuby is just a Ruby implementation for the JVM, right? Wrong! JRuby has gone well beyond other language implementations by supporting arbitrarily-encoded strings, native library calls, reloadable applications, and much more. This talk will explore how JRuby is pushing the JVM and Java platform in new directions, and how you can take advantage of this new power.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Java: JVM
Testing in Scala
Daniel Hinojosa (evolutionnext.com)
The best way to learn a new language happens to be the best way to program - with a test. Learn test-driven development in Scala with this introductory presentation to some of Scala's most popular tools like SBT, Specs, ScalaTest, Borrachio, and Scala Check.
1:30pm-2:10pm (40m) Java: JVM
Seven Things You'll Love About Grails
Tim Berglund (GitHub)
In the bewildering array of Java and JVM frameworks, Grails is emerging as a standard choice in environments ranging from startups to the enterprise. It's a full-stack solution build on rock-solid components, fully relying on convention over configuration, and using the best application language the JVM has yet seen: Groovy. This is the place to be for web apps on the JVM.
2:20pm-3:00pm (40m) Java: JVM
Clojure: Lisp for the Real World
Stuart Sierra (Relevance, Inc.)
Meet Clojure, a new dynamic language for the JVM, with innovative ideas for state management and concurrency.
3:30pm-4:10pm (40m) Java: JVM
Future-proofing Collections: From Mutable to Persistent to Parallel
Martin Odersky (Typesafe)
Multicore processors are on every desk now. How are we going to make use of the extra power they provide? A promising solution is parallel programming using collections. Programing by transforming and aggregating collections is simple and powerful, and can be parallelized well. In this talk I will describe the design principles behind the Scala collections framework which implements these ideas.
4:20pm-5:00pm (40m) Java: Craftsmanship
Coding over Configuration
Robert "r0ml" Lefkowitz (Sharewave)
Many Java frameworks and servers depend on a maze of twisty XML files wherein many get lost. In a system where the source code is unavailable, such an approach allows for customization. But when you can modify the source, the configuration files are unnecessary. After all, you can make the code do what you want. And it is less verbose and more understandable.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Java: Trends
Theory of Caching
Greg Luck (Terracotta)
This supplies the theory behind caching and introduces CAP theorem, N * Problem, SOR Coherency Problem, and the tradeoffs made by cache designers, and much more.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Java: JVM
Polyglot Persistence for Java Developers - Moving Out of the Relational Comfort Zone
Chris Richardson (Chris Richardson Consulting, Inc)
Covers the benefits and drawbacks of using NoSQL databases. Uses a use case from the book POJOS in Action to compare and contrast popular NoSQL databases – Redis, SimpleDB, MongoDB, and Cassandra.
1:30pm-2:10pm (40m) Java: Craftsmanship
Functional Thinking
Neal Ford (ThoughtWorks)
Learning the syntax of a new language is easy, but learning to think under a different paradigm is hard. This session helps you transition from a Java writing imperative programmer to a functional programmer, using Java, Clojure and Scala for examples.
2:20pm-3:00pm (40m)
Implement Your Own JVM Compiler
Ian Dees (Tektronix)
Writing a compiler used to be a big deal. Nowadays, we have an abundance of good tools to help us: parsing frameworks, bytecode generators, and rich runtimes. In this introductory talk, we'll see how to design and implement a rudimentary compiler in about half an hour for a simple programming language on the JVM.
3:30pm-4:10pm (40m) Java: Trends
Java Standards Annoyances
Ben Evans (jClarity) et al
Oracle is evil!! Java and open source are doomed! The standards body is a zombie! .NET is going to eat our lunch. Larry's planning on turning you into pet food for his Velociraptors. You've all heard these types of comments and many Java developers feel out of the loop and powerless to make a difference.
4:20pm-5:00pm (40m) Java: Craftsmanship
Seven Habits of Highly Effective Jenkins Users
Andrew Bayer (Cloudera, Inc.)
A look at using Jenkins for continuous integration, focusing on three different use cases at three different companies, along with a general update on the state of the project.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Java: Client
Building Better Clients with Spring
Josh Long (Pivotal)
Today's users expect their applications and data to follow them beyond the web-browser as they go mobile, watch TV, and work with their local operating system environment. In this talk, Josh Long introduces common ways to build these applications and how Spring can help simplify things both on the server side and client side.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Java: Client
Android is Client Java
Zigurd Mednieks (Surfaceable.com)
One theme of Programming Android is that Android is now client Java. Client Java is what every Java coder started with when they start learning Java, but then, when it gets down to working for a living, it's all server Java now. So you have millions of coders who are primed for a successful client Java, and many of them work in enterprise IT. How will Android impact the work of Java coders?
1:30pm-2:10pm (40m) Java: Trends
Java Puzzlers—Scraping the Bottom of the Barrel
Josh Bloch (Google) et al
How can they do it? How can Josh Bloch and Bob keep coming up with such great programming puzzlers year after year? They can't! In this, the eighth installment of the perennial crowd pleaser, Click and Hack the Type-It brothers are truly scraping the bottom of the barrel. But some of the dregs they come up with may still astonish, delight, and educate.
2:20pm-3:00pm (40m) Java: Client
Introducing the Eclipse Rich Client Platform 4.x
Wayne Beaton (The Eclipse Foundation)
The Eclipse Rich Client Platform (RCP) is a run-time platform with first-class development support for delivering Java technology-based applications. Far more than just a widget toolkit, RCP is rich client middleware that provides a comprehensive framework for building, deploying, and running applications that are modular, extensible, and updatable.
3:30pm-4:10pm (40m) Java: Trends
TorqueBox: The Beauty of Ruby with the Power of Java
Toby Crawley (RedHat, Inc.)
