Sponsors
  • Intel
  • Microsoft
  • Google
  • Sun Microsystems
  • BT
  • IBM
  • Yahoo! Inc.
  • Zimbra
  • Atlassian Software Systems
  • Disney
  • EnterpriseDB
  • Etelos
  • Ingres
  • JasperSoft
  • Kablink
  • Linagora
  • MindTouch
  • Mozilla Corporation
  • Novell, Inc.
  • Open Invention Network
  • OpSource
  • RightScale
  • Silicon Mechanics
  • Tenth Planet
  • Ticketmaster
  • Voiceroute
  • White Oak Technologies, Inc.
  • XAware
  • ZDNet

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the conference, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com.

Media Partner Opportunities

Download the Media & Promotional Partner Brochure (PDF) for more information on trade opportunities with O'Reilly conferences, or contact mediapartners@oreilly.com.

Press and Media

For media-related inquiries, contact Maureen Jennings at maureen@oreilly.com.

OSCON Newsletter

To stay abreast of conference news and to receive email notification when registration opens, please sign up for the OSCON newsletter (login required).

Contact Us

View a complete list of OSCON 2008 Contacts

OSCON 2008 Schedule

Below are the confirmed and scheduled talks at OSCON (schedule subject to change).

Portland 251
Add The Internet is an Ogre: Finding Art in the Software Architecture to your personal schedule
10:45am The Internet is an Ogre: Finding Art in the Software Architecture Terry Chay (Automattic, Inc. (WordPress))
Add PHP Taint Tool: It Ain't a Parser to your personal schedule
11:35am PHP Taint Tool: It Ain't a Parser Luke Welling ([Redacted])
Add Write Beautiful Code (in PHP) to your personal schedule
1:45pm Write Beautiful Code (in PHP) Laura Thomson (Mozilla Corporation)
Add Caching and Performance: Lessons from Facebook to your personal schedule
2:35pm Caching and Performance: Lessons from Facebook Lucas Nealan (Facebook)
Add The Google Open Source Update to your personal schedule
4:30pm The Google Open Source Update Chris DiBona (Google, Inc.), Leslie Hawthorn (Elasticsearch)
Add Give Your Site a Boost with memcached to your personal schedule
5:20pm Give Your Site a Boost with memcached Ben Ramsey (Moontoast)
Portland 252
Add Changing Education... Open Content, Open Hardware, Open Curricula to your personal schedule
10:45am Changing Education... Open Content, Open Hardware, Open Curricula Cliff Schmidt (Literacy Bridge), Danese Cooper (Open Source Hardware Association), Mark R. Shuttleworth (Canonical Ltd.), Derek Keats (The University of the Western Cape), Bobbi Kurshan (Curriki), David Wiley (Brigham Young University), Brian Behlendorf (CollabNet, Mozilla Foundation)
Add Metaprogramming in Ruby to your personal schedule
11:35am Metaprogramming in Ruby Brian Sam-Bodden (Integrallis Software, LLC.)
Add Code Reviews for Fun and Profit to your personal schedule
1:45pm Code Reviews for Fun and Profit Alex Martelli (Google)
Add A Critical View of OpenID to your personal schedule
2:35pm A Critical View of OpenID Jason Levitt (Spirit.io), Simon Willison (Self employed), Chris Messina (Google), Scott Kveton (Urban Airship, Inc.), Allen Tom (Yahoo! Inc. )
Add Open Source Community Antipatterns to your personal schedule
4:30pm Open Source Community Antipatterns Ted Leung (The Walt Disney Company)
Add An Open Source Project Called "Failure:" Community Antipatterns to Know and Avoid to your personal schedule
5:20pm An Open Source Project Called "Failure:" Community Antipatterns to Know and Avoid Josh Berkus (PostgreSQL Experts, Inc.), Shane Warden (O'Reilly Media), Ben Collins-Sussman (Google, Inc.), Brian Fitzpatrick (Google, Inc.), Karl Fogel (Open Tech Strategies, LLC)
Portland 255
Add Hydra: A Wireless Multihop Networking Testbed to your personal schedule
10:45am Hydra: A Wireless Multihop Networking Testbed Hyrum Wright (WANdisco, Inc.), Robert Grant (University of Texas at Austin)
Add Open Virtual Machine Tools to your personal schedule
11:35am Open Virtual Machine Tools Adar Dembo (VMware Inc.)
Add Subversion Worst Practices to your personal schedule
1:45pm Subversion Worst Practices Ben Collins-Sussman (Google, Inc.), Brian Fitzpatrick (Google, Inc.)
Add Measuring and Trends in Linux Kernel Quality to your personal schedule
2:35pm Measuring and Trends in Linux Kernel Quality Arjan van de Ven (Intel)
Add Shell Scripting Craftsmanship to your personal schedule
5:20pm Shell Scripting Craftsmanship Ray Smith (Portland General Electric)
Portland 256
Add Strawberry Perl: Achieving Win32 Platform Equality to your personal schedule
10:45am Strawberry Perl: Achieving Win32 Platform Equality Adam Kennedy (Corporate Express Australia)
Add Perl 5.10 for People Who Are Not (Totally) Insane to your personal schedule
11:35am Perl 5.10 for People Who Are Not (Totally) Insane Ricardo Signes (Pobox.com)
Add Perl 6 Update to your personal schedule
1:45pm Perl 6 Update Damian Conway (Thoughtstream), Larry Wall (The Wall Nuthouse)
Add Rakudo: Perl 6 on Parrot to your personal schedule
2:35pm Rakudo: Perl 6 on Parrot Patrick Michaud (pmichaud.com), Jerry Gay (Rakudo Consulting Group)
Add Moose: A Postmodern Object System for Perl 5 to your personal schedule
4:30pm Moose: A Postmodern Object System for Perl 5 Stevan Little (Infinity Interactive)
Add Barely Legal XXX Perl to your personal schedule
5:20pm Barely Legal XXX Perl Jos Boumans (Krux Digital)
D133
Add How to be Normal: A Guide for Developers to your personal schedule
10:45am How to be Normal: A Guide for Developers Mike Hillyer (Message Systems)
Add Lock Up Your Data to your personal schedule
11:35am Lock Up Your Data Josh Berkus (PostgreSQL Experts, Inc.)
