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Open Source and the Education Community: A Report, and Some Suggestions

James Stanger (VCampus Corporation )
Emerging Topics
Location: D138
Average rating: ***..
(3.50, 2 ratings)

While universities worldwide are interested in open source, proprietary software occupies the lion’s share of courses taught in IT departments. As a result, many of the best and brightest minds and developers spend less time focusing on open source.

This is a significant problem for the future, because the university is the traditional breeding ground for open source. While it is tempting to argue that university professors are simply old tenure-loving codgers who teach 20-year old material, the reasons are more subtle. Sometimes the university is at fault. At other times, the professor. Also culpable is the open source community who has had a rather cavalier attitude concerning how it will sustain itself as a movement.

The presentation will consider:

  • What motivates universities and other institutions to consider open source as a lesser alternative to proprietary software.
  • What—and who—is holding back large-scale adoption of open source?
  • What open source “friends” are actually holding us back from success?
  • What universities and colleges are at the forefront of open source adoption, and why?

The presentation will conclude with a discussion of specific steps the open source community can make to ensure it gets true institutional buy-in, and attracts the best talent available.

James Stanger

VCampus Corporation

James Stanger, PhD

Dr. Stanger is an accomplished writer, security consultant, and Web designer. As Chief Certification Architect for VCampus Corporation, he manages the technical content for the following certifications:
  • CIW:http://www.ciwcertified.com/
  • CTP:http://www.ctpcertified.com/
  • CCNT:http://www.ccntonline.com/

Dr. Stanger has traveled the world supporting these certifications, working with industry and academia.

He is also Chair of the Linux Professional Institute (LPI) Advisory Council and has helped design certifications and curriculum for IBM, Symantec, CompTIA, and the Telephony Industry Association (TIA).

An award-winning author, Dr. Stanger has written titles for O’Reilly, McGraw-Hill, Prentice-Hall, IBM, Wiley, and Elsevier. His writings have been translated into over a dozen languages.

He runs a blog at www.ciwcommunity.org, and has regularly created podcasts with fellow techies since 2000 – clear back when they didn’t even call them “podcasts.”

James has spent the last two decades writing, lecturing and consulting worldwide about Web design, network security, convergence/VoIP, open source, and Linux system administration. Past clients include Symantec, Securify, The Association of Corporate Council, the University of California, and Brigham Young University.

He regularly gives presentations on security, Web development and open source worldwide, from Edinburgh to Beijing to San Francisco. He lives and plays near the Puget Sound in Washington State.

OSCON 2008