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The Expressiveness of Go

Rob Pike (Google, Inc.)
Programming
Location: Portland 255
Average rating: ****.
(4.06, 18 ratings)

Go is not a small language but it is a simple one. By “simple” I mean
that it is built upon a small number of ideas that combine
orthogonally to generate power. Go may have fewer features than most
mainstream languages but in expressiveness I argue it is ahead.
Orthogonality lets elements be combined without unpleasant surprises.
Simplicity makes Go easy to understand, fast to use and fast to
compile.

This talk will be of interest to anyone who wants to learn more about Go,
from neophytes to experienced Gophers.

Photo of Rob Pike

Rob Pike

Google, Inc.

Rob Pike is a Distinguished Engineer at Google, Inc. He works on distributed systems, data mining, programming languages, and software development tools. Before Google, Rob was a member of the Computing Sciences Research Center at Bell Labs, the lab that developed Unix. While there, he worked on computer graphics, user interfaces, languages, concurrent programming, and distributed systems. He was an architect of the Plan 9 and Inferno operating systems and is the co-author with Brian Kernighan of The Unix Programming Environment and The Practice of Programming. Other details of his life appear on line but vary in veracity.

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Comments

Yitzchak Scott-Thoennes
07/29/2011 10:51am PDT

Too much about what was removed as compared to C or added from other languages; not enough about features that are unique to go.