Add The Australian Open Source Industry & Community Census Report to your personal schedule
1:45pm The Australian Open Source Industry & Community Census Report Jeff Waugh (Waugh Partners), Pia Waugh (Waugh Partners)
Add Introduction to LucidDB to your personal schedule
4:30pm Introduction to LucidDB John Sichi (LucidEra)
Add Muldis D: Portable Databases at Full Power to your personal schedule
5:20pm Muldis D: Portable Databases at Full Power Darren Duncan (Muldis Data Systems)
D136
Add Rebuilding Linux for the Desktop to your personal schedule
10:45am Rebuilding Linux for the Desktop Keith Packard (Intel)
Add Flying Linux to your personal schedule
1:45pm Flying Linux Daniel V. Klein (Self-employed)
Add Linux on the Corporate Desktop: We Did It, and You Can Too to your personal schedule
2:35pm Linux on the Corporate Desktop: We Did It, and You Can Too John Goerzen (Hustler Turf Equipment)
Add Open Source Virtualization Hacks to your personal schedule
5:20pm Open Source Virtualization Hacks Niel Bornstein (Novell, Inc.)
D135
Add LTS Tutorials: Using Ubuntu in the Enterprise to your personal schedule
10:45am LTS Tutorials: Using Ubuntu in the Enterprise Christer Edwards (Guru Labs, LC)
Add Ubuntu Server Technologies to your personal schedule
1:45pm Ubuntu Server Technologies Nick Barcet (Canonical UK Ltd), Rick Clark (Cisco Systems)
Add Ubuntu Deployment for Your Enterprise to your personal schedule
2:35pm Ubuntu Deployment for Your Enterprise Fredrik Jonsson (ASCI Sweden AB)
Add Landscape: Managing Ubuntu Deployments to your personal schedule
4:30pm Landscape: Managing Ubuntu Deployments Steve George (Canonical UK Ltd)
Add The Ubuntu Community to your personal schedule
5:20pm The Ubuntu Community Jono Bacon (Canonical Ltd)
D139/140
Add Building Compilers with the Parrot Compiler Toolkit to your personal schedule
10:45am Building Compilers with the Parrot Compiler Toolkit Patrick Michaud (pmichaud.com)
Add Beautiful Concurrency with Erlang to your personal schedule
11:35am Beautiful Concurrency with Erlang Kevin Scaldeferri (Gilt Groupe)
Add The Age of Literate Machines to your personal schedule
1:45pm The Age of Literate Machines Zak Greant (LexPublica)
Add Full-stack Introspection Crash Course to your personal schedule
2:35pm Full-stack Introspection Crash Course Theo Schlossnagle (OmniTI/Circonus)
Add Encapsulation & Its Discontents: Applying Normal Accident Theory to Software Design to your personal schedule
4:30pm Encapsulation & Its Discontents: Applying Normal Accident Theory to Software Design George Belotsky (CinematX Digital Inc.), Heath Johns (CinematX Digital Inc.)
Add An Illustrated History of Failure to your personal schedule
5:20pm An Illustrated History of Failure Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
D137
Add Heroes: Women in FOSS to your personal schedule
11:35am Heroes: Women in FOSS Pia Waugh (Waugh Partners)
Add Eat My Data: How Everybody Gets File IO Wrong to your personal schedule
4:30pm Eat My Data: How Everybody Gets File IO Wrong Stewart Smith (Percona)
Add Mashing Up Voice and the Web Through Open Source and XML to your personal schedule
5:20pm Mashing Up Voice and the Web Through Open Source and XML Dan York (Voxeo Corporation)
D138
Add Going Open Source: The 20 Most Important Things To Do to your personal schedule
10:45am Going Open Source: The 20 Most Important Things To Do Martin Aschoff (AGNITAS AG)
Add How I Learned to Love Revision Control to your personal schedule
1:45pm How I Learned to Love Revision Control David Gray (OmniTI)
Add Running a Successful User Group to your personal schedule
2:35pm Running a Successful User Group Selena Deckelmann (PostgreSQL), Gabrielle Roth (EnterpriseDB)
Add Open Source Software Economics, Standards, and IP in One Lesson to your personal schedule
4:30pm Open Source Software Economics, Standards, and IP in One Lesson Stephen Walli (CodePlex Foundation)
Add Trac: Project and Process Management for Developers and Sys Admins to your personal schedule
5:20pm Trac: Project and Process Management for Developers and Sys Admins Steven Ellis (Red Hat New Zealand)
F151
Add An Introduction to Ruby Web Frameworks to your personal schedule
10:45am An Introduction to Ruby Web Frameworks Ryan Briones (Department of Innovation and Technology, City of Chicago)
Add What Has Ruby Done for You Lately? to your personal schedule
11:35am What Has Ruby Done for You Lately? Adam Keys (The Real Adam)
Add Controlling Electronics with Ruby to your personal schedule
1:45pm Controlling Electronics with Ruby Ben Bleything (Bit Poetry, LLC)
Add Real-time Computer Vision with Ruby to your personal schedule
2:35pm Real-time Computer Vision with Ruby Jan Wedekind (Sheffield Hallam University)
Add VoIP Doesn't Suck Anymore -- Meet Adhearsion to your personal schedule
4:30pm VoIP Doesn't Suck Anymore -- Meet Adhearsion Jay Phillips (Codemecca LLC)
5:20pm TBC
E141
Add Manageability: Standards and Open Source to your personal schedule
10:45am Manageability: Standards and Open Source Rodolfo Kohn (Intel Corporation)
Add OSSL at Microsoft to your personal schedule
11:35am OSSL at Microsoft Hank Janssen (Microsoft)
1:45pm TBC
Add The Methodology of Sustainable Computing to your personal schedule
2:35pm The Methodology of Sustainable Computing David Bryan (Silicon Mechanics)
Add The Business Case for PostgreSQL and Postgres Plus to your personal schedule
4:30pm The Business Case for PostgreSQL and Postgres Plus Jim Mlodgenski (EnterpriseDB Corporation)
Add Secure Mashups with OpenAjax Hub 1.1 and OpenAjax Widget Metadata to your personal schedule
5:20pm Secure Mashups with OpenAjax Hub 1.1 and OpenAjax Widget Metadata Jon Ferraiolo (IBM and OpenAjax Alliance)
E142
Add Creating Data Services Mashups for SOA & Web 2.0 to your personal schedule
10:45am Creating Data Services Mashups for SOA & Web 2.0 Kirstan Vandersluis (XAware, Inc.)