The power of enterprise Java is now available through the expressiveness of Ruby. More and more projects are suited to new technologies and frameworks such as Ruby on Rails. Using TorqueBox, a team's members can leverage their knowledge, investments, skills, and trust in Java while exploring the cutting edge of new development models.
4:20pm-5:00pm (40m) Java: Trends
The Future Java Developer
Fabiane Nardon (RBS Group) et al
New languages, work environments, technologies, and devices. Clouds roll in bringing new rules. Is open really the source of the future? If the future is now, what comes later? Java developers thread on a fine line between working standards and bleeding edge science-fiction experiments. What are the possibilities for the future?
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Java: Client
GlassFish 3.1: Deploying Your Java EE 6 Applications
Arun Gupta (Oracle)
GlassFish 3.1 adds support for clustering, high availability, and centralized administration. It provides a RESTful interface to administration, allows SSH-based provisioning, application-scoped resources. This talk will guide through the features introduced in GlassFish 3.1 that allows you to easily deploy and manage your Java EE 6 applications in a multi-instance cluster.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Java: JVM
The State of JDK and OpenJDK
Joe Darcy (Oracle)
Starting in 2006, portions of the JDK code base were released under open source, starting the OpenJDK effort. Today OpenJDK 6 derived binaries are found in most Linux distributions and OpenJDK 7 is being used for the reference implementation of Java SE 7. Learn about the ongoing work in OpenJDK 6, hear about the new features in JDK 7, and get an overview of the functionality expected in JDK 8.
1:30pm-2:10pm (40m) Java: Cloud
Above the Clouds: Introducing Akka
Martin Odersky (Typesafe)
Akka is using the Actors together with STM to create a unified runtime and programming model for scaling both UP (multi-core) and OUT (grid/cloud). Akka provides location transparency by abstracting away both these tangents of scalability by turning them into an ops task. This gives the Akka runtime freedom to do adaptive automatic load-balancing, cluster rebalancing, replication & partitioning
2:20pm-3:00pm (40m) Java: Trends
The Ghost in the Virtual Machine: A Reference to References
Bob Lee (Square Inc. )
Ever wondered whether you should use a weak reference or a phantom reference? If you answered "yes" or "phantom who?," this is the talk for you. Walk in with a working knowledge of the language, and walk out an expert in references, referents, reclamation and other garbage collection necromancy.
3:30pm-4:10pm (40m) Java: Cloud
Know Your Cirrus From Your Cumulus: How Clouds Differ Beyond Cost And Speed And How That Affects You
Andrew Phillips (jclouds)
As adoption of cloud platforms grows, both in dedicated and "mixed-use" configurations, the original Cloud 1.0 vision of "run anything, anywhere" has been extended and refined to cover a number of considerations that are turning out to be essential across various cloud usage models.
4:20pm-5:00pm (40m) Java: Server
Apache TomEE - Tomcat with a Kick
David Blevins (Apache Software Foundation)
Apache TomEE, pronounced "Tommy", is a simple all-Apache stack aimed at Java EE 6 Web Profile certification where Tomcat is top dog. Built on a plain Tomcat zip file, Apache TomEE fills out the missing pieces in a way that is simple, to-the-point, and focused on the singular task of delivering the Java EE 6 Web Profile in a minimalist fashion. Get more from Tomcat without giving up anything.
9:00am-9:10am (10m)
Welcome
Laurel Ruma (O'Reilly Media, Inc.) et al
Opening remarks by the OSCON Java program chairs, Laurel Ruma and Stephen Chin.
9:10am-9:30am (20m) Keynote
Open Source, Java, and Oracle – Cracking the Code
Steven G. Harris (Oracle)
Mystified as to how Oracle’s decisions on open source fit together? Stop looking at your crystal ball and get insight into how Oracle views open source and the role Java plays in the developer community. Find out where Oracle sees Java heading and how you can navigate the best path as an open source Java developer and decision-maker to participate in moving Java forward.
9:30am-9:45am (15m) Keynote
Twitter: From Ruby on Rails to the JVM
Raffi Krikorian (Twitter)
Keynote by Raffi Krikorian, developer, Twitter.
9:45am-10:00am (15m) Keynote
Working Hard to Keep It Simple
Martin Odersky (Typesafe)
Today's world of parallel and distributed computing poses hard new challenges for software development. A rapidly increasing number of developers now have to deal with races, deadlocks, non-determinism, and we are ill-equipped to do so. How can we keep things simple, in spite of the complexity of the underlying runtimes?
10:00am-10:10am (10m) Keynote
JDK 7 in a Nutshell
Joe Darcy (Oracle)
Come hear a lively overview of the new features in JDK 7, including the language changes of Project Coin, the filesystem and other I/O features from NIO.2, and the new invokedyamic JVM instruction.
7:00pm-9:00pm (2h) Event
Ignite OSCON
If you had five minutes on stage what would you say? What if you only got 20 slides and they rotated automatically after 15 seconds? Would you pitch a project? Launch a web site? Teach a hack? We’re going to find out when we conduct our third Ignite event at OSCON.
10:10am-10:40am (30m)
Break: Morning Break
12:10pm-1:30pm (1h 20m)
Break: Lunch
3:00pm-3:30pm (30m)
Break: Afternoon Break
9:00pm-11:00pm (2h) Event
Monday Birds of a Feather Sessions
Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions provide face to face exposure to those interested in the same projects and concepts. BoFs can be organized for individual projects or broader topics (best practices, open data, standards). BoFs are entirely up to you. We post your topic online and onsite and provide the space and time. You provide the engaging topic.
5:00pm-7:00pm (2h) Event
Android Happy Hour
Join other Android developers for happy hour at Gather in the Double Tree Hotel on Monday evening. Meet face-to-face and share experiences with other developers working on Android. The first 100 people there get a free drink ticket.