Sponsors

  • Microsoft
  • Nebula
  • Google
  • SugarCRM
  • Facebook
  • HP
  • Intel
  • Rackspace Hosting
  • WSO2
  • Alfresco
  • BlackBerry
  • CUBRID
  • Dell
  • eBay
  • Heroku
  • InfiniteGraph
  • JBoss
  • LeaseWeb
  • Liferay
  • Media Temple, Inc.
  • OpenShift
  • Oracle
  • Percona
  • Puppet Labs
  • Qualcomm Innovation Center, Inc.
  • Rentrak
  • Silicon Mechanics
  • SoftLayer Technologies, Inc.
  • SourceGear
  • Urban Airship
  • Vertica
  • VMware
  • (mt) Media Temple, Inc.

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the convention, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com

Download the OSCON Sponsor/Exhibitor Prospectus

Contact Us

View a complete list of OSCON contacts

Going Green with Linux

Matthew Garrett (Nebula)
Cloud Computing
Location: D139/140
Average rating: ****.
(4.20, 5 ratings)

It’s a connected world. A huge proportion of potential customers carry devices that constantly talk to machines around the world. People wake up and expect the latest news to be available to them in less time than it takes to pour a cup of coffee. A website that’s down is no longer an inconvenience, it’s a potentially company-ending disaster. Satisfying the demands of users means multiple data centers with racks of machines. What it’s easy to forget is that every machine in every rack is contributing to our energy consumption.

It’s a given that we can’t wean people off their desire for data. But how can we reduce the costs associated with it? This presentation covers the technological advances in the Linux kernel that put it ahead of the competition in terms of power consumption and reduced cost of ownership, along with discussion of future advances that’ll mean companies will no longer ask whether they can afford to move to Linux – but whether they can afford not to.

Photo of Matthew Garrett

Matthew Garrett

Nebula

Matthew Garrett is a Linux kernel developer, firmware wrangler and securer of the cloud. He has seen things that you wouldn’t believe, most of which are hidden inside your computer.

The packets are coming from inside your firmware. Run. Now.