Add From Laptop to Cloud with AMP and OpenSolaris to your personal schedule
11:35am From Laptop to Cloud with AMP and OpenSolaris Tim Bray (Google, Inc.), Wen Huang (Sun Microsystems, Inc.)
Add The Open-Source Identity Revolution to your personal schedule
1:45pm The Open-Source Identity Revolution David O'Flynn (Atlassian)
Add Think Outside the Box: The End of Standalone SaaS to your personal schedule
2:35pm Think Outside the Box: The End of Standalone SaaS Richard Dym (OpSource, Inc.)
Add Everything You Wanted to Know About openSUSE to your personal schedule
4:30pm Everything You Wanted to Know About openSUSE Joe Brockmeier (Red Hat)
E146
Add Cloud Computing with bigdata to your personal schedule
10:45am Cloud Computing with bigdata Bryan Thompson (SYSTAP, LLC)
Add Beyond REST? Building Data Services with XMPP PubSub to your personal schedule
11:35am Beyond REST? Building Data Services with XMPP PubSub Rabble Evan Henshaw-Plath (cuboxsa.com), Kellan Elliott-McCrea (Etsy)
Add Thunderbird 3 to your personal schedule
1:45pm Thunderbird 3 David Ascher (Mozilla Messaging), Dan Mosedale (Mozilla)
Add Firefox Delivered: OSS Infrastructure for the Masses to your personal schedule
2:35pm Firefox Delivered: OSS Infrastructure for the Masses Justin Fitzhugh (Mozilla)
Add Hot Chocolate: Creating Cocoa Apps with PHP to your personal schedule
4:30pm Hot Chocolate: Creating Cocoa Apps with PHP Wez Furlong (Message Systems, Inc.)
Add Tools for Local Communities to your personal schedule
5:20pm Tools for Local Communities Audrey Eschright (Elevated Code / Stumptown Syndicate), Selena Deckelmann (PostgreSQL), Michael Dexter (The BSD Fund), Sulamita Garcia (Intel)
E143/144
Add OSCamp 2008 to your personal schedule
9:00am OSCAMP
OSCamp 2008
E145
Add Web Graphics & Animations Without Flash (or GFX Deliciousness with Dojo) to your personal schedule
11:35am Web Graphics & Animations Without Flash (or GFX Deliciousness with Dojo) Matthew Russell (Digital Reasoning Systems)
Add Google XML Pages (GXP) to your personal schedule
1:45pm Google XML Pages (GXP) Laurence Gonsalves (Google), Harry Heymann (Google)
Add Orbited: Enabling Comet for the Masses to your personal schedule
2:35pm Orbited: Enabling Comet for the Masses Michael Carter (Orbited), Jacob Rus (Orbited)
Add Web Frameworks of the Future: Flex, GWT, Grail, and Rails to your personal schedule
4:30pm Web Frameworks of the Future: Flex, GWT, Grail, and Rails Matt Raible (Raible Designs, Inc.)
Add XMPP/Open Source Components for Cloud Services to your personal schedule
5:20pm XMPP/Open Source Components for Cloud Services Matt Tucker (Jive Software)
7:30am Breakfast
Room: Expo Hall
10:15am AM Break
Room: Expo Hall
12:20pm Lunch
Room: Expo Hall
3:20pm PM Break
Room: Expo Hall
TBC
Add Expo Hall Reception to your personal schedule
6:00pm Expo Hall Reception
Room: Expo Hall
Expo Hall Reception
F150
Add Better Living Through OpenJDK: IcedTea, BrandWeg, and SoyLatte to your personal schedule
10:45am Better Living Through OpenJDK: IcedTea, BrandWeg, and SoyLatte Dalibor Topic (Sun Microsystems GmbH)
Add CouchDB from 10,000 ft to your personal schedule
11:35am CouchDB from 10,000 ft Jan Lehnardt (CouchDB)
Add Groovy vs. JRuby to your personal schedule
1:45pm Groovy vs. JRuby Rod Cope (OpenLogic, Inc.)
Add An Introduction to Open Source Animation to your personal schedule
5:20pm An Introduction to Open Source Animation Elizabeth Garbee (none)
10:45am-11:30am (45m) PHP
The Internet is an Ogre: Finding Art in the Software Architecture
Terry Chay (Automattic, Inc. (WordPress))
Priorities and pitfalls when building a large consumer-facing social network.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) PHP
PHP Taint Tool: It Ain't a Parser
Luke Welling ([Redacted])
By looking at the opcodes that a PHP script gets compiled into you can get a really detailed view of what your code is going to do—if you can read them, or have a tool to help. This can help with benchmarking questions, and allow you to look for tainted variables that might have security implications without having to audit every line of source code.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) PHP
Write Beautiful Code (in PHP)
Laura Thomson (Mozilla Corporation)
In this talk, Laura Thomson will present guidelines for writing, not just maintainable, but beautiful code. Code that is simple, robust and error resistant, secure, scalable and performant, and easy to produce in a reasonable time frame.
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) PHP
Caching and Performance: Lessons from Facebook
Lucas Nealan (Facebook)
Learn to effectively use caching to improve the performance of your PHP site.
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) Emerging Topics
The Google Open Source Update
Chris DiBona (Google, Inc.) et al
In this talk, DiBona and Hawthorn will review last year's open source activities from Google. This will feature an in-depth look at this year's Summer of Code, with over 1000 students taking part, and their high school program.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) PHP
Give Your Site a Boost with memcached
Ben Ramsey (Moontoast)
Today's high-traffic web sites must implement measures to reduce load and increase speed of delivery. One such method is the use of a cache and memcached provides one of the fastest and easiest-to-use caching servers. This talk will cover memcached from setting up a memcached server to using it to provide a variety of caching solutions.
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Emerging Topics
Changing Education... Open Content, Open Hardware, Open Curricula
Cliff Schmidt (Literacy Bridge) et al
In the wake of the "Cape Town Declaration," more and more open source people are thinking about applying open source principles to Education. This panel discussion will introduce exciting concepts and some of the thought leaders in the Open Educational Content movement. There will be opportunities to learn about getting involved. Come get inspired!!
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) Ruby
Metaprogramming in Ruby
Brian Sam-Bodden (Integrallis Software, LLC.)
