OSCON Healthcare Technology Call for Participation

Call closed 11:59pm 04/17/2010 PDT.

OSCON 2010 Healthcare Technology – Accepting Proposals – Submit Yours Today!

O’Reilly Media invites you to lead conference sessions in open source healthcare technology at the O’Reilly Open Source Convention 2010. OSCON will be held July 19-23, 2010 in Portland, Oregon.

IT in healthcare is at a turning point, and open source is driving change and collaboration across the industry. We want to hear about the key projects, APIs, open standards and technological challenges in healthcare as it takes steps towards a radically different future.

Submit a proposal — fill out the submission form.

Participants at the O’Reilly Open Source Convention want to hear about real-world scenarios using open source and what’s new. Include in your proposal as much detail about the planned presentation as possible. The more we know about what you plan to present, the better. Proposals which are vague or cover too much material are unlikely to be accepted. If you think your proposal covers too much of a topic, consider submitting two proposals which split the material into different sessions.

If you are one or more of the following:

  • Designer or implementor
  • Healthcare professional
  • Program administrator
  • Government policymaker
  • Researcher
  • IT manager or CxO
  • Entrepreneur

If so, you are invited to submit a proposal with the opportunity to lead conference sessions at OSCON 2010. OSCON will be held July 19-23, 2010 in Portland, OR.

Read tips for submitting a proposal

Some of the topics we’re on the lookout for the 2010 Healthcare Technology track are:

  • Health data exchange projects like NHIN/CONNECT, Kantara, and hData
  • Open standards for health data, and supporting software
  • Mobile devices for clinical data input
  • Health IT for disaster relief and developing nations.
  • Electronic health/medical records management.
  • Public health projects – symptomic surveillance, medical trials, etc.
  • Patient-centered health data projects, from PHR systems to mobile apps.
  • Securing health systems.
  • Understanding the “alphabet soup” of healthcare technology standards and organizations.

You’ll be asked to include the following information for your proposal:

  • Proposed title
  • Overview and extended descriptions of the presentation: main idea, sub topics, conclusion
  • Suggested track
  • Speaker(s): expertise and summary biography

Proposals will be considered for 40-minute presentations.

We also ask you to be clear about the experience and knowledge level of the audience that you are targeting: novice, intermediate, or expert. Keep in mind that we look for a balance of all three experience levels when determining the conference schedule.

Limited speaking opportunities are also available through conference sponsorship. Contact Sharon Cordesse at (707) 827-7065 or scordesse@oreilly.com for more information.

Some tips for writing a good proposal for a good talk:

Help us understand why your presentation is the right one for OSCON.

  • Keep it free of marketing: talk about open source software, but not about a commercial product—the audience should be able to use and improve the things you discuss without paying money
  • Keep the audience in mind: they’re technical, professional, and already pretty smart
  • Clearly identify the level of the talk: is it for beginners to the topic, or for gurus? What knowledge should people have when they come to the presentation?
  • Give it a simple and straightforward title or name: fancy and clever titles or descriptions make it harder for people (committee and attendees) to figure out what you’re really talking about
  • Limit the scope of the talk: in 45 minutes, you won’t be able to cover Everything about Widget Framework X. Instead, pick a useful aspect, or a particular technique, or walk through a simple program
  • Pages of code are unreadable: mere mortals can deal with code a line at a time. Sometimes three lines at a time. A full page of code can’t be read when it’s projected, and it can’t be comprehended by the audience
  • Explain why people will want to attend: is the framework gaining traction? Is the app critical to modern systems? Will they learn how to deploy it, program it, or just what it is?
  • Let us know in your proposal notes whether you can give all the talks you submitted proposals for

Additional Tips for Submitting a Proposal

Please keep in mind that this event is by and for professionals. Our participants expect that all presentations and supporting materials will be respectful, inclusive, and “safe for work.”

  • Be authentic! Your peers need original presentation ideas that focus real-world scenarios, relevant examples, and knowledge transfer
  • Include as much detail about the planned presentation as possible. The more we know about what you plan to present and why it matters, the better. The longer the talk you’re proposing, the more detail you should provide
  • If you are proposing a panel, tell us who else would be on it
  • If you feel this is something that hasn’t been covered at OSCON before, let us know
  • Be sure to let us know if you are going to have a release
  • Keep it free of marketing and sales
  • Keep the audience in mind: they’re technical, professional, and already pretty smart
  • Clearly identify the level of the talk: is it for beginners to the topic, or for gurus? What knowledge should people have when they come to the presentation?
  • Give it a simple and straightforward title or name: Clever or inappropriate titles and/or descriptions make it harder for people (committee and attendees) to figure out what you’re really talking about
  • Context is important. If your presentation is about something truly ground-breaking, earth-shattering, and new, it will be helpful to the reviewers if you describe it in terms of things that attendees might already know of
  • Limit the scope of the talk: in 45 minutes, you won’t be able to cover Everything about Widget Framework X. Instead, pick a useful aspect, or a particular technique, or walk through a simple program
  • Explain why people will want to attend: is the framework gaining traction? Is the app critical to modern systems? Will they learn how to deploy it, program it, or just what it is?
  • Let us know in your proposal notes whether you can give all the talks you submitted proposals for
  • Warmed-over talks from some conference circuit are less likely to be appealing. The conference has a limited number of slots, and if attendees can see the same talk somewhere else, why should they come see you at this one? If you speak at a lot of events, be sure to note why this presentation is different
  • Don’t assume that your company’s name buys you cred. If you’re talking about something important that you have specific knowledge of because of what your company does, spell that out in the description
  • Present something relevant. If you’re presenting a new way to do something that others have been doing for a decade or more, you need an angle on it that’s fresh or an explanation for why it’s important now. The hot things are hot, the cold things are cold, but there are interesting problems in almost everything. One of your challenges as a proposer is to demonstrate that you understand that attendees might need an extra reason to pay attention to something that they might otherwise think of as “settled”
  • Avoid taking a scatter-shot approach to proposals if you submit more than one or two. Be focused, have something important to say on a worthwhile topic, and sell the topic (not just yourself)

Other resources:

Resources

Here are some other resources that may help you write your proposal:

Important Dates

  • The submission deadline for all proposals is April 15, 2010.

Submit a proposal now!

  • Intel
  • Microsoft
  • Google
  • Facebook
  • Rackspace Hosting
  • (mt) Media Temple, Inc.
  • ActiveState
  • CommonPlaces
  • DB Relay
  • FireHost
  • GoDaddy
  • HP
  • HTSQL by Prometheus Research
  • Impetus Technologies Inc.
  • Infobright, Inc
  • JasperSoft
  • Kaltura
  • Marvell
  • Mashery
  • NorthScale, Inc.
  • Open Invention Network
  • OpSource
  • Oracle
  • Parallels
  • PayPal
  • Percona
  • Qualcomm Innovation Center, Inc.
  • Rhomobile
  • Schooner Information Technology
  • Silicon Mechanics
  • SourceGear
  • Symbian
  • VoltDB
  • WSO2
  • Linux Pro Magazine

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the conference, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com

Download the OSCON Sponsor/Exhibitor Prospectus

Media Partner Opportunities

Download the Media & Promotional Partner Brochure (PDF) for information on trade opportunities with O'Reilly conferences or contact mediapartners@ oreilly.com

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For media-related inquiries, contact Maureen Jennings at maureen@oreilly.com

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