In this session we will explore some of the metaprogramming techniques that make Ruby the ideal language for framework development. Learn how frameworks like Ruby on Rails and others exploit metaprogramming to infuse that special magic that only open dynamic languages can produce.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) Programming
Code Reviews for Fun and Profit
Alex Martelli (Google)
Code reviews are a well-known best practice in all SW development, and particularly crucial for open source SW. Systematic and optimally conducted reviews enhance your code quality and offer great ROI, but you need to pay attention to both the human/community and technical aspects of such pratice. Get some key "do"s and "don't"s about performing code reviews!
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Web Applications
A Critical View of OpenID
Jason Levitt (Spirit.io) et al
OpenID (openid.net) is a single sign-on solution that has gained a lot of traction in 2008. Putting a critical eye to openid's many deployments, this panel will consider questions such as "how has openid succeeded/failed?," "how have end-users responded to openid?," "is openid safer/more-dangerous than other approaches?" "what are some openid success stories?," and "how could openid be improved?"
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) People
Open Source Community Antipatterns
Ted Leung (The Walt Disney Company)
Interested in starting or participating in an open source project? Here are some ways to make sure that your project will fail or have an unhealthy community.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) People
An Open Source Project Called "Failure:" Community Antipatterns to Know and Avoid
Josh Berkus (PostgreSQL Experts, Inc.) et al
This panel of career open source geeks has ample experience in open source community disasters and failed projects, and how they happen. Join them for examples, stories, and Q&A around why projects fail and how you can identify bad trends before your project crashes.
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Emerging Topics
Hydra: A Wireless Multihop Networking Testbed
Hyrum Wright (WANdisco, Inc.) et al
Hydra is a wireless multithop networking testbed, created completely from open source components. Designed to be modular and easily expandable, Hydra allows networking researchers and enthusiasts to implement by physical layer and MAC protocols quickly, and cheaply, and test them over real wireless channels.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) Linux
Open Virtual Machine Tools
Adar Dembo (VMware Inc.)
The Open Virtual Machine Tools project provides a variety of tools and utilities that improve the performance and user experience of guest operating systems without requiring modifications to the kernel. This talk will describe the ways that the open-vm-tools project provides these improvements. The talk will be of particular interest to those working in the virtual appliance space.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) Programming
Subversion Worst Practices
Ben Collins-Sussman (Google, Inc.) et al
In past years we've talked about Subversion "best practices." In this talk we'll discuss the worst blunders to avoid when using Subversion in your open source project: bad layouts, ridiculous hook scripts, file locking, too much access control, confused merges, versioning derived objects, mixing locales, and other painful mistakes.
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Linux
Measuring and Trends in Linux Kernel Quality
Arjan van de Ven (Intel)
There has been much fuss about the supposedly decreasing quality of the Linux kernel. This presentation talks about some efforts to counter that, and shows measurements of what is really going on.
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) Administration
Open Source Virtualization for People Who Feel Guilty About Using VMware So Much
Andy de la Lucha (Mentor Graphics)
VMware has a place at the top of the virtualization industry, but is not open source, gets expensive, and can feel claustrophobic as VMware "makes a tool for every job." This talk will go over open source equivalents to the most prominent VMware products, existing high-profile uses, and how existing VMware deployments can co-exist with open source virtualization.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) Programming
Shell Scripting Craftsmanship
Ray Smith (Portland General Electric)
Shell scripts automate routine and repetitive tasks in Linux/Unix. Adding craftsmanship and style to your scripts will improve their usefulness and reliability.
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Perl
Strawberry Perl: Achieving Win32 Platform Equality
Adam Kennedy (Corporate Express Australia)
Perl 5.10.0 marks the first production release of Strawberry Perl, a 100% open source and CPAN-compatible Perl distribution for Windows that works "exactly the same as Perl everywhere else." Discover the history, present and future of the community-driven Perl distribution, and learn how to use the Perl::Dist toolkit to "roll your own" Perl.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) Perl, Programming
Perl 5.10 for People Who Are Not (Totally) Insane
Ricardo Signes (Pobox.com)
Perl 5.10 is the first major release of Perl in five years, and brings dozens of new features and significant improvements. This talk provides a guided tour of features that can benefit everyday users of Perl, not just the frightening C programmers who make Perl itself go.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) Perl
Perl 6 Update
Damian Conway (Thoughtstream) et al
Larry Wall and Damian Conway will present the latest features of Perl 6, and discuss the transition from design phase to full implementation of the new Perl.
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Perl
Rakudo: Perl 6 on Parrot
Patrick Michaud (pmichaud.com) et al
This talk will report on the overall status and implementation of the Rakudo Perl compiler targetting the Parrot virtual machine. The talk will also cover the design of the compiler itself, focusing on the overall architecture, the structure of the Perl 6 test suite, and provide details that will enable others to become involved and to directly contribute to the remaining work of building Rakudo.
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) Perl
Moose: A Postmodern Object System for Perl 5
Stevan Little (Infinity Interactive)
Moose is a new postmodern object system for Perl 5 that is gaining traction within the community, it is based on Perl 6 and borrows from such diverse sources as CLOS (LISP), Smalltalk, Ruby, BETA, O'Caml, and more. This talk will provide a conceptual overview of the major parts of Moose, including roles, type constraints, metaclasses, and more.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) Perl
Barely Legal XXX Perl
Jos Boumans (Krux Digital)
"Barely Legal XXX Perl" shows several features of Perl you might not have known that existed, that are being (ab)used to run a program that was designed never to be able to run in the first place... It's a high paced, humourous, and entertaining look at Perl's slightly less obvious features.
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Databases
How to be Normal: A Guide for Developers
Mike Hillyer (Message Systems)
At some point in every software project involving a database it becomes necessary for the developers who created (or inherited) the project to step back and take a look at their database. Many projects have a database schema that has evolved over time, with columns added here and tables added there, increasing complexity and often adding redundancy.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) Databases
Lock Up Your Data
Josh Berkus (PostgreSQL Experts, Inc.)
Data = money. Yet most web applications do little or nothing to secure their data against thieves. Learn some easy methods to lock up yours.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) People
The Australian Open Source Industry & Community Census Report
Jeff Waugh (Waugh Partners) et al
What have they put in the water Down Under? Australia punches far above its weight in the open source community, producing some of its most prolific and innovative developers from one of the largest pools of contributors per-capita... Find out why Aussies rock open source from the world's first nation-wide industry and community survey.
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Databases
Hypertable: An Open Source, High Performance, Scalable Database
Doug Judd (Zvents, Inc.)
Hypertable is an open source, high performance, distributed database modeled after Google's Bigtable. The current scalable database solutions are somewhat ad hoc and leave much to be desired, until now. Hypertable brings scalable storage technology to the masses.
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) Databases
Introduction to LucidDB
John Sichi (LucidEra)
LucidDB is a new open source RDBMS purpose-built entirely for data warehousing and business intelligence. This talk will cover the project's architectural features and how they can be applied to achieve superior performance and ease of administration in this specialized domain.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) Databases
Muldis D: Portable Databases at Full Power
Darren Duncan (Muldis Data Systems)
How would you like to have a full-featured object-relational DBMS integrated right into your development environment? One that understands OOP, implements all of the relational operators, and greatly shortens development time? That gets you away from the tyranny of SQL so you can focus on what you really know? Introducing Muldis D, an industrial-strength language with fully integrated ORDBMS.
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Linux
Rebuilding Linux for the Desktop
Keith Packard (Intel)
Over the last several years, architectural changes within the Linux environment have promised new features and functionality for the desktop user, including transparent applications and multiuser displays. These have become demonstrable in limited environments for some time and work continues to bring them into wider use. This presentation will present the status and plans of these projects.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) Linux
What Makes a Modern Linux Desktop, and Why Do You Care?
Matthew Garrett (Nebula)
The Linux desktop has moved far beyond the point where it consisted of a kernel, an X server, and the xclock command. A bewildering array of layers exist to move information around, abstract unnecessary complexities, and perform various practical functions. This presentation seeks to remove some of the mystery of the modern desktop.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) Linux
Flying Linux
Daniel V. Klein (Self-employed)
I flew across the Atlantic on an Airbus -- that was fly by wire. No cables in the control system, just a computer controlling everything. Would you fly if Windows was the controlling software? How about Linux? Think again!
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Linux
Linux on the Corporate Desktop: We Did It, and You Can Too
John Goerzen (Hustler Turf Equipment)
A mid-sized manufacturing company has successfully switched the majority of its employees to Linux on the desktop. This talk will cover why this was done, how it was accomplished, and the lessons learned during the deployment. It will cover both technical and business/political aspects of making such a switch, and give you pointers on making a similar switch in your organization.
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) Linux
Moblin.org: The Community for Linux on Mobile Internet Devices (MID), netbooks, nettops and More…
Dirk Hohndel (Intel Corporation)
A new class of devices is emerging that enables full Internet access while on the go. These internet-centric devices known as Mobile Internet Devices (MIDs), netbooks, nettops combine the software compatibility of the PC with an easy to use, consumer friendly user interface.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) Administration
Open Source Virtualization Hacks
Niel Bornstein (Novell, Inc.)
Everyone's using virtualization, from proprietary systems like VMware to open source ones like Xen and KVM. The smart money has the virtualization itself becoming a commodity, so the fun begins when you try to manage your VMs using open source tools.
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Administration, Ubuntu
LTS Tutorials: Using Ubuntu in the Enterprise
Christer Edwards (Guru Labs, LC)
LTS Tutorials demonstrates how to use Ubuntu in an Enterprise setting in a number of ways. From how to setup LAMP, mass hands-off network deployment, File Servers (NFS, SMB, FTP, SFTP), repository mirroring, and internal secure IM with Jabber.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) Administration, Ubuntu
How to Achieve Secure Integration of Ubuntu and MS Active Directory Without Breaking the Bank
Jerry Carter (Likewise Software)
Here's an industrial-strength way to address the issue of connecting to a directory in a mixed environment. Instead of grappling with homegrown directory solutions, now there's an open source way to leverage your company's investment in Active Directory.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) Linux, Ubuntu
Ubuntu Server Technologies
Nick Barcet (Canonical UK Ltd) et al
Peek under the hood of the Ubuntu Server.
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Administration, Ubuntu
Ubuntu Deployment for Your Enterprise
Fredrik Jonsson (ASCI Sweden AB)
A presentation about how Ubuntu Deployment mechanisms can be used for multiple, zero touch installations in your enterprise network as well as how custom-made network install CDs can provide remote disaster recovery of a machine for a user that is even off site (only internet connection required).
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) Administration, Ubuntu
Landscape: Managing Ubuntu Deployments
Steve George (Canonical UK Ltd)
Landscape is a system management service that allows you to manage multiple Ubuntu machines as easily as one. Learn how you can manage many machines in a complex environment through a single web-based interface.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) People, Ubuntu
The Ubuntu Community
Jono Bacon (Canonical Ltd)
The Ubuntu community is where the spirit of Ubuntu comes to life. Learn how it all works, and how you can get involved.
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Programming
Building Compilers with the Parrot Compiler Toolkit
Patrick Michaud (pmichaud.com)
Parrot is the virtual machine intended to run Perl 6 and other dynamic languages efficiently and effectively. Parrot tools used to build "Rakudo" (Perl 6 on Parrot) are powerful and general enough to host other languages. This talk explains how they work and demonstrates how to start running your own language on Parrot--and to use other code targeting Parrot without writing it yourself.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) Programming
Beautiful Concurrency with Erlang
Kevin Scaldeferri (Gilt Groupe)
An introduction to the concurrency features of Erlang, showing how to build reliable, scalable applications without getting lost in the plumbing.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) Emerging Topics
The Age of Literate Machines
Zak Greant (LexPublica)
Free Software and Open Source are understood to be reshaping technology. What is less understood is how critical FOSS is to the future of free societies. During this session, we'll examine the past, present and future of our freedoms, stopping along the way to visit ancient god-kings, hacker heretics, long-dead muftis, and our first computers.
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Programming
Full-stack Introspection Crash Course
Theo Schlossnagle (OmniTI/Circonus)
My system is slow! My app is slow! What in tarnation is going on? Using powerful tools we will finally answer the question: what is my system doing?
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) Programming
Encapsulation & Its Discontents: Applying Normal Accident Theory to Software Design
George Belotsky (CinematX Digital Inc.) et al
Normal Accident Theory (NAT) describes the potential for failure in many diverse systems, from nuclear reactors to marine shipping. It also predicts many classical techniques that good programmers have come to rely on. A NAT-based approach provides a unifying view that helps you avoid the hidden dangers of otherwise useful constructs, and improves the reliability of the software you build.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) Programming
An Illustrated History of Failure
Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
The average individual is given little scope for failure, at least not the type that really matters. However in recent times we have developed a profession who have the opportunity to fail like never before. The few, the proud, the Software Developers. Join us for a voyage of discovery, as we travel back through history to some of the most monumental failures the world has ever seen.
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Emerging Topics
Laika: Testing Electronic Health Record Interoperability
Andy Gregorowicz (MITRE)
Laika is an open source testing framework that is changing the certification process for electronic health records (EHR) in the U.S. Hear about EHR data standards, the testing process, how to test an EHR, how to get involved, and the impact of FOSS on Health IT.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) People
Heroes: Women in FOSS
Pia Waugh (Waugh Partners)
All over the world women are discovering that they have special abilities, and that they are not alone. Come on a journey to hear about some of the amazing women in FOSS, their achievements, how you can get involved, and how to get more women involved both in FOSS and ICT. Waugh also draws from her experience talking to thousands of school girls about ICT careers.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) Emerging Topics
Creating & Supporting Free Software in Africa: the African Virtual Open Initiatives & Resources (AVOIR) experience
Derek Keats (The University of the Western Cape)
Free and Open Source software is often seen as a largely Western and predominantly male phenomenon. This talk explores experiences of FOSS development in an Africa-led project to build capacity, and extends our understanding of FOSS to other cultures and societies, and shows how collaboration around FOSS can foster innovation and contribute to development in Africa.
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Emerging Topics
How Open Source Software & Wireless Networks are Transforming Two Cultures: An Investigation in Urban North America & Rural Africa
Thomas McGonagle (Bentley College/CSC Inc. )
In one year we have seen the release of the XO laptop, Asus's EEE PC, and Nokia's third generation Internet tablet. Open source software and wireless technology provide a tremendous opportunity for low cost Internet access infrastructure and end user access in Urban North America and Rural Africa. Research on this topic will be presented.
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) Programming
Eat My Data: How Everybody Gets File IO Wrong
Stewart Smith (Percona)
Odds are you get an F in using the POSIX file IO APIs. Even better, you probably don't know it. Oh, and operating systems can hate you. As a user, you'll leave crying. As a developer, you'll leave knowing you have bugs to fix.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) Web Applications
Mashing Up Voice and the Web Through Open Source and XML
Dan York (Voxeo Corporation)
As "mashups" become a key way to access information on the Internet, the question is: how can you add voice into the picture? Given the ubiquity of the phone, how can you make it easy for people to call and interact with your applications? Join this session to learn about how you can use the power of XML, open source, and open standards to add voice to your web applications.
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Fundamentals
Going Open Source: The 20 Most Important Things To Do
Martin Aschoff (AGNITAS AG)
When going open source with your software there are 20 important things you definitely have to do to be successful. Join this session and hear tips and examples from someone who had to learn some of this stuff the hard way.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) Fundamentals
Setting Up a Decent Developer Box for OSS and Linux Community Development
Mark Gross (Intel)
Mark Gross will discuss taking a new Ubuntu derivative installation on a laptop and making it a decent developer box for OSS community work. The tools and methods covered will include IRC, procmail, mutt, ctags, build tools, python, pylynt, quilt, git, svn, Email and gmail use for busy mailing lists, checkpatch, debugfs, VIM, and others.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) Fundamentals
How I Learned to Love Revision Control
David Gray (OmniTI)
"Revision control? What's that?" Knowing what I know now, it's scary to look back and ask what might have happened if one hard drive had failed at the wrong time. After reviewing some revision control concepts, we will look at several projects to see how they could have leveraged revision control and what the benefits would have been.
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Fundamentals
Running a Successful User Group
Selena Deckelmann (PostgreSQL) et al
If you're interested in starting, currently lead, or are interested in helping with an existing local users group, this talk is for you! Selena Deckelmann and Gabrielle Roth have started two successful user groups in the Portland area and will share their tips with you.
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) Fundamentals
Open Source Software Economics, Standards, and IP in One Lesson
Stephen Walli (CodePlex Foundation)
Free and open source software use has grown tremendously both in IT and in software businesses. There is still confusion around what this means for software intellectual property, or how it relates to industry standards. The talk provides context and history to show how the subjects relate to support better business decisions.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) Fundamentals
Trac: Project and Process Management for Developers and Sys Admins
Steven Ellis (Red Hat New Zealand)
Real world use of Trac, moving beyond software development and into process and work flow management.
<div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 8:45am-9:00am (15m) </div> <div class="en_popup_name">Welcome</div> <div class="en_popup_speaker">Allison Randal (DrugDev, Inc.) et al</div> <div class="en_popup_desc">Opening remarks.</div> </div> <div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 9:00am-9:15am (15m) Keynote </div> <div class="en_popup_name">Open Source on the O&#x27;Reilly Radar</div> <div class="en_popup_speaker">Tim O&#x27;Reilly (O&#x27;Reilly Media, Inc.) </div> <div class="en_popup_desc">Coming soon. </div> </div> <div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 9:15am-9:30am (15m) Keynote </div> <div class="en_popup_name">Open Source Physical Security: Can We Have Both Privacy and Safety?</div> <div class="en_popup_speaker">Christine Peterson (Foresight Institute) </div> <div class="en_popup_desc">In today&#x27;s post-9/11 world, it is increasingly assumed that security from terrorism and other attacks will require the loss of privacy by individuals and private organizations. </div> </div>
<div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 9:30am-9:45am (15m) Keynote </div> <div class="en_popup_name">Moblin, Linux for Next Generation Mobile Internet</div> <div class="en_popup_speaker">Dirk Hohndel (Intel Corporation) </div> <div class="en_popup_desc">Dirk Hohndel will present the technology vision and direction for Moblin.org, The open source community for developing the next generation internet and media experience on a new category of internet-centric devices such as Mobile Internet Devices, netbooks, nettops and Automotive In-Vehicle Infotainment Systems.</div> </div> <div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 9:45am-10:00am (15m) Keynote </div> <div class="en_popup_name">Tim O&#x27;Reilly Interviews Monty Widenius &amp; Brian Aker</div> <div class="en_popup_speaker">Tim O&#x27;Reilly (O&#x27;Reilly Media, Inc.) et al</div> <div class="en_popup_desc">Coming soon. </div> </div> <div class="en_popup_content"> <div class="en_popup_time"> 10:00am-10:15am (15m) Keynote </div> <div class="en_popup_name">Q &amp; A</div> <div class="en_popup_desc">An open microphone question and answer session with the morning&#x27;s keynote speakers.</div> </div>
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Ruby
An Introduction to Ruby Web Frameworks
Ryan Briones (Department of Innovation and Technology, City of Chicago)
An overview of a few Ruby Web Frameworks, including basic usage and how to pragmatically choose which one to use, and how Ruby makes them special.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) Ruby
What Has Ruby Done for You Lately?
Adam Keys (The Real Adam)
Ruby has lots of neat features for writing small, beautiful programs. But, borrowing features from other languages makes it even better! Learn how continuations, pattern matching, and actor-based concurrency can help you write Ruby programs that do more with less code.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) Ruby
Controlling Electronics with Ruby
Ben Bleything (Bit Poetry, LLC)
It used to be that in order to program a microcontroller, you had to get down and dirty with assembly or, if you were really lucky, C. No longer. I'll show a number of ways that you can control embedded devices from your beloved Ruby.
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Ruby
Real-time Computer Vision with Ruby
Jan Wedekind (Sheffield Hallam University)
Computer vision software requires image- and video-file-I/O as well as camera access and fast video display. Ruby and existing open source software allowed us to develop a machine vision library combining performance and flexibility in an unprecedented way. Native array operations are used to implement a variety of machine vision algorithms. This research was funded by the Nanorobotics grant.
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) Ruby
VoIP Doesn't Suck Anymore -- Meet Adhearsion
Jay Phillips (Codemecca LLC)
The Adhearsion framework, written in Ruby, takes a new approach to building VoIP applications: it’s an abstraction layer that both manages the underlying complexity and empowers VoIP applications with an unprecedented ease of integration. In this tutorial, learn from Adhearsion’s creator how to use VoIP for your new product, service, or hacker project.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m)
Session
To be confirmed
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Products & Services
Manageability: Standards and Open Source
Rodolfo Kohn (Intel Corporation)
This session shows how managing open-source operating systems on Intel hardware got easier using open-source implementations of industry standards and demonstrates interoperability between Linux and Windows and Intel AMT using the WS-Management protocol.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) Products & Services
OSSL at Microsoft
Hank Janssen (Microsoft)
Microsoft and Open Source? Oil and water? This session will talk about the efforts of the Microsoft Open Source and Novell Interoperability Labs. Learn about efforts to-date, and what our roadmap into the future looks like.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m)
Session
To be confirmed
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Products & Services
The Methodology of Sustainable Computing
David Bryan (Silicon Mechanics)
The U.S. data center industry is in a major growth period fueled by demand for data processing and storage. As demand increases, the industry is looking for ways to increase efficiency. There is significant potential for improvements in servers and in data centers using methods and technologies currently available.
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) Products & Services
The Business Case for PostgreSQL and Postgres Plus
Jim Mlodgenski (EnterpriseDB Corporation)
Market studies show that commercial adoption and deployment of Postgres is accelerating. This talk explores the business reasons behind this increasing popularity, and makes the case that Postgres Plus — the leading commercial Postgres distribution — will cause adoption to accelerate even further,
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) Products & Services
Secure Mashups with OpenAjax Hub 1.1 and OpenAjax Widget Metadata
Jon Ferraiolo (IBM and OpenAjax Alliance)
Mashups have the potential for revolutionizing the way Web applications are developed, but there are interoperability and security challenges. This session will describe current work at OpenAjax Alliance on open source and standards, particularly its secure mashup runtime (OpenAjax Hub 1.1) and its mashup widgets standard (OpenAjax Metadata for Widgets).
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Products & Services
Creating Data Services Mashups for SOA & Web 2.0
Kirstan Vandersluis (XAware, Inc.)
Mixing and mashing multiple data sources, all of different formats, into something that makes sense is a headache for many software architects. Data services mashups – the pulling of data from multiple sources into a logical unit – would be easy if enterprise information came in well-formatted XML. But that’s not reality.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) Products & Services
From Laptop to Cloud with AMP and OpenSolaris
Tim Bray (Google, Inc.) et al
Developers are looking for simple, standardized ways to develop enterprise social / mashup applications that can be easily ported (and scaled) from from their laptops to the Cloud. Join this session to learn how to rapidly create and deploy web applications using Sun's updated AMP stack on OpenSolaris and the NetBeans IDE.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) Products & Services
The Open-Source Identity Revolution
David O'Flynn (Atlassian)
Who you are on the internet has gotten a lot more complicated over the last ten years. You're on Flickr, Google, Facebook, and more. Tying all these together is an open-source job. For the first time everyone has realized you have to be open - even Microsoft is playing ball.
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Products & Services
Think Outside the Box: The End of Standalone SaaS
Richard Dym (OpSource, Inc.)
The days of building SaaS applications that function in silos has ended. At this session you will earn how platform choices and Web services can save SaaS development cost, expand markets and overcome enterprise objections to SaaS adoption due to lack of integration behind the corporate fire wall.
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) Products & Services
Everything You Wanted to Know About openSUSE
Joe Brockmeier (Red Hat)
Brockmeier will cover the openSUSE community, what's new in the openSUSE distribution, the openSUSE Build Service, and how to get involved with the project.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) Products & Services
Discover OBM, The Enterprise-Class Email and Groupware Solution
Pierre Baudracco (Linagora)
OBM is recognized as THE GPL enterprise-class email and groupware solution. OBM is a unified platform that allows small to large businesses to gain efficiency while reducing cost of ownership and administration complexity. It is built on the most mature open source components with a modular architecture : OBM is used by over 600,000 users worldwide.
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Programming
Cloud Computing with bigdata
Bryan Thompson (SYSTAP, LLC)
bigdata is a scale-out database and computing platform designed for commodity hardware. The presentation will cover scale-out indices, map/reduce computing, and how we have applied these techniques to develop a high-performance scale-out semantic web database.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) Emerging Topics
Beyond REST? Building Data Services with XMPP PubSub
Rabble Evan Henshaw-Plath (cuboxsa.com) et al
How do we make our web services scale in an era of decentralization, increased participation, real-time expectations, and polling-based architectures? Using Jabber/XMPP's PubSub extension and OAuth is one model. This talk covers examples including Flickr and Fire Eagle and how to build data services with XMPP PubSub.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) Emerging Topics
Thunderbird 3
David Ascher (Mozilla Messaging) et al
An update on Mozilla's new efforts in messaging and email, including a status report on Thunderbird 3, the next generation of the email client built on the same platform as Firefox.
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Administration
Firefox Delivered: OSS Infrastructure for the Masses
Justin Fitzhugh (Mozilla)
Learn how the Mozilla IT team scales its update and software delivery systems to support the over 150 million Firefox users.
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) PHP
Hot Chocolate: Creating Cocoa Apps with PHP
Wez Furlong (Message Systems, Inc.)
Ever wanted to throw together a GUI app for the Mac but felt intimidated at the prospect of learning Objective-C? Ever wished there was a Mac native version of PHP-GTK? This session will give you a peek at building native Mac apps using PHP.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) People
Tools for Local Communities
Audrey Eschright (Elevated Code / Stumptown Syndicate) et al
The open source movement is global, but interesting and exciting things happen at the local scale too. In this panel, community organizers will talk about the social and technological tools they use to to gather, collaborate, and learn.
9:00am-6:00pm (9h) Event
OSCamp 2008
OSCamp 2008 hosts FOSSCoach, a community organized event designed to share and improve the essential skills required to participate in collaborative, free and open online projects. OSCamp attendance is free with an Expo Hall pass.
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Web Applications
Open Source Rich Internet Applications with Silverlight & Moonlight
Joseph Hill (Novell)
In this session you will learn how to use Moonlight, the latest open source web development tool to emerge from the Mono project. Moonlight enables the creation and delivery of rich Internet applications on Linux using Microsoft's Silverlight technology. Participants will learn how to install, develop, and deploy Silverlight and Moonlight applications, from the server to the desktop.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) Web Applications
Web Graphics & Animations Without Flash (or GFX Deliciousness with Dojo)
Matthew Russell (Digital Reasoning Systems)
An in-depth presentation on Dojo's graphics project (GFX), which provides an SVG-centric JavaScript API for creating, manipulating, and even animating graphics in the browser. Dojo'x GFX project is cross-platform and capable of supporting multiple back-ends including SVG, VML, and Sliverlight. Learn how to create stunning graphics, animate them, and even do some 3D rendering--all without Flash!
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) Web Applications
Google XML Pages (GXP)
Laurence Gonsalves (Google) et al
GXP is a templating system used to output XML/SGML markup (most often HTML). Used internally at Google for many years, we are now open sourcing this tool for community use and development.
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Python
Orbited: Enabling Comet for the Masses
Michael Carter (Orbited) et al
HTTP push-style web interaction, known as Comet, is a cutting-edge technique for creating truly interactive, real-time web applications. This talk will teach developers to painlessly incorporate Comet into their new and existing web applications using Orbited, the cross-platform, cross-browser, and cross-language Comet server.
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) Web Applications
Web Frameworks of the Future: Flex, GWT, Grail, and Rails
Matt Raible (Raible Designs, Inc.)
What if the choices in web framework were reduced to 4. If RIA are the way of the future, it's possible that these 4 frameworks are the best choices for this development paradigm. This session will explore these frameworks, as well as entertain other opinions on the future of web development. Open minds are most welcome.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) Web Applications
XMPP/Open Source Components for Cloud Services
Matt Tucker (Jive Software)
There's a new firestorm brewing in web services architectures. Cloud services are being talked up as a fundamental shift in web architecture that promises to move us from interconnected silos to a collaborative network of services whose sum is greater than its parts.
7:30am-8:45am (1h 15m)
Break: Breakfast
10:15am-10:45am (30m)
Break: AM Break
12:20pm-1:45pm (1h 25m)
Break: Lunch
3:20pm-4:30pm (1h 10m)
Plenary: PM Break
To be confirmed
6:00pm-7:30pm (1h 30m) Event
Expo Hall Reception
Have a drink and mingle with other OSCON participants, and see the latest products, projects, services, and gadgets from sponsors and exhibitors in the Expo Hall.
10:45am-11:30am (45m) Java
Better Living Through OpenJDK: IcedTea, BrandWeg, and SoyLatte
Dalibor Topic (Sun Microsystems GmbH)
More than a year after OpenJDK has been liberated, it's time for an overview of the ports and projects that have been created around it, why they exist, how they work, and how they interact with the upstream.
11:35am-12:20pm (45m) Databases
CouchDB from 10,000 ft
Jan Lehnardt (CouchDB)
This presentation takes a look at CouchDB from 10,000 ft. We try not to lose you in technical details and paint the big picture that you need to understand CouchDB's strengths and weaknesses. CouchDB is a _document oriented database_. It does not adhere to the relational principles of traditional databases. You will learn what that means for your application design.
1:45pm-2:30pm (45m) Java
Groovy vs. JRuby
Rod Cope (OpenLogic, Inc.)
Groovy and JRuby are both dynamic, object-oriented scripting languages for the JVM. They both support tight, bi-directional integration with existing Java code and can compile to .class files that reside in jars. So, which is best for you? Which to learn if you only have time for one? Come see recommendations from someone who has put thousands of lines of each into production environments.
2:35pm-3:20pm (45m) Java
Extending, Expanding, and Porting Mobile & Embedded Community Projects
Phil Bartholo (Sun Microsystems)
Since the opening of Mobile & Embedded Community projects in November of 2006, community members have been extending, porting, and expanding projects in the community well beyond their original targets. This talks centers on the many extensions that have already occurred and encourages additional open source efforts of Mobile & Embedded projects.
4:30pm-5:15pm (45m) Java
Developers vs Designers: Expanding the Java Platform Beyond Programmers
Joshua Marinacci (Nokia)
In the past the Java platform has been unfriendly to designers, just as the development of user-focused software is shifting greatly in favor of designers. This session covers how the development of software has changed over the past 20 years and the many developments in the Java ecosystem that promise to open the platform to non-programmers.
5:20pm-6:05pm (45m) Emerging Topics
An Introduction to Open Source Animation
Elizabeth Garbee (none)
For the graphically minded members of the Linux community, this talk explains and demonstrates how high-quality animation can be achieved using purely open source tools. We'll explore different physical media and open source tools for generating individual images, then learn how to turn those images into one-of-a-kind, completely open animation.
OSCON 2008